The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
i want to shadow an engineer
Old 15th September 2011
  #1
Gear Head
 

i want to shadow an engineer

I've been wanted to shadow an engineer for the longest time just so i can get some experience from watching him/her do the job and ask questions. i realize that i'd be doing grunt work, but thats fine. willing to take up duties such as cleaning, heavy lifting, breakdowns/setups, coffee runs, etc. i would be willing to shadow a controlled studio engineer or a live mixer but the thing is i can't find anybody who will let me, most say because im 20 and not 21 yet. i live in chicago so there are tons of venues but i just dont know how to get myself in the door since i have no experience on the engineer side of the board. anybody know anything about how to get myself a shadowing position?
Old 15th September 2011
  #2
Gear Head
 

You might try calling it an internship rather than a shadowing position and you might have better luck.

Also, do you have time/means to educate yourself on the basics of signal flow, patchbays, DAWs, gear, etc?? Can you take classes at a local recording school or workshop? Your local community college probably offers some bastardized version of an audio class. The point is, show some initiave! Why would an engineer want to have you in his session? What can you offer to the session besides the perfect latte?

If you can come in and HELP while you are learning then you are valuable to the process. If I can hand you a track sheet and unlock the mic locker and you can set up mics while I talk strategy with the band then you have gotten to the point where I want you there. On the other hand, if you know absolutely nothing about the fundamentals, I won't be able to teach you about the advanced process of mixing while a client is paying me $50 an hour! The terminology alone will be way over your head. Also, if you are making an effort to educate yourself, it shows me you are somewhat determined. Understand the engineers side. I've had dozens of interns that come in saying they are ready to learn and do what it takes and pay their dues then they disappear after 3 weeks of work because they "thought they would be mixing records by now." Everybody loves the idea of making music, but when they see where the sausage is made, they change their tune.

If u want it bad enough, you will find a way to learn. If you stay passionate about it, somebody will notice. I got my first internship at 15... Before I had a license! You can do it, just try to bring somethin to the table!

Good luck!
Old 15th September 2011
  #3
Gear Head
 

You might try calling it an internship rather than a shadowing position and you might have better luck.

Also, do you have time/means to educate yourself on the basics of signal flow, patchbays, DAWs, gear, etc?? Can you take classes at a local recording school or workshop? Your local community college probably offers some bastardized version of an audio class. The point is, show some initiave! Why would an engineer want to have you in his session? What can you offer to the session besides the perfect latte?

If you can come in and HELP while you are learning then you are valuable to the process. If I can hand you a track sheet and unlock the mic locker and you can set up mics while I talk strategy with the band then you have gotten to the point where I want you there. On the other hand, if you know absolutely nothing about the fundamentals, I won't be able to teach you about the advanced process of mixing while a client is paying me $50 an hour! The terminology alone will be way over your head. Also, if you are making an effort to educate yourself, it shows me you are somewhat determined. Understand the engineers side. I've had dozens of interns that come in saying they are ready to learn and do what it takes and pay their dues then they disappear after 3 weeks of work because they "thought they would be mixing records by now." Everybody loves the idea of making music, but when they see where the sausage is made, they change their tune.

If u want it bad enough, you will find a way to learn. If you stay passionate about it, somebody will notice. I got my first internship at 15... Before I had a license! You can do it, just try to bring somethin to the table!

Good luck!
Old 15th September 2011
  #4
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by notyetfamous View Post
You might try calling it an internship rather than a shadowing position and you might have better luck.

Also, do you have time/means to educate yourself on the basics of signal flow, patchbays, DAWs, gear, etc?? Can you take classes at a local recording school or workshop? Your local community college probably offers some bastardized version of an audio class. The point is, show some initiave! Why would an engineer want to have you in his session? What can you offer to the session besides the perfect latte?

If you can come in and HELP while you are learning then you are valuable to the process. If I can hand you a track sheet and unlock the mic locker and you can set up mics while I talk strategy with the band then you have gotten to the point where I want you there. On the other hand, if you know absolutely nothing about the fundamentals, I won't be able to teach you about the advanced process of mixing while a client is paying me $50 an hour! The terminology alone will be way over your head. Also, if you are making an effort to educate yourself, it shows me you are somewhat determined. Understand the engineers side. I've had dozens of interns that come in saying they are ready to learn and do what it takes and pay their dues then they disappear after 3 weeks of work because they "thought they would be mixing records by now." Everybody loves the idea of making music, but when they see where the sausage is made, they change their tune.

If u want it bad enough, you will find a way to learn. If you stay passionate about it, somebody will notice. I got my first internship at 15... Before I had a license! You can do it, just try to bring somethin to the table!

Good luck!
makes sense, currently reading a pro tools for dummies book cover to cover if that counts. is there any others?
Old 15th September 2011
  #5
Gear Head
 

There is a book, pro tools 101 that is the first part of pro tools certification. It's a good basic book that teaches you how the software works so you can understand what your seeing as an intern.

Amazon.com: Pro Tools 101 Official Courseware (9781598631548): Digidesign: Books

There are many many excellent books on how to use pro tools, this is a good start, if I were you I would do a lot of reading while making your calls to get an internship.
Old 15th September 2011
  #6
Gear Head
 

Modern Recording Techniques is a good read. A majority of the info is accurate, in the 5th edition at least. I havnt looked at the most recent version (7) but I didnt like the 6th edition as much.

I teach one on one instruction for cats who buy Protools and have no clue what to do with it. I usually insist they give this book a read so they have an idea on the basics of sound, signal flow, etc.

What about classes in your area? Did you look into those?

A community college class at least?
Old 16th September 2011
  #7
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by notyetfamous View Post
Modern Recording Techniques is a good read. A majority of the info is accurate, in the 5th edition at least. I havnt looked at the most recent version (7) but I didnt like the 6th edition as much.

I teach one on one instruction for cats who buy Protools and have no clue what to do with it. I usually insist they give this book a read so they have an idea on the basics of sound, signal flow, etc.

What about classes in your area? Did you look into those?

A community college class at least?
i realize there is good material for reading on all of the basics but i was looking to just help around a studio or venue... i have enough reading.
Top Mentioned Products
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump