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What should I do, going to SAE school, or getting a regular job?
Old 30th November 2011
  #1
What should I do, going to SAE school, or getting a regular job?

Hello, I am 24. I'am doing beats and I would like to be good at it like many of you. Making music on my computer is my passion. And becoming better is a great motivation.

Now I am at the end of my Psychology degree, I always wanted to do a Sound Degree, like the SAE Audio 24 months.

The thing is, I know that if i don't do SAE, I will have to find a full time job and do beatmaking on the evenings, when I won't be with my girlfriend.

If i go to the SAE School, I will have to pay 12 000 $ for two year of this music environment, with all what comes with SAE. And I will have to work on week ends to pay the school, and I will be in another city alone.

But ill have time to do beats again and again.

My goals is not so much to become a 100% mix engineer, but more a beatmaker/composer/(engineer).

Do you think the SAE school can help to become better in producing, beatmaking, connecting, developping your music business, or is it just a dream?

I have the opportunity to do it with a part time work. Should I do it?
Or should I keep my 12 000$ to buy more vinyl, more stuff for my personal studio?

Sorry for my bad english and thanks for your answers.
Old 30th November 2011
  #2
I say, don't go, do it on the side. You already have a decent degree, just work and do music on the side. It's not worth wasting your money.
Old 30th November 2011
  #3
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i think you need to be a little more specific as to what you want to do. Full Sail isn't going to teach you how to compose. And you don't want to engineer. So what exactly are you getting out of the tuition ?

Personally, those schools are a racket but that is my opinion. Will you learn ? Depends on how little you know. they cater to the lowest denominator. Their goal is to fill the class room.

If it isn't hard to get in, it isn't worth doing it.
Old 30th November 2011
  #4
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MonoBrow's Avatar
 

I went to SAE(long time ago) I was doing music before incl studio work.In Hamburg the tutors were great-skilled and always helpfull.
For me it was Worth it.If its worth it to you...only you can decide that.You need to work HARD.Sae cant teach you a great attitude.You have to bring it,then you will learn a LOT there.I ve seen people who did just the minimum to graduate...guess what?
Not 1 of these people works in Audio.The Guys that did extra and showed up all the time do ...as i can judge it great in multiple sektors in the industry.Post-Media-Recording-Own musik.Its about what you put in it and how much you want it.
Old 1st December 2011
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadforBrad View Post
i think you need to be a little more specific as to what you want to do. Full Sail isn't going to teach you how to compose. And you don't want to engineer. So what exactly are you getting out of the tuition ?

Personally, those schools are a racket but that is my opinion. Will you learn ? Depends on how little you know. they cater to the lowest denominator. Their goal is to fill the class room.

If it isn't hard to get in, it isn't worth doing it.
The thing is, I don't care so much about what job I could get, if at least it's related to music.

I mean, I could sell vinyl, i would be happy, if at least I have time beside that to progress in my music.

Out of the tuitition, I think I will get mixing skills, music contacts, great environment, a macbook, reduction on a lots of plug ins, the situation of being in Paris where there are more opportunity than in my small city.

But I know it's very expensive, so I have trouble to make this step...
Old 1st December 2011
  #6
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scruffydog's Avatar
I would say at 24 you have a year to kill...but not much more.
I think you can make contacts without entering an expensive audio school.
And i would say DON'T get hung up on having to attend a course to become good.
In a way i made that very mistake....most people i was playing with were at the Guildhall or Royal college and when i realised i was a little directionless...i enrolled myself....BIG mistake.
College was not for me....kind of put me off.
If you are at a loss what to do....just get some good work to start building the rest of your life and build up your music contacts and recording skills at a natural speed.
There is NO reason for not hooking up with who's who in your city very quickly if you get around and take part...
Old 1st December 2011
  #7
A big consideration is what kind of job do you want to have. I know a lot of graphic designers and engineers that survive entirely on freelance with no regular paycheck. That would give me a nervous breakdown. I like knowing where the money is coming from, hence a paycheck. Would you be happier with freelance or a steady job?
Old 1st December 2011
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by scruffydog View Post
I would say at 24 you have a year to kill...but not much more.
Why that? Since when doing good music is related to age? I mean, no offense, but I do not understand that point.
Old 1st December 2011
  #9
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scruffydog's Avatar
Well..24 or 44......music can take it all...
but building a sustainable income is not luck...it takes a certain amount of resignation to what might work...
if it starts to happen in music and you are awake enough to take the breaks then thats good...but this is not the way it pans out for 95% of would be's..
thats my point...
p.s...music is and always will be the most amazing thing...
Old 1st December 2011
  #10
and don't you guys think the SAE could be a boost, meeting people already in the field, being close to a lot of big studios. I feel like in my small town, nothing can be down locally.

+ I would like to make a part time job as a day-job, but I don't like what I can do with my psychology degrees, so I need anyways to do another degree.

By doing SAE, i'am afraid Ill have to choose between create music and engineering (mixing, recording etc) music
Old 1st December 2011
  #11
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Speologic View Post
and don't you guys think the SAE could be a boost, meeting people already in the field, being close to a lot of big studios. I feel like in my small town, nothing can be down locally.

+ I would like to make a part time job as a day-job, but I don't like what I can do with my psychology degrees, so I need anyways to do another degree.

By doing SAE, i'am afraid Ill have to choose between create music and engineering (mixing, recording etc) music
When you graduate SAE you are going to be in the same position as you are now, except now, the only difference is you can see what jobs you can do with your degree, with a sound degree the same cannot be said.

Just about everything can be studied to degree level nowadays, all this funding into education the politicians of yesterday said they'd put down and useless courses came out of it, quality is what we needed, quantity is what we got.

Anything you can do to make money at what you want to do with music cannot be learned at SAE or anywhere for that matter, it's who you know, 10 years from now the music industry is going to have changed multiple times and you are always going to have to be one step ahead, even those that come and make their money soon fade.
Old 1st December 2011
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by booob View Post
Anything you can do to make money at what you want to do with music cannot be learned at SAE or anywhere for that matter, it's who you know, 10 years from now the music industry is going to have changed multiple times and you are always going to have to be one step ahead, even those that come and make their money soon fade.
I agree, but studying SAE 2 years can give me time and good environnement to perfect my craft, better than the day-job/studio-night situation, don't you think?
Old 2nd December 2011
  #13
Being accepted as a new talent in the music business is all about your age.
Fact is, once you hit 30 it's much harder.
At 24 you've got a few years to get serious, at 26 everyone's going to say "what have you been doing since you left school" (18)?
The older you are, the more commitments you have to pay for, buying a flat, starting a family etc... People get going with their music careers between 18 and 25 because they can sleep on floors, go without food etc and they're not bringing that hardship on anyone else (girlfriend, wife, kids).

The music scene is ultra competitive.
If it's an equal choice between a guy who's been working on his music full time for four or five years and a guy who's been fitting it in around his psyche degree and his girlfriend, sadly the guy who seems more committed will probably get the nod.
There is nothing fair or common sense about the music business. In the end, the quality of your work opens the most doors, but if your work is not a class above your competition, you'll be in a straight fight with the other competition who might appear more passionate and committed.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #14
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If what you like is writing / make beats, I don't think SAE has a lot to give you. Learn some music theory, practice you song writing and computer programming skills. I don't think SAE offers something on those subjects. Find some artists near you who need songs and write with them. Try to place those song with some publishers if they are good.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #15
I know there is not so much chance that I can live on beatmaking full time, but I would like to be able to live doing beats, mixes, maybe studio sessions etc... THe perfect situation would be to have a job related to music part-time, and doing beat part time...
Old 2nd December 2011
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
Being accepted as a new talent in the music business is all about your age.
Fact is, once you hit 30 it's much harder.
At 24 you've got a few years to get serious, at 26 everyone's going to say "what have you been doing since you left school" (18)?
The older you are, the more commitments you have to pay for, buying a flat, starting a family etc... People get going with their music careers between 18 and 25 because they can sleep on floors, go without food etc and they're not bringing that hardship on anyone else (girlfriend, wife, kids).

The music scene is ultra competitive.
If it's an equal choice between a guy who's been working on his music full time for four or five years and a guy who's been fitting it in around his psyche degree and his girlfriend, sadly the guy who seems more committed will probably get the nod.
There is nothing fair or common sense about the music business. In the end, the quality of your work opens the most doors, but if your work is not a class above your competition, you'll be in a straight fight with the other competition who might appear more passionate and committed.

9th wonder made his nas album remix when he were 27. That was the beginning of his career.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #17
Like I said..... under 30.
And don't go looking for exceptions, because there will always be exceptions.
The thing is, the music industry generally demands passion, commitment and risk taking before success. So far you are frankly looking for ways not to put yourself on the line, or be away from your girlfriend, or not know where your next money is coming from.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
Like I said..... under 30.
And don't go looking for exceptions, because there will always be exceptions.
The thing is, the music industry generally demands passion, commitment and risk taking before success. So far you are frankly looking for ways not to put yourself on the line, or be away from your girlfriend, or not know where your next money is coming from.
So at the end, what advice would you give to me about my situation?
Old 2nd December 2011
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
Like I said..... under 30.
And don't go looking for exceptions, because there will always be exceptions.
The thing is, the music industry generally demands passion, commitment and risk taking before success. So far you are frankly looking for ways not to put yourself on the line, or be away from your girlfriend, or not know where your next money is coming from.
Acutally, I would say that, for me, going to SAE between 2 years is a risk, is a commitment, and is putting myself on the line. It's more a risk than getting a part time job and making music in the other part time.

Last edited by Speologic; 2nd December 2011 at 12:23 PM.. Reason: completing
Old 2nd December 2011
  #20
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KarmaPolice's Avatar
 

SAE only makes sense if you want a proper job as an engineer. Learning all that technical stuff for making music is a waste of time and money.

If you wanna be alone making music in another city, just do that, thats how Bob Dylan did it and its probably a great adventure anyway. You donยดt need SAE for that.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarmaPolice View Post
SAE only makes sense if you want a proper job as an engineer. Learning all that technical stuff for making music is a waste of time and money.

If you wanna be alone making music in another city, just do that, thats how Bob Dylan did it and its probably a great adventure anyway. You donยดt need SAE for that.
U right, but as today we make a lot of computer music, and a lot by ourself, learning technical stuff would be useful don't u think?

And whtt if after that, I could find a work related to music, not necessarily engineering, but something not so far, like in a radio.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #22
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I.R.Baboon's Avatar
The ONLY reason to do SAE is if you want a job that values it as a qualification, like working at a TV station or something.

If that's not your goal, DON'T do SAE!

Sure you might meet people there, but there's plenty of other, cheaper ways to network and find collabos.

By the way, if you stop making "beats" and start making "songs", you'll have more chance of success!

You write quite poorly, how in the world did you get a degree?

Everything you need to know is online, in forums, interviews etc - although i'd take youtube "experts" with a pinch of salt!
Old 2nd December 2011
  #23
Quote:
Originally Posted by I.R.Baboon View Post
The ONLY reason to do SAE is if you want a job that values it as a qualification, like working at a TV station or something.

If that's not your goal, DON'T do SAE!

Sure you might meet people there, but there's plenty of other, cheaper ways to network and find collabos.

By the way, if you stop making "beats" and start making "songs", you'll have more chance of success!

You write quite poorly, how in the world did you get a degree?

Everything you need to know is online, in forums, interviews etc - although i'd take youtube "experts" with a pince of salt!
Because I did my degree in my natural language, which is not english as you noticed.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #24
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I.R.Baboon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speologic View Post
Because I did my degree in my natural language, which is not english as you noticed.
OK! - then ignore that part of my post.

The rest was pure gold.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speologic View Post
So at the end, what advice would you give to me about my situation?
Do whatever you have to do financially to get on with your music career NOW.
For me it was moving to a music capital - London. Sleeping on the floor in a squat. Having no money to eat, having no work. Going to band auditions every week. If the girlfriend got in the way, the relationship ended.

If I had been you, my music career would have been well under way after 4 years studying Psych, although I went 100% into music at the age of 16 and didn't have a back up plan or non music qualification to fall back on.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speologic View Post
Acutally, I would say that, for me, going to SAE between 2 years is a risk, is a commitment, and is putting myself on the line.
This is why my posts have been more harsh than usual. You don't seem to grasp the real commitment you need to put in. Going on another course is another two years you put the responsibility of your music in the hands of others (SAE), and expect to be in a different spot than where you are now.
The four years you already spent at college was the time to develop your music, gain contacts, produce a body of work.
The time to attend SAE if at all was straight out of high school. Now you need to cement your musical style and rapidly build contacts in the real world, not the pseudo world of another college course.
Old 2nd December 2011
  #27
Chrisso, I really read every word you say, I know you know what you are talking about. But I discover my passion quite late (like 2-3 years ago so at the age of 20-21). And I wanted to finish my psychology degree before really trying musical things. I'am no 18 anymore, so if I can't make money with the music I make in some years, I will be stuck with a job I don't like. If I had an SAE degree in my pocket, and if I couldn't make money with my music, I could still find a job in a field I would like, radio/tv/live engineer, selling instruments, or whatever. But really, your words make me think.
Old 3rd December 2011
  #28
I'm not sure any SAE qualification will get you a job in radio.
Broadcasters tend to be focused on paper work more than anyone else in the music industry at large it's true, but overall it's the catalogue of work you can show, and the skills you can demonstrate that get you hired in the music industry.
It's what you know, who you know and what you can offer that your competition can't that gets you places, not what you have in diplomas and degrees.
Old 3rd December 2011
  #29
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I would go on and get a Masters in anything as it will get you much further.
A BS in Pysch is worthless in todays economy
Old 3rd December 2011
  #30
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanabit View Post
I would go on and get a Masters in anything as it will get you much further.
A BS in Pysch is worthless in todays economy
I think that any degree is worthless unless you REALLY love what you are doing. I'm dating this girl who got a Philosophy degree.

My first reaction was, "Oh, so straight to McDonald's after college." Then I thought, well that's a ****ing stupid attitude. She got the degree because she LOVED what she was studying.

That's what it's all about. It may not be practical if you aren't going to use the degree to get a job with it, but **** IT. You should LOVE what you are studying first, and job consideration should be second.
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