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My boss is a cheal motherf***er. Please give me some advice!!
Old 28th December 2010
  #1
Here for the gear
 

My boss is a cheal motherf***er. Please give me some advice!!

deleted original post for fear of being recognized... even though its highly unlikely.

The focal cms50 post in "The Moan Zone" sums up my feelings exactly. The guy has an assistant who never complains and does great work (that is me). The assistant has been working for him for 8 months and her boss is trying to buy her focal cms50s (granted, its because her father died, but still.. he said something along the lines of "she does great work and I want to show her its appreciated."

Ive never gotten any bonus from my job and get paid little more than minimum wage (been working as an assistant for 2 years now for the same person). It would take me weeks to work to get enough money to pay for focal cm50s.

So to any employers out there who like your employees... Dont undervalue the power of incentives. Give people a bonus every once in a while if you like their work
Old 28th December 2010
  #2
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maxpidge's Avatar
 

suck it up nancy.....
Old 28th December 2010
  #3
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thisisathrowaway View Post
Does it sound like I'm being taken advantage of?
Probably.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thisisathrowaway View Post
Is this a fair deal?
I guess you'd have to be the final judge for that. AFAIC, no, it's not a fair deal, but I'd wager a good amount of money that you could find 50 engineers on this board in a day that would do it for food and lodging.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thisisathrowaway View Post
Should I suck it up so that I can have this engineering gig on my resume?
Do you think having it will help you at all? How well known is the band? If you work one hour for cleanup, or a month, your credit is basically the same in the eyes of anyone but another engineer. If you feel like you'll be doing something on the record later on, that credit will be the same as if you spend the month tracking/etc.. I have a buddy who has a grammy because he subbed for me for a couple of hours. heh heh I do remind him of that though..... Honestly, credits are over-rated.

Do you dig the band's music? Like the guys? These all come in more important than credits for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thisisathrowaway View Post
Should I ask for more money? Or should I finally tell him to shove it?
How bad do you need the gig? Have you got freelance bookings? Really, you're the only one who can answer all these questions. It's doubtful that he's going to pay more from what you've said.

If you want to do it, do it. Don't complain another second though. Sounds as though you're not likely to get a raise or respect from your current employer though. Good luck with the decision.
Old 28th December 2010
  #4
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slaves666's Avatar
Don't bit the hand that feeds......

If you continue working on bands of that caliber, someone else will notice and you'll be the one getting the call. Be patient and enjoy the work.
Old 28th December 2010
  #5
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jchadstopherhuez's Avatar
 

if i were you...i'd post and ask for advice on a message board frequented by tons of engineer/producer/studio types throughout the world.

no way your "boss" would ever see your post and dump you in a second for the tens of thousands of other "engineers" who would die for the opportunity to work on projects like that.

you could probably find tons of local independent bands to pay you at least $15.00 per hour to record their master pieces. why waste your time being involved in projects with such small budgets like that ? i know of at least 4-5 bands here in the midwest that would hire you to work on their amazing new projects...and they all have budgets at least 1/60th of that paltry sum you are working with.

no one who is succesful in this business has EVER had to work for less than they are worth, and under more succesful folks who make much more money than them. no one.

and yes..this is sarcasm.

good luck with it.

best,

jchristopherhughes
Old 29th December 2010
  #6
Here for the gear
 

thanks for the advice slutz.

Though it may have seemed from my original post like I constantly complain to my boss, the opposite could not be more true. I always do what is asked, no questions, no complaints. I make myself available to do whatever work is necessary whenever asked, regardless of anything else going on in my life. The post was a result of 2 years of bottled up emotions and financial stress that has never been let out to anybody, let alone the person paying me haha.

That being said, I understand that a bunch of people would kill to be in the position Im in... In my defense, I wasn't just "handed" this job on a silver platter. Ive worked my ass off for years and years and years to acquire the skillset that I have now that has enabled me to do this work; Ive worked my ass of while at work to get to the position where I can have the opportunity in my original post presented to me.

I guess what I really wanted to know was the following... How important do you guys feel it is to stick to doing what is in your heart, to making music you support, to doing what you love, regardless of financial consequences? I have an amaaaaaazing opportunity and Im well aware of that (hell, Ive been working for an opportunity like this for a long ass time).

But, deep down, I don't like the music Im working on. I dont feel inspired. My greatest joy comes from making music, and by listening to the same record for a 8 months straight, the same songs over and over and over again, solely focusing on nitpicky things like vocal tuning, pocket, how clean everything is, etc. Im creating this mindset for myself that I find is completely contrary to the creative mindset that I love... The creative mindset that set me apart from enough of the other "thousands of engineers who would kill for my job" in order for me to actually land it. Does that make any sense?


Bahh... I just think to much....
Old 29th December 2010
  #7
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mixman499 View Post
if i were you...i'd post and ask for advice on a message board frequented by tons of engineer/producer/studio types throughout the world.

no way your "boss" would ever see your post and dump you in a second for the tens of thousands of other "engineers" who would die for the opportunity to work on projects like that.
Boss doesnt go on GearSlutz (he is computer illiterate and the technicalities of music mean nothing to him). Im frustrated, not stupid haha.

Also, even if he did find my post, Im 99% sure that I would not be "dumped." Im good at what I do, and Im very good friends with my employer (which makes it all the more annoying/weird of a situation).

Obviously in my original post I sounded like I have my head up my ass and that Im a dime a dozen. But again, as much as this may sound conceited, I'm absolutely not a "dispensable" resource in this equation. My employer's career blossomed after he we started working together. There may be thousands whod kill for my job, but I think I have a pretty specialized skillset that is a rare find amongst engineers (Im hardly solely an engineer, and I have worked with enough people to know that there aren't a lot of people who could fill my position...).
Old 29th December 2010
  #8
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jchadstopherhuez's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thisisathrowaway View Post
t
But, deep down, I don't like the music Im working on. I dont feel inspired. My greatest joy comes from making music, and by listening to the same record for a 8 months straight, the same songs over and over and over again, solely focusing on nitpicky things like vocal tuning, pocket, how clean everything is, etc. Im creating this mindset for myself that I find is completely contrary to the creative mindset that I love... The creative mindset that set me apart from enough of the other "thousands of engineers who would kill for my job" in order for me to actually land it. Does that make any sense?

had this paragraph been included in your original post...my reply would have been much different.

i've been there. exactly there. i spent about 4 years doing those type of projects...spending days just editing, tuning, trying to make musicians who had no business playing...sound like they could actually play...or..in all honesty..just replaying the parts by myself at 3 am alone in a studio that we were paying a grand a day for...because, ultimately..my SANITY was at stake, and it was just easier and more efficient to just replay something than try to piece it together with hours of edits.

one day i realized that i had become a computer operator. that is not why i got into this gig. i am a musician first. since age 5. i love making records. i can remember the moment a few years back when i was working on a "demo deal" project for a major label with some nameless, throwaway modern rock band...engineering for a producer with hit record credentials...in my case, actually getting paid fairly well...a few (well more than a few) hundred bucks a day....but LOOONNNGGGG DAYS. endless, as a matter of fact. many nights sleeping on blankets in an iso booth, or the studio couch. surviving on espresso and adrenelin.

from a gearslutz point of view...it was probably the perfect gig. working in a huge commercial room, funded by a major label, tons of cool gear, giant console, cartage companies dropping off amazing gear that often just sat to look impressive. typical modern rock major label production... spend a day with amazing rental kit getting great sounds....record not so great drummer with hundred dollar haircut of the week to a click....(that he swears is speeding up or slowing down)...spend next day editing drums...and eventually laying on samples to cover up the sounds we spent time getting...track bass...edit...track guitars...edit, time compress, tuning..etc.etc. vocals ? oh god...weeks to get something usable.

at the end of a day..i'd realize that i had not heard a single [email protected]#$ song all the way through one [email protected]#$# time. a&r dbags stopping in with starbucks latte and too cool for school attitude..."play me what you got so far....but...ONLY if it has been beat detectived and autotuned (sic)" at the end of it all...probably less thn 10% of the projects i worked on were even released.

realizing i hate this gig. and so...i changed. went totally solo...and focused on working with real bands. i make probably less in a single year than i made often in a few months back in those days. but i've made records i am proud of...and will listen to. i try to work with bands and artists that can actually play and sing. i try to work with musicians who will always want to try again before having me edit or tune something. and above all...i try to work with good PEOPLE. when the bills show up...i can't say that i don't sometimes miss those large paychecks....but i make it somehow.

all in all...money is not everything. sanity...love...passion...enjoyment....THAT is what you need to balance.

if you hate the gig....do something else. period.

you gotta make some $ to survive...but you are not surviving if you hate what you do. only you can set the criteria for loving or hating something in your life.

best of luck,

jchristopherhughes
Old 29th December 2010
  #9
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
i spent about 4 years doing those type of projects...spending days just editing, tuning, trying to make musicians who had no business playing...sound like they could actually play...or..in all honesty..just replaying the parts by myself at 3 am alone in a studio that we were paying a grand a day for...because, ultimately..my SANITY was at stake, and it was just easier and more efficient to just replay something than try to piece it together with hours of edits.
My god. That is me to a T. I legitimately have chills haha. Im literally going INSANE doing my work.

To make matters worse, my boss actually LOVES to spend the absolute least amount of time tracking possible because he knows I will end up fixing it (and will make it sound better than anybody could ever play it anyways). In addition, it means less time for him to actually have to listen to the ****ty music (he has zero regard for how taxing it is to clean up things that have been so half-assedly tracked and recorded..).

If i was making a couple bills a day, Id have no problem doing it for a little while! But for 10$/hr... Its ****e! I hate music now (well not really, but you know...)! And ive hated music for a while... Ive just finally realized the extent to which this work is affecting my brain. Ive been off work for 2 weeks, and I still get that "buzz" in my head a little bit every day... Its like my brain is mush... The only way I can describe how it feels is literally "bzzzzzzzzzzz" non-stop in my head. Its absolutely a residual effect of weeks straight in the studio doing that horrible clean-up work. Maybe you know what Im talking about. Nothing else has made my brain feel this way except for 3 weeks straight of clean-up work. Its very not-human feeling.

Bahh... Anyways, such a relief to hear that Im not alone. Im gonna suck it up and engineer this record, and hope that it signifies a change in my duties for my boss. If not, looks like Im going to be looking for a new job.

Any advice from your experience of stopping that 4-years of work and moving on to something new?


EDIT: Maybe I never mentioned this, but all this clean-up work repeatedly ends up being around finals time for me (Im a college student), and I still am never given days off to study, or work on papers, yada yada. It gets pretty stressful, coming home after blasting my brain with clean-up work, then being expected to write a 10 page essay due the next day, that I haven't had time to work on due to being in the studio all the time. So, maybe my feelings are partially a result of being overworked as well as being disenchanted in the actual music Im working on
Old 30th December 2010
  #10
Gear Head
 

Renegociate with your boss. everything. take it or leave it. Sooner or later.
careful pick the moment. the rest is what it should be. one way or another.

now u're on x-roads, if u'll stay u'll get use to it, in time u'll not be involved that much and one day u'll wake up and u'll go to JOB. routine. for $. period.
alternatif B mixman alredy explained to you.
anyway, the moment of truth is -as always- after. after quitting/ be fired, both u and your boss will find out who lost more.

Don't leave school.

last 2 posts (yours and mixman's), were a hell of a slice of life.
more or less been there... more on 2nd guess.
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