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Recording your own band?? They driving me crazy
Old 19th November 2009
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Recording your own band?? They driving me crazy

Anyone else had problems with this? It's either endless takes or endless things that should be fixed or changed. But hey since we are not paying for this it's ok. Can't even tell if our songs are any good anymore since i've listened to them 10000 times.

So here's a tip, never engineer your own band's music.
Old 19th November 2009
  #2
Gear Addict
 
lettenmusic's Avatar
 

Engineering I think is okay, just set some limits really, especially if the studio time is free. Mixing your own bands stuff, now that is something I will never do again.
Old 19th November 2009
  #3
Gear Nut
 

I cannot tell you how much i get annoyed by this. I get at least 1 band a week asking me to mix their horrible home recording. There is always way to many tracks and they have no idea what's what. They dont even know what they recorded half the time.
I posted my own very very long rant on this a couple weeks ago. Didn't go over to well, people really get a little upset when you tell them why they shouldn't engineer a record at home with no experience on horrible gear and then ask you to fix it or make it radio ready.
Old 19th November 2009
  #4
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Infernal Device's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyc View Post
Anyone else had problems with this? It's either endless takes or endless things that should be fixed or changed. But hey since we are not paying for this it's ok. Can't even tell if our songs are any good anymore since i've listened to them 10000 times.

So here's a tip, never engineer your own band's music.
Nothing is free. If it does not cost money, it costs your time. How much is that worth?

Sorry it is not going well, but this exactly why the home recording trend will end soon. Too many stories like this. I know MANY artists that would rather have root canal than make another album themselves.

Maybe this isn't at a home studio, in that case put your foot down with them.
Old 19th November 2009
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
packagebear's Avatar
 

amen to that...

It;s usually only the singer in one of the bands i'm in that loves doing a million takes. At a certain point I tell him to either get it together or I'll just do his parts..

It's definitely a labor of love doing your own band. But i'm far too much a control freak to hand over the reigns to someone else.. Maybe someday
Old 19th November 2009
  #6
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illacov's Avatar
 

Talking

Everytime I record my band its mostly fun.

I am truly blessed to have some generally nice guys in my band, The Goonies. I always look forward to the next session!

Then again we do alot of session work for other people, so its actually a rare scenario where we're just working on our own shit.

That might explain it a little better.

Peace
Illumination
Old 19th November 2009
  #7
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PhilR's Avatar
 

I'm generally okay recording my own bands stuff so long as I don't spend too much time listening to it in between tracking sessions before the final mix.
Old 19th November 2009
  #8
80425
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infernal Device View Post
this exactly why the home recording trend will end soon.
WRONG. You'll be eating that shit up in five years no doubt about it!!!!

Anyway I've been recording my own stuff for years,at home and in professional studios around chicago thanks, and yes @ first it's generally not pretty. But with time,concentration,knowledge, & undeniable patience it's possible to make a good recording. (did I mention equipment as well?)

I do agree that mixing your own material can be a real pain-it's usually best at this point to let someone with another perspective to make it shine, but by no means should this prohibit the artist from trying &/or practicing this art.It's generally the naive inexperience musicians who have these crazy expectations of turning shit to gold,however its the engineer's challenge to do the best they can instead of being lazy & bitching about all the work they have to do because they're in a tiff that the studios no longer hold the power that they once used to. dfegad
Old 19th November 2009
  #9
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AURORA4DTH View Post
I cannot tell you how much i get annoyed by this. I get at least 1 band a week asking me to mix their horrible home recording. There is always way to many tracks and they have no idea what's what. They dont even know what they recorded half the time.
I posted my own very very long rant on this a couple weeks ago. Didn't go over to well, people really get a little upset when you tell them why they shouldn't engineer a record at home with no experience on horrible gear and then ask you to fix it or make it radio ready.

NOT AGAIN! (just kiddin')

s
Old 19th November 2009
  #10
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slaves666's Avatar
I record both bands I play with. My problem is, cuz I know the sound of my stuff so well...It's hard to get perspective sometimes....so I work fast and efficient, that way it's always fresh....

As far as dealing with personalities....since it's my studio....my way wins.
Old 19th November 2009
  #11
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_headphones View Post
WRONG. You'll be eating that shit up in five years no doubt about it!!!!

Anyway I've been recording my own stuff for years,at home and in professional studios around chicago thanks, and yes @ first it's generally not pretty. But with time,concentration,knowledge, & undeniable patience it's possible to make a good recording. (did I mention equipment as well?)

I do agree that mixing your own material can be a real pain-it's usually best at this point to let someone with another perspective to make it shine, but by no means should this prohibit the artist from trying &/or practicing this art.It's generally the naive inexperience musicians who have these crazy expectations of turning shit to gold,however its the engineer's challenge to do the best they can instead of being lazy & bitching about all the work they have to do because they're in a tiff that the studios no longer hold the power that they once used to. dfegad

agree. the reward is so great. one day you'll look back and hear where you've improved. personally i think all the big shots do the same thing, they just don't like to admit it... snicker snicker... ( ---totally meant as a light hearted comment.)

don't quit now!

s
Old 20th November 2009
  #12
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Infernal Device's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_headphones View Post
But with time,concentration,knowledge, & undeniable patience it's possible to make a good recording. (did I mention equipment as well?)
Those are things that most (not all) bands who record themselves lack. I have friends who "DIY" and it rocks. Many I see (again, not all) do it themselves because they are lazy and/or controlling. Months spent on a product that never moves, and the band ends up fighting.

I think home recording has helped a lot. There are those who thrive and get better and are getting closer to making a record people will buy (besides their friends), but many stories like the poster mentioned are helping my business. Having one/two guys in the band that are "in the know" with stuff are usually much more easy with whom to work.

But in the end, as long as you are having fun!!
Old 20th November 2009
  #13
Gear Maniac
 
Ddjembe Mutombo's Avatar
 

I record all of my bands songs. We are actually recording 4 more demos. I don't do it at home since I don't have the gear. Since I am in college still and work at the edit suites in the communication school, I have unlimited time in the PT HD studio with a wonderful selection of high end mics. I wish they had better pres than the C|24 though. I track all the guitar and bass takes since I know how I like them and I play the tightest. Our drummer is pretty damn good. On these recordings he played his parts solely to a click... no backing tracks. The singer is good and can usually knock out a whole song in an hour.

I write almost all the guitar parts and the structures of the songs. Half of the lyrics as well. The only problem that I have with recording them it that they don't listen to me sometimes even when I know what the **** is up. Like on these recordings, they had to have the snare crackly and shit... not dampened in the slightest. I told them to put a ring on it because it would sound much better in the final product, but they put it on and hit it and said is sounded terrible and through out the ring. I know specifically with the head we used that a ring would have made it sound miles better in the finished product. Also I proposed a couple changes in a few songs and they just said "the song is good as is, it doesn't need change" even though I know that removing the prechorus' and adjusting the last chorus would completely help the flow of the song and make it sound much more professional. I even wrote the damned thing...

Even though there are a few downsides, they usually give me a lot of freedom as well. I can also produce a better product than these studios around here that charge less that 45 an hour. I also know how I want my guitars to sound. I like my cymbals and guitars loud. Most mixing engineers will usually do drums and vocals loud which totally kills the vibe of our music.

Finally, I thought I would add, never mix/record/master/etc someone else's material for free. I have volunteered myself a couple times and it always comes out bad. People always try to get you to do extra work that you didn't offer. One time I said I would mix a couple of a band's demos for free to boost my portfolio. They ended up trying to put an entire EP on me and also wanted me to edit their tracks. Minor editing is ok, but the drummer had way too many off fills, the bassist and guitarist were speeding up and slowing down. everything was a mess. I ended up not doing any editing, giving them a mix of one song and cutting the rest off.

Another time, I offered to record someone I thought had good music. you know, just a couple demos. We get into the school studio and the kid lays track on track on me. He was planning on recording at least 16 tracks. I had to sit him down after 9 and explain to him that I didn't have the time to give him a decent product for 16 tracks. I could probably only handle five. Luckily he took it well and we are finishing up the rest of the instruments this weekend.

I hope this read was enjoyable.
Old 20th November 2009
  #14
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We were mostly doing raw tracks to save money, thought about mixing it but eventually had to say enough is enough and hopefully we got enough good stuff to get it mixed somewhere good for a decent price, definitely is a time vs cost that you need to balance. I think some fresh ears will be a benefit. In general I think it's more a preparation thing when doing things for free, either for your friends or your band. When you are paying $50/hr people get their s*** together a lot faster.

Seems all good and I'm relieved to be done. Thanks for listening
Old 20th November 2009
  #15
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dysenterygary's Avatar
 

Why would you not like to record your band?? I am the "engineer" and then 3 of us are the "producers" we generally always agree on stuff and if something sucks, it sucks! Do it again! Maybe I'm lucky that we're all generally easy going guys, and of course we're all over critical of our own parts, but the majority rules and that keeps things flowing smoothly. I guess I just find this thread strange because all of the members of my band LOVE recording, its easy to impress kids at the shows, but when you can impress yourself in the studio then thats pretty satisfying.
Old 20th November 2009
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
Ddjembe Mutombo's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dysentarygary View Post
Why would you not like to record your band?? I am the "engineer" and then 3 of us are the "producers" we generally always agree on stuff and if something sucks, it sucks! Do it again! Maybe I'm lucky that we're all generally easy going guys, and of course we're all over critical of our own parts, but the majority rules and that keeps things flowing smoothly. I guess I just find this thread strange because all of the members of my band LOVE recording, its easy to impress kids at the shows, but when you can impress yourself in the studio then thats pretty satisfying.
I feel like taking a producer position is more than just saying something "sucks", but more-so seeing of how to make something sell. How to make choruses sound bigger, how to improve the flow of a song, how to add additional texture to segments of the song, etc. Most people don't understand that; this is why I have such a hard time producing my own bands songs because they are so set with what they are already doing.
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