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Who here offers mix review services? Dynamics Plugins
Old 2nd November 2016
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Who here offers mix review services?

Looking for Mastering Engineer that offers mix review services.
Old 4th November 2016
  #2
Gear Addict
 
djwaudio's Avatar
I usually offer some feedback when asked before mastering a project.

Also, I have a special service/rate for working with artists & producers who want more ongoing production feedback and project reviews.

I have professional training experience so the feedback is always helpful and encouraging. :-)

Also there's the three N's:

Need to know
Nice to know
Noise...
Old 4th November 2016
  #3
Gear Guru
 
lucey's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-money View Post
Looking for Mastering Engineer that offers mix review services.
Here's a free review for any mix:

1. Get to know your mixing room with refs in your genre that describe the edges. What is: dark, bright, mids forward, vocal up, vocal back, loud, more dynamic, sibilant, etc. etc. Once you know the edges, you can play in the middle. There's no freedom without a fence.

2. Mix for the dynamics of other mixes in your general genre. Yet not the peak level, any peak over -20 is fine. Make it move up and down appropriately, momentum is key.

3. Work on the mix balances until you can't go any further, and it's good in the studio and the car.

Send it


If you're happy with it, any warts from the process, mixing room, etc. will become part of the charm to the world post mastering with a pro who can deal with it musically.

So much of what is important in music is presenting a bold and clear artistic vision, not a "great mix". There is no perfect mix. Perfecting a mix is a sure way to neutering the unique power.
Old 4th November 2016
  #4
Gear Addict
 
Mastering7's Avatar
 

I have some guys who send me the tracks bounced in subgroups before mastering for advice.
Old 5th November 2016
  #5
Gear Nut
 

After you choose your mastering engineer, if they are professionals, they will give you advises how to improve your mix to achieve the best results in the mastering stage. I do this for all of my clients. How to choose your mastering engineer? I believe the only way is to send your mix to as many MEs as you can find and compare the results. After that you will work with the chosen one to get the best out of your mix. I often return mixes for at least level changes of some tracks, FX touches, stereo problems and others small issues. As a fine art, audio mastering depends on very small changes in the mix in purpose to achieve its goals. So, I think that any professional ME would help you with your mix, but first you have to choose who this person is. Otherwise, collecting many opinions and trying to experiment with all points of view, you could end mixing one song for the rest of your life... If you are stuck in the mixing process, you can also consider hiring a producer - their job is exactly that.
Old 5th November 2016
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-money View Post
Looking for Mastering Engineer that offers mix review services.
I offer mix review. But I suggest one basic thing for all novice mix engineers / producers (most of them are not doing that), test your mix yourself too - put EQ on master and boost bass and trebles and put limiter on master (for example FabFilter Pro L, and use same RMS volume as final mastered song). Then export and test on various speakers - hi-fi, home, small speakers, big speakers, headphones - always compare with reference songs. This will show you many problems of mix that are visible only at high volumes. Of course please note transients/peaks will be nicer, rounder, softer and overall sound more pleasant after analog mastering than with basic software limiting and eq.
Old 6th November 2016
  #7
Gear Guru
 
lucey's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MARIAN BREZOVAN View Post
I offer mix review. But I suggest one basic thing for all novice mix engineers / producers (most of them are not doing that), test your mix yourself too - put EQ on master and boost bass and trebles and put limiter on master (for example FabFilter Pro L, and use same RMS volume as final mastered song). Then export and test on various speakers - hi-fi, home, small speakers, big speakers, headphones - always compare with reference songs. This will show you many problems of mix that are visible only at high volumes. Of course please note transients/peaks will be nicer, rounder, softer and overall sound more pleasant after analog mastering than with basic software limiting and eq.
Why boost bass and treble, just make it louder with the monitor controller or a limiter, and compare to other work.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dimitvel View Post
After you choose your mastering engineer, if they are professionals, they will give you advises how to improve your mix to achieve the best results in the mastering stage. I do this for all of my clients. How to choose your mastering engineer? I believe the only way is to send your mix to as many MEs as you can find and compare the results. After that you will work with the chosen one to get the best out of your mix. I often return mixes for at least level changes of some tracks, FX touches, stereo problems and others small issues. As a fine art, audio mastering depends on very small changes in the mix in purpose to achieve its goals. So, I think that any professional ME would help you with your mix, but first you have to choose who this person is. Otherwise, collecting many opinions and trying to experiment with all points of view, you could end mixing one song for the rest of your life... If you are stuck in the mixing process, you can also consider hiring a producer - their job is exactly that.
The better MEs are not giving mix advice, that's the job of a producer or a friend on the production team. And they aren't doing free singles either. What you're describing is the way that new MEs make themselves more valuable and cripple the process of the aspiring mixer with a kind of co dependency.

The second half of this post makes sense. Don't try everything, go for the ONE thing. Mixing is creating a single mix with a single vision, it's not about perfection. Convey: Emotion, the Artist, Momentum, Musicality, Uniqueness. These things matter.


Mastering is then enhancing based on the direction the mix implies. The way that you get better at mixing is by critical listening and comparison, not asking a ME with limited experience how to make your mix ultimately more generic, based on safe averages. Generic "good advice" ideas might make a better mix on paper but not a more musical or compelling mix in real life.
Old 6th November 2016
  #8
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lucey View Post
The better MEs are not giving mix advice, that's the job of a producer or a friend on the production team.
I agree, but I said "they will give you advises how to improve your mix to achieve the best results in the mastering stage." which is completely different.

I agree about the free samples.

But I also agree with the fact that this place here is not for people who have enough work. Even I don't stay 24/7 chatting...

And finally, we all have heard really bad jobs done by the most expensive and popular MEs, but also very very good jobs done by the most unknown guys with laptops and headphones...

So, IMHO collecting free samples stays the fastest and the most honest way for a newbie to find their guy! They can always go for a big name no matter the result, though.... :-))
Old 7th November 2016
  #9
Gear Guru
 
lucey's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by dimitvel View Post
I agree, but I said "they will give you advises how to improve your mix to achieve the best results in the mastering stage." which is completely different.

I agree about the free samples.

But I also agree with the fact that this place here is not for people who have enough work. Even I don't stay 24/7 chatting...

And finally, we all have heard really bad jobs done by the most expensive and popular MEs, but also very very good jobs done by the most unknown guys with laptops and headphones...

So, IMHO collecting free samples stays the fastest and the most honest way for a newbie to find their guy! They can always go for a big name no matter the result, though.... :-))
Easy with the assumptions. I work 7 days a week and do thousands of song a year, that's "not enough work" to you? This place used to have more people posting who were that busy, it's gone to the newbies a bit.

A "bad job" by a good ME is what exactly in your view? Is it bad because you say so? The client clearly wanted it, so it's was a good job to them. Asking people who are not busy enough to give away work is "honest"? How is that more honest than other approaches? How is it fast? The fast way is to work with someone good, tell them what you want up front or let them surprise you, then revise. Fastest way to top quality.

You don't make objective sense, you are just arguing for yourself, let's be clear.

If you want to give away work to get work, go for it. If you want to make yourself more valuable to newer mixers by telling them how to mix, go for it. The latter is especially counter productive in my experience, to the whole process of great music, and to their growth.
Old 7th November 2016
  #10
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lucey View Post
Easy with the assumptions. I work 7 days a week and do thousands of song a year, that's "not enough work" to you? This place used to have more people posting who were that busy, it's gone to the newbies a bit.

A "bad job" by a good ME is what exactly in your view? Is it bad because you say so? The client clearly wanted it, so it's was a good job to them. Asking people who are not busy enough to give away work is "honest"? How is that more honest than other approaches? How is it fast? The fast way is to work with someone good, tell them what you want up front or let them surprise you, then revise. Fastest way to top quality.

You don't make objective sense, you are just arguing for yourself, let's be clear.

If you want to give away work to get work, go for it. If you want to make yourself more valuable to newer mixers by telling them how to mix, go for it. The latter is especially counter productive in my experience, to the whole process of great music, and to their growth.
I will not argue! :-) Pay attention on "IMHO" in my post... I work when I want to, so I have no pressure...

Regarding the bad jobs out there, anybody could see them but ONLY if they know how those albums and singles could sound...

Any business in any condition will have any customers any time...
Old 10th November 2016
  #11
Here for the gear
I always include a mix review as a part of the mastering process, it is very important that you have a reference so that I can help you get what you're after.

Cheers
Old 14th November 2016
  #12
I've a mixing review alone service without mastering or it's always included by any order of any mastering services (with or without tape, stems or even mixing) by default.

client/engineer communication is 50% of the job of the engineer IMO... to offer the best result possible! That's why it's more expensive that a algorithm aka automated mastering!!
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