The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Surround/ambisonic/Atmos distribution
Old 21st April 2019
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
DaveyJones's Avatar
 

Surround/ambisonic/Atmos distribution

Hi all, I like this new sub-forum. Never seen it before but I'm assuming it's fairly new...


Anyway, I usually record classical audio, live concerts and producing location session work too. My masters are all delivered in stereo format, somewhere between CD rate (44.1/24) and Ultra-Hi Res (192/24).

Recently I've been having discussions with a few label owners who are interested in experimenting with Dolby Atmos, multi-channel audio or even VR.

I'm curious as to whether there are any slutz here that are currently recording MUSIC that is being recorded/mixed/distributed in formats beyond two channel CD or streaming at the moment. I'd love to know if there are any online distribution methods for multichannel audio?
How are you using ambisonic captures in your mixing/masters?
Has anybody here worked on a music focused or music only Dolby Atmos release?


Thanks, Dave
Old 21st April 2019
  #2
Lives for gear
 
PatrickFaith's Avatar
 

I think one of the great places is the netflix standards. It's 5.1 focused: SPECIFICATIONS & GUIDES – Netflix | Partner Help Center
For more details look under the sub area: Netflix Sound Mix Specifications & Best Practices v1.1 – Netflix | Partner Help Center

This is also in line with the apple delivery requirements, also since apple distributes both film & music at volume I think itunes distribution is pretty compelling: Guides - Movies - iTunes Connect Resources and Help with some of the deliver specs for 5.1 at https://help.apple.com/itc/videoaudioassetguide/ .

For pure music itunes has starting to do binaural, but I'm a bigger fan of 5.1 with some type of video with the music. There's a bunch of more "experimental" things for VR, but it's really hard for me to see which channel is going to really make it. I have about one of everything VR/XR - trying to figure distribution out, but as a consumer I prefer apple and netflix, with my fancy 5.1 system connected via itunes.
Old 25th April 2019
  #3
Here for the gear
 

We do music-focused releases in AR via iPhone apps, and have posted how-to guides for folks to build their own. Single apps are a perfectly great release mechanism and give us more control over everything in the distribution. You can see our work at tcwav.com. I'm intrigued by Atmos, as well.
Old 28th May 2019
  #4
Here for the gear
 

Definitely interested in tools that can take B format and output to Atmos. I think Dolby has one?
Old 29th May 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
 
NReichman's Avatar
 

Quote:
I'm curious as to whether there are any slutz here that are currently recording MUSIC that is being recorded/mixed/distributed in formats beyond two channel CD or streaming at the moment. I'd love to know if there are any online distribution methods for multichannel audio?
How are you using ambisonic captures in your mixing/masters?
Has anybody here worked on a music focused or music only Dolby Atmos release?
I have a release of a new album with Seattle Symphony coming out next month that we mixed in Dolby Atmos. With Dolby's generous advice, I worked out a delivery mechanism that makes a downloadable MP4 with DD+JOC Atmos encoding. Fun stuff and it sounds good. I'm slammed right now but will come back this forum once the release is public if anyone is curious about the workflow.
Old 29th May 2019
  #6
Gear Maniac
 
DaveyJones's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NReichman View Post
I have a release of a new album with Seattle Symphony coming out next month that we mixed in Dolby Atmos. With Dolby's generous advice, I worked out a delivery mechanism that makes a downloadable MP4 with DD+JOC Atmos encoding. Fun stuff and it sounds good. I'm slammed right now but will come back this forum once the release is public if anyone is curious about the workflow.
Definitely yes please!!

Very interested in the way you went about both recording and editing this release. Did you go into the production knowing it was going to be a Dolby Atmos release?
How are you utilising the system beyond what a 2.0 system can do?


Thanks, Dave
Old 30th May 2019
  #7
Gear Maniac
 
elpillo's Avatar
 

I'm starting to do experiments with immersive recordings and mixing them (for now) with DearVR in PT. I'm just a couple of weeks away from getting the Dolby Atmos Production Suite tand start playing with it. I'm also interested in music distribution channels for future immersive/VR projects. Surround (5.1) is fun, but to me immersive audio is even more, particularly channel based recordings. Looking forward to read more from all of you!
Old 22nd June 2019
  #8
Lives for gear
 

I mix in 3rd order ambisonics for 360 Videos that are viewed mostly on the Oculus Go. It's fairly easy to make a mix, join it to a blank video, then put it into the Go for a head tracking / binaural rendering of 2nd order audio, but it doesn't make much sense to wear a headset if there aren't any visuals....maybe someone will come up with a simple head tracker to add to any existing pair of headphones, and I know several companies have been working on headphones w/ trackers built in. I'm just not sure how much of a market there is for this sort of thing. Atmos is interesting, and I've been to some demos of their mixing system, but again, I'm not sure how realistic it is to expect any sizeable chunk of the market to invest in home surround systems at this point. A handful of clubs have Atmos systems for music as well, but it's all so niche right now.
Old 6th September 2019
  #9
Here for the gear
 

We have created a streaming service for virtualized surround sound on headphones. The companies making VR tech were focused on DPS integration into mobile devices, and that wasn't going anywhere. With full VR (audio + visual), you need to buy expensive equipment.

Happy to talk more about this!

Note to mod: Not trying to explicitly advertise, but our information does answer the OP's question. Apologies if our post isn't appropriate.
Old 6th September 2019
  #10
Lives for gear
 
huub's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonhoneyball View Post
Definitely interested in tools that can take B format and output to Atmos. I think Dolby has one?
In case you did not find it yet: Rode has a free plug in that does that.

https://en.rode.com/soundfieldplugin
Old 9th September 2019
  #11
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by huub View Post
In case you did not find it yet: Rode has a free plug in that does that.

https://en.rode.com/soundfieldplugin
Indeed, I´ve been experimenting with it. Very nice plugin to convert from B format into multichannel.

However, it does not convert to Atmos, it only converts to 7.1.2. You´ll need either an AVID Atmos Production Suite for PT, or an external RMU runing the Atmos Mastering Suite to generate your Atmos master files.
Old 14th September 2019
  #12
Lives for gear
 
spiderman's Avatar
Fun thread... I just started experimenting with attempts to move multichannel music (quadraphonic) into Ambisonic format for delivery over YouTube (supports VR). I've seen several videos that playback 3D audio over YouTube. My initial experiment was to create a surround synth patch and record is as 1st Order Ambisonic (B Format).

I've worked in surround for years but this was my first attempt at using headphone 3D audio.... and it wasn't a good replication of the quadraphonic image. Maybe I didn't configure Nuendo correctly? Curious to know more about proper ways to record and mix music in Ambisonic, and eventually deliver via YouTube. Any tips?
Old 14th September 2019
  #13
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderman View Post
Fun thread... I just started experimenting with attempts to move multichannel music (quadraphonic) into Ambisonic format for delivery over YouTube (supports VR). I've seen several videos that playback 3D audio over YouTube. My initial experiment was to create a surround synth patch and record is as 1st Order Ambisonic (B Format).

I've worked in surround for years but this was my first attempt at using headphone 3D audio.... and it wasn't a good replication of the quadraphonic image. Maybe I didn't configure Nuendo correctly? Curious to know more about proper ways to record and mix music in Ambisonic, and eventually deliver via YouTube. Any tips?
Native Ambisonics recording needs an Ambisonics microphone. You can however do what you´ve done using software that converts from multichannel/stereo/mono and output in FOA or higher Ambisonics format. You can also mix native Ambisonics recordings with stereo/mono and multichannel.

Some elements don´t need to move in the 3D space, like music when it makes part of other elements as sound effects, ambient recordings etc. It´s called headlocked mix that can also be uploaded to Facebook. On Youtube I guess it´s a slightly more complicated process.

One software I´ve been using that I like a lot for music is DearVR Pro. It allows positioning and reverb within the same plugin with very good results IMHO. You can place it on several tracks the contribute to a mix and position, play with distance, elevation etc. It outputs in Binaural as well, wich is great, if all you want is a more immersive 3D sound without the need to auto panning on 360 videos or VR. They have a 30 day fully workable trial.Here´s the link:

https://www.dearvr.com/products/dearvr-pro
Old 14th September 2019
  #14
Lives for gear
 
spiderman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulo m View Post
Native Ambisonics recording needs an Ambisonics microphone. You can however do what you´ve done using software that converts from multichannel/stereo/mono and output in FOA or higher Ambisonics format. You can also mix native Ambisonics recordings with stereo/mono and multichannel.

Some elements don´t need to move in the 3D space, like music....
Guess I should give more detail about my quadraphonic source. You're right... maybe I shouldn't be recording to an ambisonic channel, but into multiple mono with ambisonic headlock panning?

My source is a quadrphonic mixer with CV controlled panning. So audio is 4 mono sources (assigned as L/R/Ls/Rs) with dynamic panning between channels.
Old 15th September 2019
  #15
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderman View Post
Guess I should give more detail about my quadraphonic source. You're right... maybe I shouldn't be recording to an ambisonic channel, but into multiple mono with ambisonic headlock panning?

My source is a quadrphonic mixer with CV controlled panning. So audio is 4 mono sources (assigned as L/R/Ls/Rs) with dynamic panning between channels.
Ty to start with your 4 mono sources positioned to taste using a 360 audio sphere panner inserted in each of your 4 mono source tracks, so that your CV controlled panning translates as you intend and monitor in binaural before the encoding into ambisonics for Youtube upload.

Considering your source material, I don´t think you need auto panning when the viewer moves it´s head or uses the rotate view button on the video, just a headlocked mix will be enough, but it all depends on your 360 video.

Give it a try to the DearVR plugin that I recommended earlier, I did something similar and it worked well.

Alternatively, you can also try the Facebook 360 plugins which are free:

https://facebook360.fb.com/spatial-workstation/

If binaural is just what you need, try this free panner as well:

https://en-us.sennheiser.com/ambeo-orbit

You need to take in consideration that if your mix will be listened on speakers, part of the 360 immersion will be lost, it will be similar to plain multichannel.

If using headphones, the 360 field is kept so it will be a binaural output, even if coming from an ambisonics master.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #16
Lives for gear
 

From my experience, it's just not going to sound anywhere near as immersive when listened to on headphones as compared to a speaker array, regardless of what approach you take or software you use. I've never taken quadraphonic material into ambisonics, but I have a fair amount of experience building ambisonic mixes for headphones using ambisonic sources, spot mics, and sound design. I've tried every ambisonic to binaural decoder out there, and while the paid Blue Ripple headphone decoder sounds really good, it still doesn't convince me at all when it comes to height and front / rear differentiation. One of the best surround pieces I've heard was at Stanford a few years back, when CCRMA set up their biggest hemispherical speaker array in a huge room. I spoke afterwards with one of the professors whose piece really blew me away, and found out that he somehow took an old stereo mix and converted it into 7th order ambisonics. The immersion and feeling of pressure changing all around me were truly incredible, and I have no idea how he made that stereo mix come to life the way he did. Most of what I heard would probably bore me on headphones though...I'm a bit jaded at this point, but the best result you'll get will likely come from mixing in as high an order as possible, 3rd-7th maybe, listening on top shelf headphones with a personalized Sonarworks calibration for your exact headphones, decoded into binaural with a custom SOFA file that matches your HRTF.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #17
Lives for gear
 
spiderman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by over-man View Post
From my experience, it's just not going to sound anywhere near as immersive when listened to on headphones as compared to a speaker array, regardless of what approach you take or software you use. I've never taken quadraphonic material into ambisonics, but I have a fair amount of experience building ambisonic mixes for headphones using ambisonic sources, spot mics, and sound design. I've tried every ambisonic to binaural decoder out there, and while the paid Blue Ripple headphone decoder sounds really good, it still doesn't convince me at all when it comes to height and front / rear differentiation. One of the best surround pieces I've heard was at Stanford a few years back, when CCRMA set up their biggest hemispherical speaker array in a huge room. I spoke afterwards with one of the professors whose piece really blew me away, and found out that he somehow took an old stereo mix and converted it into 7th order ambisonics. The immersion and feeling of pressure changing all around me were truly incredible, and I have no idea how he made that stereo mix come to life the way he did. Most of what I heard would probably bore me on headphones though...I'm a bit jaded at this point, but the best result you'll get will likely come from mixing in as high an order as possible, 3rd-7th maybe, listening on top shelf headphones with a personalized Sonarworks calibration for your exact headphones, decoded into binaural with a custom SOFA file that matches your HRTF.
My limited experience, while doing these tests, make me feel this is a truly accurate estimation. Even when I got the positioning and motion... it never felt like a quality experience. Something about the phase manipulation and coloration of the sound... wasn't that great.

On another note... part of what inspired this is the positioning experience I've noticed while playing games on headphones. With either Dolby Atmos or Windows Sonic, the positioning and clarity of the headphone spatial positioning seemed better... but I'm wondering if that's the relationship of the decoder?

Anyone know technical information about audio prepared and delivered for Dolby Atmos and/or Windows Sonic, and how that uses or is different from standard Ambisonics?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #18
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by over-man View Post
From my experience, it's just not going to sound anywhere near as immersive when listened to on headphones as compared to a speaker array, regardless of what approach you take or software you use.
I agree with that, the point is, who is prepared to listen to that in a normal home
environment? Listening to ambisonics in spherical all around speakers is great but you can only find it at labs or special installations. Even sound studios don´t have it, with a few notable exceptions.

Even with plain 5.1, most people at home don´t have it and many who do, have the speakers in less than ideal positions. Then, when you take into account the listening habits of millennials and gen Z, which basically listen on mobile devices and also the proliferation of smart speakers, where does it all end up? Probably the best bet will be headphones. Ideal? Certainly not.
Take Dolby Atmos for example, apart from cinema releases where you watch in a "controlled" listening environment, the applications for it are many, be it streaming, games or even music, yet the end mass listening experience is going to be either on Atmos soundbars (with associated high prices), upfiring speakers or and here it comes again, headphones by the use of binauralization. Only a minority will have the resources or even bother to setup a decent Atmos speaker setup. The same is true for DTX X or Auro 3D.

So, it´s not good, but headphones may be your best friend for the time being!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #19
Lives for gear
 
NReichman's Avatar
 

Sorry for the delay guys! Here's a quick rundown of making an Atmos MP4. I love this format because the resulting MP4 file plays on any device, to as many speakers as you have. So for example it sounds good in stereo on an old iPhone with headphones, it plays on a 5.1 setup, and it plays on home Atmos systems (most likely putting it on a USB stick and sticking it into your receiver or TV).

The album I produced is available in this format here: Become Desert – John Luther Adams

Here are the steps, and you can message me or post here if you need more details:

1. make a .atmos file (it's actually a folder, but you know what I mean). Must be at 48k, if not, use Atmos Conversion Tool to get there.

2. convert .atmos file with Dolby Media Producer to an EC3 file.

3. make a video file 'elementary stream' of the same length. I did this by making an H.264 .mkv in Premiere and converting it with FFMPEG using "-vbsf h264_mp4toannexb" (info about this online)

4. mux the EC3 file and the H.264 stream using "Dolby mp4muxer_mac" via command line in Terminal. (application freely available on Github)

and... BAM! You've got the best MP4 file ever. It has to have a video component, even if that's a black screen or still image (in my case an album cover).

This is easier than it looks, especially after you've done it a few times.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #20
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NReichman View Post
Sorry for the delay guys! Here's a quick rundown of making an Atmos MP4. I love this format because the resulting MP4 file plays on any device, to as many speakers as you have. So for example it sounds good in stereo on an old iPhone with headphones, it plays on a 5.1 setup, and it plays on home Atmos systems (most likely putting it on a USB stick and sticking it into your receiver or TV).

The album I produced is available in this format here: Become Desert – John Luther Adams

Here are the steps, and you can message me or post here if you need more details:

1. make a .atmos file (it's actually a folder, but you know what I mean). Must be at 48k, if not, use Atmos Conversion Tool to get there.

2. convert .atmos file with Dolby Media Producer to an EC3 file.

3. make a video file 'elementary stream' of the same length. I did this by making an H.264 .mkv in Premiere and converting it with FFMPEG using "-vbsf h264_mp4toannexb" (info about this online)

4. mux the EC3 file and the H.264 stream using "Dolby mp4muxer_mac" via command line in Terminal. (application freely available on Github)

and... BAM! You've got the best MP4 file ever. It has to have a video component, even if that's a black screen or still image (in my case an album cover).

This is easier than it looks, especially after you've done it a few times.
Hi Reichman, thanks for sharing. I thought it would be Dolby AC4 encoding. Why EC3? Is it Dolby Digital Plus encoding, the same as for example Netflix uses for streaming Atmos? Are objects in the Dolby Atmos master file still preserved in EC3? For people listening on mobile platforms, how is the conversion to binaural done? When listening on headphones, do you think it translate better or worse than by using the Atmos binaural rendering on Atomos mastering or production suites?
Thanks for sharing your experience on this matters when you have the time.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #21
Quote:
Originally Posted by NReichman View Post
Sorry for the delay guys! Here's a quick rundown of making an Atmos MP4. I love this format because the resulting MP4 file plays on any device, to as many speakers as you have. So for example it sounds good in stereo on an old iPhone with headphones, it plays on a 5.1 setup, and it plays on home Atmos systems (most likely putting it on a USB stick and sticking it into your receiver or TV).

The album I produced is available in this format here: Become Desert – John Luther Adams
the link you posted is for a FLAC file (lossless encoded sound normally) of am I misunderstanding this? Do you have an example of the mp4 stream somewhere (an excerpt maybe?)
I like this idea of putting Dolby Atmos in a mp4.
Would the stream be recognised by a hometheater amp, via HDMI in coming from a MacBookPro for example (playing it in VLC with the right audio settings)?
Thanks for your time!

Greetings,

Thierry
Old 3 weeks ago
  #22
Lives for gear
 
NReichman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Hi Reichman, thanks for sharing. I thought it would be Dolby AC4 encoding. Why EC3? Is it Dolby Digital Plus encoding, the same as for example Netflix uses for streaming Atmos? Are objects in the Dolby Atmos master file still preserved in EC3? For people listening on mobile platforms, how is the conversion to binaural done? When listening on headphones, do you think it translate better or worse than by using the Atmos binaural rendering on Atomos mastering or production suites?
Thanks for sharing your experience on this matters when you have the time.
I don't claim to be the expert in all this, but making the EC3 file is a necessary step. It is DD+JOC, and objects are definitely preserved. There is some object-grouping going on (the DAPS (Dolby Atmos Production Suite) manual goes into this), but it sounds fine. My file is very similar to what I believe Netflix is doing.

Binaural output on mobile platforms is rendered on the fly. I haven't done extensive comparison between the direct binaural output from DAPS and for example my Xbox, but when I tested it, it sounded good. I do need to do more listening tests of binaural.


Quote:
the link you posted is for a FLAC file (lossless encoded sound normally) of am I misunderstanding this? Do you have an example of the mp4 stream somewhere (an excerpt maybe?)
I like this idea of putting Dolby Atmos in a mp4.
Would the stream be recognised by a hometheater amp, via HDMI in coming from a MacBookPro for example (playing it in VLC with the right audio settings)?
Thanks for your time!

Greetings,
Actually that link is to an Atmos encoded MP4. The record store didn't know what department to put it in, so they added it to the FLAC multichannel section, even though it's not FLAC and not a fixed number of channels.

Yes, you can take this file and play it on your phone in stereo (or binaural on the newer phones). You can put it on a USB stick and plug it in to your home theater receiver and it will play as Atmos. You can play it on your Xbox, and you can play it in 5.1 on any computer connected to a 5.1 system. I don't know about VLC, but Dolby's entire intention with this format is to avoid that kind of geeky route. The idea is that it will be easy for the consumer.

I'll make another one with some intellectual property that I own and share a download link here. Maybe this weekend I'll have time to do that. More soon on all the topics above.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #23
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Thanks Reichman. Let us hear more when you have the time.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #24
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NReichman View Post
I don't claim to be the expert in all this, but making the EC3 file is a necessary step. It is DD+JOC, and objects are definitely preserved. There is some object-grouping going on (the DAPS (Dolby Atmos Production Suite) manual goes into this), but it sounds fine. My file is very similar to what I believe Netflix is doing.

Binaural output on mobile platforms is rendered on the fly. I haven't done extensive comparison between the direct binaural output from DAPS and for example my Xbox, but when I tested it, it sounded good. I do need to do more listening tests of binaural.




Actually that link is to an Atmos encoded MP4. The record store didn't know what department to put it in, so they added it to the FLAC multichannel section, even though it's not FLAC and not a fixed number of channels.

Yes, you can take this file and play it on your phone in stereo (or binaural on the newer phones). You can put it on a USB stick and plug it in to your home theater receiver and it will play as Atmos. You can play it on your Xbox, and you can play it in 5.1 on any computer connected to a 5.1 system. I don't know about VLC, but Dolby's entire intention with this format is to avoid that kind of geeky route. The idea is that it will be easy for the consumer.

I'll make another one with some intellectual property that I own and share a download link here. Maybe this weekend I'll have time to do that. More soon on all the topics above.
This is brilliant
Old 2 weeks ago
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Hi Reichman,

I just found a cloud tool from Dolby to encode to MP4, but it lacks Dolby Atmos:

https://developer.dolby.com/tools-me...reative-tools/

So you´re using the Media Suite, a bit expensive for my taste. I´m interested in Dolby Atmos Music, but would like to find a way to encode Atmos in a less expensive way. Any ideas?

Also, is it possible to test (monitor) the sort of files you´re generating at a studio level, prior to distribution, in a consumer device like a Sennheiser Atmos Soundbar or the new Amazon Echo Studio for example?

Thanks
Old 2 weeks ago
  #26
Lives for gear
 
NReichman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulo m View Post
So you´re using the Media Suite, a bit expensive for my taste. I´m interested in Dolby Atmos Music, but would like to find a way to encode Atmos in a less expensive way. Any ideas?

Also, is it possible to test (monitor) the sort of files you´re generating at a studio level, prior to distribution, in a consumer device like a Sennheiser Atmos Soundbar or the new Amazon Echo Studio for example?

Thanks
Regarding cost... watch this space. Patience will be rewarded...

I’ve tested my files on consumer Klipsch soundbars and on XBoxes. Xbox with the headphones plugged into a controller is nice.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #27
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NReichman View Post
Regarding cost... watch this space. Patience will be rewarded...

I’ve tested my files on consumer Klipsch soundbars and on XBoxes. Xbox with the headphones plugged into a controller is nice.
OK, watching

How do you connect in terms of interface/cabling to the soundbars and what player are you using that can decode the MP? Or is it the soundbar builtin decoder?

I´ve just read an article about Atmos reproduction at a home level, that objects are only preserved through HDMI, optical SPDIF would break the objects metadata. Any experiences on this? Thanks
Old 2 weeks ago
  #28
Lives for gear
 
NReichman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulo m View Post
OK, watching

How do you connect in terms of interface/cabling to the soundbars and what player are you using that can decode the MP? Or is it the soundbar builtin decoder?

I´ve just read an article about Atmos reproduction at a home level, that objects are only preserved through HDMI, optical SPDIF would break the objects metadata. Any experiences on this? Thanks
My limited experience so far in this domain is playing an MP4 file back on the device itself. The soundbar or whatever is doing the decoding. So for example, putting an MP4 on a USB flash drive and sticking that in the USB port of a home theater receiver. Or loading the MP4 onto an Xbox. S/PDIF is way too old a format to handle this. And I believe (but don't quote me on this), that HDMI required an update before it could handle immersive audio. So we're really talking about a Dolby Digital compatible audio file, not a digital audio transport mechanism.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #29
Gear Maniac
 
paulo m's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NReichman View Post
My limited experience so far in this domain is playing an MP4 file back on the device itself. The soundbar or whatever is doing the decoding. So for example, putting an MP4 on a USB flash drive and sticking that in the USB port of a home theater receiver. Or loading the MP4 onto an Xbox. S/PDIF is way too old a format to handle this. And I believe (but don't quote me on this), that HDMI required an update before it could handle immersive audio. So we're really talking about a Dolby Digital compatible audio file, not a digital audio transport mechanism.
OK, I was thinking about having a consumer monitoring like an Atmos enabled soundbar or smart speaker to check mixes after conversion to MP4 of the exported Atmos file from the AVID Production Suite.
Ideally from the same computer.

We use a Focusrite RED4 that gets Core audio from the MAC via thunderbolt, then converts to Dante and goes into the MTRX and then out to our monitor setup.

But that is not suitable to this, I need probably to use HDMI on the MAC (via a thunderbolt dock) to connect to the soundbar or whatever but be sure that the object metadata will be preserved until it gets to the soundbar builtin decoder.
Need to do some more research I guess

Here´s the article about HDMI on Dolby Atmos if you interested:

https://www.digitaltrends.com/home-t...y-atmos-sound/
Old 2 weeks ago
  #30
Lives for gear
 
NReichman's Avatar
 

Dolby Atmos Production Suite v3.3 released today. From the release notes:

Quote:
Dolby Atmos Renderer v3.3 includes new features, improvements, and fixes for using Dolby Atmos Renderer software to author content in Dolby Atmos.
• Ability to export to MP4 file format.
This allows you to export Dolby Atmos content for playback on Dolby Atmos-enabled consumer devices (such as a Blu-ray player or Dolby Atmos-enabled sound bar). For example, you can save the .mp4 file to a Universal Serial Bus (USB) stick, connect the stick to a USB input port on the device, and then play back the file on the device.
An exported Dolby Atmos .mp4 is for QC of Dolby Atmos content only. It is not for QC of 5.1 or stereo downmixes.
The .mp4 file will be a multiplexed Dolby Digital Plus with Dolby Atmos content and black 720 x 1280 .h264 video elementary stream at the frame rate of the master file.
I haven't tried it yet, but it looks like a significantly easier and cheaper method than I listed above. If any one reading here tests this, post back so we can know your thoughts. Download links look like they're not quite ready...
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump