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Full Sail Graduates Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 14th June 2006
  #121
Gear Addict
 

I think the point should be made is that Full Sail prepares students to be
DAW operators.

It is claimed that research has been made to adjust the curriculum to
meet that demand.

My feeling is that most anyone is not going to walk into any business
and get anything but the entry-level position without all ready
having a title that puts them above said entry-level position.

This transcends to any and every business in the world.

I would think that a recording school would emphasize on creating
people that, while interning, might impress someone enough to be allowed
to move ahead (if the bizarre chance of an appropriate position being available), as opposed to walk out the door and carry on with their lives (as most interns do).

An appropriate position would probably entail doing what is asked of one's
self. Including setting up microphones.

Understood, you learn many things with time, or "on the job". Or while observing.

The point is, what is the advantage of spending $40,000 if the information
you receive is mostly focused on 1 facet? Surely, emphasis is on "there are many fields out there, post, foley, etc.". But actual training has, for the most part,
only emphasized DAW editing and setting up a personal midi rig.

That's great if you have the oppurtunity of impressing someone with your knowledge of quick-keys and OMS; but what about everything else?

Furthermore, these kids already have DAW's and midi rigs at home.
They are part of the "you can do it for under $2,000" generation.

Emphasizing what you can find in 1,000's bedrooms across the nation, only
serves to justify someone into thinking "I know how to use this DAW, I know what a plugin is, I know how to use a midi keyboard....I must know everything.".
Old 14th June 2006
  #122
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brian_delizza's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobR
I think the point should be made is that Full Sail prepares students to be
DAW operators.
That is not true at all. I mean, you definitely learn how to work DAWs and become very good at it, but that is not at all the only thing you learn.

I remember tracking bands to tape, don't you?

I think a lot of kids just disregard everything they learn about analog recording because they are so concerned with doing everything ITB.
Old 14th June 2006
  #123
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Kestral's Avatar
 

I think RobR basically nailed it. $40K in order to qualify for an entry level position?

Here in Toronto years ago, a friend of mine was teaching at Trebas (it's the Canadian version of Full Sail but more ghetto). At the time I was a young pup a year or two from going to university (ended up going to business school but that's another story). So I asked him, should I go to Trebas, and keep in mind he was teaching digitial audio there.

He told me that if I took some of that money, spent it on a Pro Tools system and locked myself away for 6 months, I would be in a much better position both financially and competitively, than someone who paid full pop and spent 2+ years there.

And looking back, he was 100% correct.
Old 14th June 2006
  #124
Gear Addict
 

Kestral, that was not the point I was trying to make at all.
People pay 100's of thousands of dollars at plenty of colleges, just
to start in the mail room. Every one has to start from the bottom.
An education doesn't replace experience. My point is; the education
is supposed to give you an upperhand.

You might be standing next to the water tank talking about
stock investment tips; the head broker may overhear you say, "good golly,
let's move this guy/gal up. They really have the knowledge."

But you need a well rounded knowledge.

Brian, thus far, I don't recall tracking anything, whatsoever to a tape machine.

There is a session recording course (next month) towards the end of the curriculum.
Maybe we do such a thing at that point.

There are two tape calibration labs. Thus far, they are the only times anyone goes near a tape machine. I spoke with my instructor, and was allowed to sit in on those labs
an extra four or five times.
Old 15th June 2006
  #125
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brian_delizza's Avatar
 

Yes it is in session. In all honesty, I was sort of bitching until I got there. I learned more in session than in any other class. It is the class where you cover mic placement and all of that good stuff. You run a session by yourself from start to finish (well, in a small group). The fact that you sat extra in those sessions means something, I highly suggest you do the same in session recording, you will get your moneys worth...
Old 15th June 2006
  #126
Gear Addict
 

I don't know, they run things pretty tight. Whenever I sit in on extra time (at a lab),
it feels like we're (lab instructor/assistant course director and I) all breaking some rule and that I have to stay "hush hush". Sitting in on lectures is pretty easy, though; just walk in, sit between a few students, and tell them not to draw any attention to myself. heh
Old 15th June 2006
  #127
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Curious G's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobR
...People pay 100's of thousands of dollars at plenty of colleges, just
to start in the mail room.
Yes, and in the mail room you're likely to make some pretty good money compared to the "lucrative field of recording"...
heh heh heh heh heh
Old 15th June 2006
  #128
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djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobR
I don't know, they run things pretty tight. Whenever I sit in on extra time (at a lab),
it feels like we're (lab instructor/assistant course director and I) all breaking some rule and that I have to stay "hush hush".

So, what's the problem? I don't think you'd be happy if you had a billion dollars and some super model for a wife...
Old 15th June 2006
  #129
Gear Addict
 

When you make a point, you make a point.
Old 15th June 2006
  #130
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Jose Mrochek's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by djui5
So, what's the problem? I don't think you'd be happy if you had a billion dollars and some super model for a wife...
: )
Old 15th June 2006
  #131
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I know of a person who went to fullsail and graduated and for the most part knew nothing. Fumbled through a C Maj scale and didnt really understand the basics behind pro audio. From what I saw in this guy, I could have taught him more in an afternoon than what he seemed to learn in the program.

School is what you make of it, if you go there and bust yer nads, youre going to get a lot out of it. So dont worry about a 'reputation' let your work speak for you.
Old 15th June 2006
  #132
Lives for gear
Gotta say, I've never met anyone with a degree in audio engineering or the like (from Full Sail or otherwise) that had any added value over someone who didn't, all things being equal. The best engineers I know started as interns, or messed around by themselves until they were too frustrated with the state of their learning curve and then sought out internships under people they admire, and quite honestly I think this is the best way to learn - and it certainly doesn't cost $60K.

I also know great engineers, *excellent* engineers that went to Full Sail. I would argue, however, that these people would have been great engineers regardless.

I would think that a degree in electrical engineering would be more useful for an engineer, potentially cost less (depending on where you do it), and provide much more of a backup to earn if things aren't going well at a certain point. That is, *if* you're the type of person that wants to get a degree to do what you do (you certainly don't need one to be a great engineer!).

The problem I've always seen with these programs is that you get a tremendous lot of people who don't have any idea what they want to do with their life that 'decide' that they want to be an audio engineer because it sounds cool. They eventually go back to being complete bums (usually after being horrible interns and realizing that they can't handle paying the dues that being an engineer demands), but in the meantime they waste a good lot of their parents' money and YOUR time as a fellow student if you're the sort that wants to actually get something out of the experience.

Interning is the best school. And it's free. Just my $0.02.
Old 15th June 2006
  #133
Gear Addict
 
emreyazgin's Avatar
OK then, someone please suggest me an internship. Whoever industry professional i speak to they all talk the same "You are wasting your money @ SAE, you should do internship".... But whenever i say them "OK, give me a chance then.." they start going like "Emm..we currently don't employ interns...etc etc"....So should i give up? or just try and try for years until someone will let me be intern?
Old 15th June 2006
  #134
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brian_delizza's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thejook
The problem I've always seen with these programs is that you get a tremendous lot of people who don't have any idea what they want to do with their life that 'decide' that they want to be an audio engineer because it sounds cool. They eventually go back to being complete bums (usually after being horrible interns and realizing that they can't handle paying the dues that being an engineer demands), but in the meantime they waste a good lot of their parents' money and YOUR time as a fellow student if you're the sort that wants to actually get something out of the experience.

Wow, couldn't have said it better myself. There were kids in my class that would blatantly admit that...
Old 15th June 2006
  #135
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by emreyazgin
OK then, someone please suggest me an internship. Whoever industry professional i speak to they all talk the same "You are wasting your money @ SAE, you should do internship".... But whenever i say them "OK, give me a chance then.." they start going like "Emm..we currently don't employ interns...etc etc"....So should i give up? or just try and try for years until someone will let me be intern?
Have you tried posting a thread here (i.e. not in the Moan Zone)? There are a lot of London-area GSlutz, and I would bet that you might get some bites.
Old 15th June 2006
  #136
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robmix's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobR
I think the point should be made is that Full Sail prepares students to be DAW operators.
It is claimed that research has been made to adjust the curriculum to
meet that demand.
My feeling is that most anyone is not going to walk into any business
and get anything but the entry-level position without all ready
having a title that puts them above said entry-level position.
This transcends to any and every business in the world.
I would think that a recording school would emphasize on creating
people that, while interning, might impress someone enough to be allowed
to move ahead (if the bizarre chance of an appropriate position being available), as opposed to walk out the door and carry on with their lives (as most interns do).
An appropriate position would probably entail doing what is asked of one's
self. Including setting up microphones.
Understood, you learn many things with time, or "on the job". Or while observing.
The point is, what is the advantage of spending $40,000 if the information
you receive is mostly focused on 1 facet? Surely, emphasis is on "there are many fields out there, post, foley, etc.". But actual training has, for the most part,
only emphasized DAW editing and setting up a personal midi rig.
That's great if you have the oppurtunity of impressing someone with your knowledge of quick-keys and OMS; but what about everything else?
Furthermore, these kids already have DAW's and midi rigs at home.
They are part of the "you can do it for under $2,000" generation.
Emphasizing what you can find in 1,000's bedrooms across the nation, only
serves to justify someone into thinking "I know how to use this DAW, I know what a plugin is, I know how to use a midi keyboard....I must know everything.".
Actually, Full Sail might be on to something. The vast majority of young engineers are basically DAW operators. I'm consistently blown away when they can fly on Pro Tools but get completely lost when it comes to basic signal flow outside the box. it may not be the correct thing to be learning at an engineering school but it will propel you forward in the studio world as that will be your responsibility. As far as interning and assisting, again being able to fly on PT will get you noticed. I always give my assistants some time in the chair and that will involve PT. If you haven't had the training it will be crash and burn time.

Beyond plugging microphones in and tearing them down, I've never asked my assistants to place any mics, nor was I expected to do so when I assisted.

I'd be curious to see the FS curriculum today. It's certainly different than when I went there in '93. We touched mics the first week IIRC. Where are you in the year ? The website curriculum certainly lists things like post, multimedia, large format consoles, etc.
Old 15th June 2006
  #137
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xmostynx's Avatar
 

you know what-i was talking with an engineer here in pittsburgh
and i was asking about why all these guys wanted to make young kids 'intern' and really they are looking for all the 'free' help they can get..why? because they have studios that bring in no real talent-

anyone can record a cd today-its not that hard

and i'm not saying its bad to work with all the different people you can! its great to do that-see what everyone else is doing-and form your own way..

however i think the reason why music sucks so bad in the mainstream is:

there is a 'system' today of how you become somebody!-the era's before this one..produced GREAT music-they tried-they failed-they tried some more-experimentation-there was no ****ing system-the only system they went by was you make a sound-put it to tape-and add more to it-basic song structure 'system' to clear it up

you will never read a book and do something great-its impossible.. its not practical and its so 'american idol(ish) it makes me ****ing sick- and i'm sure many old timers are sick as well-people straight busted their asses to make records-sold their souls-sucked whatever they sucked-and they made records-they poured their heart and souls out-they knew what emotion is...today we have prozac and welbutrin we don't have RAW emotion...and the music suffers..

now was far as the industry goes..i think this list says pretty much why mtv is a ****ing sore to watch..

a) you have the same broke ass's producing these bands-over and over again-same lame producer who is making all of you intern

b) this generation is ****ing LAME-a bunch of cry baby emotional dudes-who haven't the slightest clue of balls and being a god damn man-but our question today is-what is a man...sheesh!

c) learn how to play more than a few 5ths or straight triads in D-or sloppy ass tapping that makes no ****ing sense in a song

d) why can't 'drummers' tune their ****ing drums? do they teach you guys in full sail-sae-how to tune drums? because thats the first step to putting up a drum kit BEFORE you ****ing throw any mics in front of it-and if the drummer has a problem with you ****ing with his kit-and he doesn't have years of touring under his belt or really can only hold a tight 2-4 backbeat...he's prolly a pussy and his ego is MTV inflamed-

unless they are super famous-anyone in the studio who is closed minded-is stuck where they are for a reason! what they are doing isn't working!!!!!!!!!!

and i can go on- as well as anyone can who has worked in this crooked ass industry-
you might be wondering what this has to do with full sail- or sae-or any audio school..
the bottom line is-great you went to school-

school is nothing more of a way to put stupid highschool kids right into the system
you have loans now-lots of debt-and you HAVE to work in this system now to pay it back or the government is gonna make your life hell...(trust me...i am ****ing plugged riiiight in)

i have been pushing my way through this industry meeting as many engineers as possible and kissing the right amount of ass-busting my own ass for days on end..and really the only thing that makes you or helps you learn is doing it your self.

sit in on sessions-as many as you can-****ing 10 a day if possible-watch and listen to what the engineer is doing-but don't think because your watching that your a chump-SOAK in what is going on-realize...wow this is the industry?! watch how the producer talks with the group-watch how he's asking for things-his tone of voice his choice of words..ask the engineer as many questions as you can think of-only dumb people dont' ask questions! he already knows he's gonna be drilled with them-your sitting in on HIS work...and if he gets annoyed **** em' keep asking and then at the end of the session be like-'man sorry for asking so many questions but what you where doing was so freakin' interesting and it was blowing my mind! ' (your blowing a little smoke up his ass and gaining some respect points!)

then..go out to a bar-have a few beers and find a band that you can record and produce-or better yet...PRACTICE with-apply everything that you got from sitting in on other studio sessions-and then put them into play-

all a recording school or any technical school can do is show you the basics-great music and great recordings come from sitting in the control room day in and day out as much as possible and switching compression settings/compressors on the snare does 3:1 sound better than 8:1 ?? does that hall verb sound better with a long decay or short? should i use a warm plate?...how about making an echo chamber in the bathroom!..how about another joint and then we'll try and set up an echo chamber... what about equalization!!!

****ing A people...**** these systematic schools and ****ing make awesome music!!!

one last suggestion-go get musictech magazine-its a uk publication-take a relaxing dump and read up on all the things your 40k diploma didn't tell you..mine was 62k!! ekkkkkk!!!!
Old 15th June 2006
  #138
Gear Addict
 
emreyazgin's Avatar
worths a shot but im almost sure people are reluctant to hire thourgh websites (and people they don't know..)
Old 15th June 2006
  #139
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robmix's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thejook
The problem I've always seen with these programs is that you get a tremendous lot of people who don't have any idea what they want to do with their life that 'decide' that they want to be an audio engineer because it sounds cool. They eventually go back to being complete bums (usually after being horrible interns and realizing that they can't handle paying the dues that being an engineer demands), but in the meantime they waste a good lot of their parents' money and YOUR time as a fellow student if you're the sort that wants to actually get something out of the experience.

Interning is the best school. And it's free. Just my $0.02.

I see this problem throughout the entertainment industry and it has nothing to do with school. Film and music are glamorous industries, they're going to attract a lot of people who through various contacts and twists of fate get into job tracts but have no idea what they're doing or any real talent .

As for interning, the problem is you simply can't guarantee the time frame and quality of your learning as an intern. I blew right by many interns when I first started because of my education, and for that I'm thankful.
Old 9th July 2006
  #140
Here for the gear
 

my take, and stance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson
I think the true crime is that they prey on people with romantic delusions about "the industry" and cater to pathetic types who think they can buy their way into "cool."

Other than that, I'm sure they're a fine bunch of folks.
First off I'm not even a FS student yet I plan to start in january for Show Production and Touring.


You have to understand something. There are people like myself. The people who've been saving up for two years to be able to afford to learn a skill, something they are passionate about. Something that will allow them to be around that passion for a nice portion of their life and be able to treat it as something more than just a hobby. I've been reading articles on FS grads and their work. Quite honestly, almost everything i've read has been exactly like this forum. 100% back and forth. So you see not EVERY person is an 18 year old KID who thinks they are going to become great friends with the popular band at the moment. I've lived three years on my own with no help from anyone, you learn that NOTHING comes easy and you learn to deal with it and keep pushing forward noone or nothing else will do it for you. I've learned that when you bust your ass and only in the right places you make things work out for you. You also learn other things like just when you get ahead you get set back, but you push on. I'm not going to fullsail just to have it on a resume i'm going because of the kind of learner I am. It seems to suit me. fast paced.

And the problem some of you had with finding jobs.....If you guys have ever heard of any technical field that will start you out as anything other than an internship with no real world experience? I'd love to know...
Old 10th July 2006
  #141
I admire your spirit, but I still think you're wasting your money.
Old 10th July 2006
  #142
Gear Addict
 

Actually, taking up the "show production" course is an excellent move.
Schools like this talk about a "fast track to success". 99%, it's a fast track
to getting a certificate, the rest being up to your own devices. "Show Production", on the other hand, holds a lot of weight.

First off, getting a job at a venue or with a tour production company, etc., etc.;
is not a troublesome task, whatsoever.

Secondly, you get paid $20,000-$40,000 a year, starting off.

Thirdly, if you tour, you never worry about paying rent/mortgage + utilities and all sorts of other pain in the ass monthly bills (which is where the majority of your earnings would have gone) .

Fourth, on top of your salary (and tips), you get a daily allowance that covers food + cigs + booze.

Fifth (again, on tour), you never have to worry about falling in love and dealing with all the economics attached.

If you plan on taking this course, you'll have maybe 20-40 students in your department, tops. You'll have plenty of work offered around the area (some free through school, some for pay).

The department is completely underpopulated (student wise), yet includes all the bells and whistles the school has to offer. Thus, it's open season on learning anything you can, hands-on.

Now, here's the deal:

Anytime I've ever lent a hand at a venue/festival/concert, whatever,
someone on the "crew" (I really don't remember what names they hand out to people in this arena) always ends up being asked to handle either the FOH Console, lighting console, or monitoring console for a song, or, even a set. Always.

If you walk in the door, entry level, knowing how everything works, it won't be long before you're behind a console for somebody. If you're good, chances are, down the line, someone will want to pick you up for their tour.

Live sound is where the "rock n' roll happens"; employees do flake out. If you're good at what you do; you'll be filling their spot when they disapear on a drug binge somewhere in bumblebutt, Missouri.

Honestly, not a bad idea.
If you want some flexible work while you're out here, PM me, and I'll dig through my business card drawer to see who's numbers I've got on hand.
Old 16th July 2006
  #143
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by emreyazgin
OK then, someone please suggest me an internship. Whoever industry professional i speak to they all talk the same "You are wasting your money @ SAE, you should do internship".... But whenever i say them "OK, give me a chance then.." they start going like "Emm..we currently don't employ interns...etc etc"....So should i give up? or just try and try for years until someone will let me be intern?
Ok- here's a straight answer. You've got the right idea that you're going to be an intern first- this is the way it is. I understand your frustration about how to find an internship- it's tough. Something to realize when you're looking for an internship- whoever is hiring you is sizing you up to see 1) are you just some punk that just thinks it would be cool to work in a studio (in which case they're either going to turn you away or put you on permanant trash detail), 2) can they trust you to not act improperly/ break things/ piss off clients/ act unprofessional in any way/ etc. 3) ARE YOU AN ASSET OR A LIABILITY TO THEIR BUSINESS. Realize these things along with the fact that you're a face in a long, long line of other people wanting in the doors as an intern, and you feel like you're staring up at a steep hill, right? Here's the secret: if you're looking for an internship, most studios don't care about your skills as an engineer HARDLY AT ALL. Knowing the difference between an sm57 and sm58, yes, but knowing how to record XYZ artist's next album? Not at all. Realize what this means- you don't have to know everything going into an intership- no one expects it. (The weight you're feeling about "I need to get a huge education before I do anything!!!!"- let that fall off your shoulders here). Here's the thing about getting an internship at a studio- you've got to show that you will be valuable to them. Show them enthusiasm. Show them willingness to do common chores and errands in exchange for the chance to start learning the ropes. MAKE YOURSELF AN ASSET TO THEM. Take pride in being the best tea boy you can for the time being- it will set you apart.

And that's the trick- getting yourself in the door, helping grease the wheelsat the studio, and once you've earned their trust you can start asking questions and thus your education starts. Now, keep in mind, you can't rely on an internship for a complete education- you'll have to look outside also. Get to reading- there's alot of good books on engineering (Huber and Runstein is a great one), and get yourself some kind of Pro Tools system to learn on at home. Nothing fancy needed- an Mbox with a basic Mac G4 (both used will be fine if you look around) will be affordable and get you a jump on learning computer recording. (and for all that's holy, don't let anyone talk you into buying Nuendo or another program! For better or worse, Pro Tools is the industry standard for computer based recording in major studios. It's like a native language- learn to speak the native toungue before you try another. Oh- if you can swing it, be sure to get a Mac. You'll run into Macs way more than PCs in pro studios- being a good assistant is knowing how to keep Macs happy and running!)

So there you go. This ended up with way more words than I thought it would, but hope it helps. Let me know how it goes- get out there, find a studio where you're comfortable, and go for it! No time like the presest! Best of luck to you

Cheers,
Steve
Old 16th July 2006
  #144
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by emreyazgin
OK then, someone please suggest me an internship. Whoever industry professional i speak to they all talk the same "You are wasting your money @ SAE, you should do internship".... But whenever i say them "OK, give me a chance then.." they start going like "Emm..we currently don't employ interns...etc etc"....So should i give up? or just try and try for years until someone will let me be intern?
And oh yeah- DON"T GIVE UP! BE TENACIOUS!!!
Old 16th July 2006
  #145
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by FSPirate
First off, I do realize that this topic doesn't come anywhere close to belonging in the "high end gear" forum, but I couldn't see it fitting in with "low end theory" or "mastering forum", either. However, I've come to trust the opinions of my fellow Gearslutterz, and therefore decided this was the website on which to pose my question.

I've already shot myself in the foot on this forum by mentioning that I am a FullSail student about to graduate, so I see no harm in mentioning it again. My big question, though, is why do I only hear negative stories about FullSail graduates? Believe me, I know there are some students here who have no people skills, minimal technical understanding, and a third grade vocabulary, yet are still somehow passing and are about to graduate. It's either a miracle or a tragedy, depending on your point of view. However, some of my classmates are good people and really know their stuff. I shudder to think that the entire industry distrusts the schooling we paid so much for, and worked so hard to get through. Is our reputatin really so bad that it handicaps the good students as well?

I've seen many negative references to FullSail graduates, and I'm just dying of curiousity over this question: Has anyone got a good story about a FullSailer? I'm not asking you to share them, persay, I'd just like a little reassurance that I didn't pay all this money for an education that comes with a purely terrible reputation.

So, in summary, my questions are:

Has anyone got a good story about a FullSail graduate?

Is our reputatin really so bad that it handicaps the good students as well?
If that is so, what can we do to quickly dispel this? Some of us will work hard no matter what, but if we can do something to beat the repuation a little sooner, we'll work hard at that, too.
Be careful about opinions about FS you read here. I've have nothing to do with Full Sail but after reading through all thesae threads I can say with total certainty that most people responding to your question negatively really dont know what they're talking about. It's mostly just second hand gossip.

Good luck,

Jim
Old 17th July 2006
  #146
Lives for gear
 

So what are the names of five great songs that have been produced or influenced by a graduate of one of these schools? Four Songs? Three? Two? One, can you name one GREAT song that these schools have had a part in producing? And if not, doesn't that suggest that the schools may be more a part of the problem than a part of the solution?

Oh well, at least the graduates of this type of school usually don't go on to become the ultimate in evil: the twenty-something MBA :-)

best,

john
Old 17th July 2006
  #147
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Harley-OIART's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney
So what are the names of five great songs that have been produced or influenced by a graduate of one of these schools? Four Songs? Three? Two? One, can you name one GREAT song that these schools have had a part in producing? And if not, doesn't that suggest that the schools may be more a part of the problem than a part of the solution?

Oh well, at least the graduates of this type of school usually don't go on to become the ultimate in evil: the twenty-something MBA :-)

best,

john
I can think of 3 Major Hit albums... but since ur obviously convinced 'these schools' are all the same and offer students little in the way of marketable skillsets, I won't bother namedropping.

Sorry but....
A good student will do well almost anywhere, and, not all audio schools leave students half trained for the real world.

-Scott
Old 17th July 2006
  #148
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney
So what are the names of five great songs that have been produced or influenced by a graduate of one of these schools? Four Songs? Three? Two? One, can you name one GREAT song that these schools have had a part in producing? And if not, doesn't that suggest that the schools may be more a part of the problem than a part of the solution?

Oh well, at least the graduates of this type of school usually don't go on to become the ultimate in evil: the twenty-something MBA :-)

best,

john
What's the name of one great song you've been involved with?

Jim
Old 17th July 2006
  #149
Lives for gear
 

I didn't ask for the names of hits, I asked for the names of great songs. As for great songs I've been involved with, I'm trying my best to (co-)write a few but I don't think a lyricist should claim their own work is great.

As for great performances that I've been privileged to record, I suppose the highlight would not be a song, rather it was a reading by Rita Dove of her poem, "Parsley" in the Lake Bowl tent (i.e. one of the small tents) at the last Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival. I used CAD 95s through a Crest XRM into an Alesis HD24 (the primary sound vendor provided the powered loudspeakers ). Sounded fine, but, other than putting together a sweet little rig, about the only thing I did that made a difference was to ride the house gain - ever so slightly - when one of the official golf-carts went by on the road above. The already written words made the performance. By the time Ms. Dove read them in the small venue I was running, I would guess that neither one of us could have done anything to enhance the experience. And fortunately, neither of us did anything to detract from the experience.

A memorable work, and a very difficult work to listen to. I can only imagine what Rita Dove had to go through to write it. It's an experience I will never forget. Interestingly, the person I co-write with also did sound for Rita Dove at a previous G. R. Dodge Poetry Fest (in the big venue) and her poem was the most memorable for him that year - but it was a different poem.
Old 18th July 2006
  #150
Lives for gear
 

...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney
So what are the names of five great songs that have been produced or influenced by a graduate of one of these schools? Four Songs? Three? Two? One, can you name one GREAT song that these schools have had a part in producing? And if not, doesn't that suggest that the schools may be more a part of the problem than a part of the solution?

Oh well, at least the graduates of this type of school usually don't go on to become the ultimate in evil: the twenty-something MBA :-)

best,

john

People don't go to these schools to become "producers"... At least Full Sail is for engineering....

And where the studios are in the school (Full Sail), there's plaques on the wall from albums graduates had worked on.... such as one of Madonna's albums, Jay-Z's Black Album.. One of Eminems albums.... Creed... SHAQ DIESEL MOFO... there's way more than I can remember cuz I haven't been in that building for a while....
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