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20k for an 128 ch Pro Tools rig is a bit too much in 2020
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Lives for gear
20k for an 128 ch Pro Tools rig is a bit too much in 2020

I understand that everybody likes profit, but i think in 2020 it's a bit too much to charge that amount of money for a simple feature.

The guys from Avid did a pretty good job at it. First of all, they limited the native version to 64 ch, so you need to get the Pro Tools Ultimate HDX. Maybe i need a card with DSP, maybe i don't. That should be up to me.

The 3660 eur HDX PICe card is the only option. Problem is that it only has 64 ch, so you need 2. Not only that, but the only way to get some audio out of those things is to buy another couple of Avid interfaces.

The generous offer consists in an average interface that costs 5k and a superb top of the line unit that is really a re branded and overpriced DAD unit.

How much more expensive would have been to throw a couple of madi or dante i/o's on the DSP card itself? Is it too big of a technical challenge? Or maybe change a couple of lines in the code for the native version and click enable 128 tracks?

My guess is this kind of greed is what's going to kick them back as other Daw's are getting more and get more accepted in the industry. It's time for this monopoly to end, it's doing no good for the consumers.

Just as a comparison, a similar Nuendo based system is under 3k.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
It’s not 128ch, it’s 128i/o that’s limited.

If you have that requirement for IO...you’re a big facility! (Most tracking rooms have a max of 48io, so one HDX card is fine).

It’s all about guaranteed playback and stability. If you’re running 128io, you’re likely to have an orchestra recording. You don’t want your computer rig to stumble. You want DSP assistance.

The HDIOs are far from average. And you don’t HAVE to buy those - you can buy 3rd party options if you prefer.

Ultimately, it’s a professional product pitched at professional facilities. At a professional price.

I’m not going to defend the slightly farcical situation of licenses, but I think the hardware pricing is fine. Any studio needing 128 inputs probably has 100k worth of preamps...right? It’s just on par for what the rest of your setup is.

But hey, if you’d rather Nuendo...the choice is yours!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 

As stated above, probably anyone who needs it already has it however there are inexpensive ways to get to the same place. You can use any DAW app you want and take the stems and mix out as broadcast wave files into Pro Tools native (which is cripled to 32 physical I/O) for Pro Tools deliverables (individual tracks also but you would then need multiple passes to get to higher counts). As for the hardware end of it I gave one solution for very high physical channel counts for a few thousand dollars in another recent thread. Below is a copy of that.



"So the OP basically needs a high channel count of decent converters running at 44.1k/48k sample rate for a low cost per channel solution. OP also wants to use a RME interface for their very low latency at full load proven performance. You are running a hybrid workflow with loads of outboard that all needs to be tied in.

You can do the above for the least money running RME ADAT interfaces instead of Madi that you are asking about as a used Raydat PCIe is 32 channels and likely you can find two of them used for less than a used RME Madi card (same amount of channels). Even less expensive is using the older RME 9652 PCI cards (24 channels each, use newer version with 2 midi I/O, not the Digi version) as they are now $200-$300 used. You can use 3 of them in a computer at a time for 72 channels and can use them in a PCIe slot with a cheap $30 adapter card (but will likely need to mod your case as they will then sit higher) and they have wordclock I/O (Raydat wordclock is a bit more complicated and you are limited to 2 cards for a total of 64 channels). So if you use a RME ADAT interface instead of Madi you will get the same or more for less cost (moving high channel count audio in and out of the computer at very low latency) as quality is exactly the same. Now running ADAT will also give you more options of high channel count converters to choose from including lower cost options.

Here is an option to research for the rest of what you need. Picking up a used Yamaha PM1D system for a couple thousand and using it WITHOUT the mixer board / controller surface (dont even buy that part if you don't have to or resell just that) as you can run the modular system without it from a simple low horsepower laptop (or add the app to your existing studio computer) as the mixer control surface just gives fader/knob/button control of the app. This was Yamaha's prior top dog system that started at $110k for a basic system that was used for A-list major tours, London West End and Broadway theatre main systems, and mega church installs. A few of these systems are now showing up stupid cheap as digital tech has SORT OF moved on with higher sample rates and smaller, lighter construction.

So this is the Yamaha PM1D in a nutshell for studio usage. Its a collection of rack mounted modules centered around a rack mounted Brain module(s). The system is completely redundant, just hook up another Brain and/or add modules so if any part breaks you can continue (think about that need for it's other than studio usage). The modules can be 200 meters apart and none need to be in the control room. There are two versions of the Brain module, the DSP1D and the DSP1D-EX which adds an internal card that doubles it's capacity. Either would work for your use but here is what the EX version allows per Brain module: 320 input channels connected / 192 output channels connected / 96 mono input channels assigned / 8 stereo input channels assigned / 48 mix channels (busses) / 24 matrix channels / two 2 buss stereo channels / 96 inserts / yada yada yada more than you need lol.

There are several different Input modules available but each will allow 32 analog connections per input module. This module is configured for remote controlled mic pres, balanced line ins, and has the A to D converters. The Ouput module is 32 balanced analog line outs and contains the D to A converters. Then there is a Digital module which has 8 slots for most of the available Yamaha MY8 cards. This is your digital I/O of your choice that you would use to connect to your DAW interface (ADAT/AES/Tascam/Madi-limited channel count per card/and additional converter to-from analog card options). You get 8 channels per card so a Digital module filled with eight MY8-AT ADAT cards would give you 64 channels I/O to your RME ADAT interface(s).

Now the Brain module is it's own computer doing the work. The software app running on a USB cable attached computer or the control surface mixer or even using one of several compatible other digital mixers connected to the Brain module mearly controls functions (isn't doing the work), they allow you to route and control, the Brain module is doing the work. Routing is done via typical digital matrix assignments, thus you could connect racks of outboard gear to the Input and Output modules and the routing assignments would act as a patchbay. Besides rack gear patched into Input/Output modules you also have Yamaha's built in functions-plugs like EQ/comps/verbs/etc (while redundant if doing that inside the DAW its however useful for cues without the added latency of the DAW). While analog cues with attached analog effects will give you the lowest latency (think analog mixer with auxes), you can think of using using the PM1D's effects-plugs the same as using the DSP plugs on a Pro Tools HD system, less latency than going through the DAW with plugs for cues. You see where I'm going here for a low cost high channel count solution while using tons of outboard for a hybrid workflow (works pretty good if using an analog mixer too just for the converters). You could even have way more outboard channels than your DAW interface allows connected up and then just use the matrix switching to patch in whatever you want to use (the same as having additional physical patchbays and cables).

So basically a used PM1D system will give you an extreme high channel count of decent converters (but limited to 44.1k/48k sample rate), remote controlled high end mic pres, and a patchbay, all for stupid cheap money at this point in time. Manual PDF's and app software which will run on Windows 7 without any gear connected are free on net to grab and use for your research (completely figure out pros and cons to this option). Obviously there is much more to it than a simple forum post can cover so PM me your info if you want to discuss in depth details."
Old 2 weeks ago
  #5
Lives for gear
Thanks your your in depth reply, but that set-up is not what i'm looking for.
I need 128 i/o's (mistakenly referred to as ch in my op) because i was considering building an atmos room for home entertainment.
I'm not a big facility and no orchestras i ever recorded needed 128 ch.
It's a requirement from Dolby. I don't need any analog inputs or preamps, i don't need any analog outputs, just dante or madi.
With any DAW besides Pro Tools it can be done easily with just a PCIe Dante card. But for the moment only Nuendo has the protocol to communicate with the Dolby system .
I don't question the fact that there are facilities who benefit from the DSP, but for my case i can't help but wonder if it's worth paying 10x amount of money.
Technically i don't see using Nuendo being the limiting factor since CPU power in this times is pretty considerable.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmankr View Post
As stated above, probably anyone who needs it already has it however there are inexpensive ways to get to the same place. You can use any DAW app you want and take the stems and mix out as broadcast wave files into Pro Tools native (which is cripled to 32 physical I/O) for Pro Tools deliverables (individual tracks also but you would then need multiple passes to get to higher counts). As for the hardware end of it I gave one solution for very high physical channel counts for a few thousand dollars in another recent thread. Below is a copy of that.



"So the OP basically needs a high channel count of decent converters running at 44.1k/48k sample rate for a low cost per channel solution. OP also wants to use a RME interface for their very low latency at full load proven performance. You are running a hybrid workflow with loads of outboard that all needs to be tied in.

You can do the above for the least money running RME ADAT interfaces instead of Madi that you are asking about as a used Raydat PCIe is 32 channels and likely you can find two of them used for less than a used RME Madi card (same amount of channels). Even less expensive is using the older RME 9652 PCI cards (24 channels each, use newer version with 2 midi I/O, not the Digi version) as they are now $200-$300 used. You can use 3 of them in a computer at a time for 72 channels and can use them in a PCIe slot with a cheap $30 adapter card (but will likely need to mod your case as they will then sit higher) and they have wordclock I/O (Raydat wordclock is a bit more complicated and you are limited to 2 cards for a total of 64 channels). So if you use a RME ADAT interface instead of Madi you will get the same or more for less cost (moving high channel count audio in and out of the computer at very low latency) as quality is exactly the same. Now running ADAT will also give you more options of high channel count converters to choose from including lower cost options.

Here is an option to research for the rest of what you need. Picking up a used Yamaha PM1D system for a couple thousand and using it WITHOUT the mixer board / controller surface (dont even buy that part if you don't have to or resell just that) as you can run the modular system without it from a simple low horsepower laptop (or add the app to your existing studio computer) as the mixer control surface just gives fader/knob/button control of the app. This was Yamaha's prior top dog system that started at $110k for a basic system that was used for A-list major tours, London West End and Broadway theatre main systems, and mega church installs. A few of these systems are now showing up stupid cheap as digital tech has SORT OF moved on with higher sample rates and smaller, lighter construction.

So this is the Yamaha PM1D in a nutshell for studio usage. Its a collection of rack mounted modules centered around a rack mounted Brain module(s). The system is completely redundant, just hook up another Brain and/or add modules so if any part breaks you can continue (think about that need for it's other than studio usage). The modules can be 200 meters apart and none need to be in the control room. There are two versions of the Brain module, the DSP1D and the DSP1D-EX which adds an internal card that doubles it's capacity. Either would work for your use but here is what the EX version allows per Brain module: 320 input channels connected / 192 output channels connected / 96 mono input channels assigned / 8 stereo input channels assigned / 48 mix channels (busses) / 24 matrix channels / two 2 buss stereo channels / 96 inserts / yada yada yada more than you need lol.

There are several different Input modules available but each will allow 32 analog connections per input module. This module is configured for remote controlled mic pres, balanced line ins, and has the A to D converters. The Ouput module is 32 balanced analog line outs and contains the D to A converters. Then there is a Digital module which has 8 slots for most of the available Yamaha MY8 cards. This is your digital I/O of your choice that you would use to connect to your DAW interface (ADAT/AES/Tascam/Madi-limited channel count per card/and additional converter to-from analog card options). You get 8 channels per card so a Digital module filled with eight MY8-AT ADAT cards would give you 64 channels I/O to your RME ADAT interface(s).

Now the Brain module is it's own computer doing the work. The software app running on a USB cable attached computer or the control surface mixer or even using one of several compatible other digital mixers connected to the Brain module mearly controls functions (isn't doing the work), they allow you to route and control, the Brain module is doing the work. Routing is done via typical digital matrix assignments, thus you could connect racks of outboard gear to the Input and Output modules and the routing assignments would act as a patchbay. Besides rack gear patched into Input/Output modules you also have Yamaha's built in functions-plugs like EQ/comps/verbs/etc (while redundant if doing that inside the DAW its however useful for cues without the added latency of the DAW). While analog cues with attached analog effects will give you the lowest latency (think analog mixer with auxes), you can think of using using the PM1D's effects-plugs the same as using the DSP plugs on a Pro Tools HD system, less latency than going through the DAW with plugs for cues. You see where I'm going here for a low cost high channel count solution while using tons of outboard for a hybrid workflow (works pretty good if using an analog mixer too just for the converters). You could even have way more outboard channels than your DAW interface allows connected up and then just use the matrix switching to patch in whatever you want to use (the same as having additional physical patchbays and cables).

So basically a used PM1D system will give you an extreme high channel count of decent converters (but limited to 44.1k/48k sample rate), remote controlled high end mic pres, and a patchbay, all for stupid cheap money at this point in time. Manual PDF's and app software which will run on Windows 7 without any gear connected are free on net to grab and use for your research (completely figure out pros and cons to this option). Obviously there is much more to it than a simple forum post can cover so PM me your info if you want to discuss in depth details."
Old 2 weeks ago
  #6
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrc View Post
i was considering building an atmos room for home entertainment.
I'm not a big facility and no orchestras i ever recorded needed 128 ch.
It's a requirement from Dolby. I don't need any analog inputs or preamps, i don't need any analog outputs, just dante or madi.
What do you mean by "home entertainment" though?

You actually don't literally need all 128 channels for Atmos as far as I know, you need a certain minimum which is lower. But that's for mixing and mastering to Atmos.. or "working with" Atmos I should probably say.

If you're looking at setting up a home entertainment system there are other requirements.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrc View Post
Thanks your your in depth reply, but that set-up is not what i'm looking for.
I need 128 i/o's (mistakenly referred to as ch in my op) because i was considering building an atmos room for home entertainment.
I'm not a big facility and no orchestras i ever recorded needed 128 ch.
It's a requirement from Dolby. I don't need any analog inputs or preamps, i don't need any analog outputs, just dante or madi.
With any DAW besides Pro Tools it can be done easily with just a PCIe Dante card. But for the moment only Nuendo has the protocol to communicate with the Dolby system .
I don't question the fact that there are facilities who benefit from the DSP, but for my case i can't help but wonder if it's worth paying 10x amount of money.
Technically i don't see using Nuendo being the limiting factor since CPU power in this times is pretty considerable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiasnyc View Post
What do you mean by "home entertainment" though?

You actually don't literally need all 128 channels for Atmos as far as I know, you need a certain minimum which is lower. But that's for mixing and mastering to Atmos.. or "working with" Atmos I should probably say.

If you're looking at setting up a home entertainment system there are other requirements.
Yeah I'm a little confused too. If you're just building a room for entertainment, does it matter what your playback DAW is? you don't need the DSP as you say.

As to the cost...how much does it cost to have 128 playback devices in the room?! Apologies if I'm naive as to how this all works! And a properly built Dolby room would make the cost of the playback rig insignificant wouldn't it?

The short version is that what you're wanting to do is fairly unique...so you'll probably find suitable options thin on the ground!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrc View Post
for the moment only Nuendo has the protocol to communicate with the Dolby system .
And the above surely is incorrect.

Nuendo is great though.

Also, likely more talk about gear for Atmos in the Post Production section. Here are two recent threads:

I have a dumb question about Dante/HDX/Atmos/RMU

Metric Halo as Atmos controller?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
Lives for gear
Dolby has 2 types of accreditation, Theater and Home Entertainment.
I was thinking of building a mixing room that meets the Home Entertainment requirements because i don't have the budget to build the huge room needed for Theatrical accreditation.
With the Home Entertainment licence i won't be able to work on motion pictures for cinema, only for streaming services, mobile devices, vr, blue ray etc.

The system needs 2 workstations, one for the DAW, and one that runs the Dolby Atmos Renderer software.
The 128 i/o s are needed to send audio from the DAW to the Atmos Renderer and back. Also, an Atmos capable DAW is needed and currently only Pro Tools and Nuendo have this option.

This is not as unique as it seems, all facilities with Dolby Atmos accreditation must meet the 128 i/o requirements.






Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Yeah I'm a little confused too. If you're just building a room for entertainment, does it matter what your playback DAW is? you don't need the DSP as you say.

As to the cost...how much does it cost to have 128 playback devices in the room?! Apologies if I'm naive as to how this all works! And a properly built Dolby room would make the cost of the playback rig insignificant wouldn't it?

The short version is that what you're wanting to do is fairly unique...so you'll probably find suitable options thin on the ground!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
Lives for gear
Maybe i'm wrong, but i was under the impression that only Pro Tools and Nuendo have Atmos integration.
But this won't change my situation that much, my dilemma is if it's worth investing in the Pro Tools rig since a similar setup can be done 10x cheaper with any other DAW that has Atmos support.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiasnyc View Post
And the above surely is incorrect.

Nuendo is great though.

Also, likely more talk about gear for Atmos in the Post Production section. Here are two recent threads:

I have a dumb question about Dante/HDX/Atmos/RMU

Metric Halo as Atmos controller?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #11
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrc View Post
Dolby has 2 types of accreditation, Theater and Home Entertainment.
I was thinking of building a mixing room that meets the Home Entertainment requirements because i don't have the budget to build the huge room needed for Theatrical accreditation.
With the Home Entertainment licence i won't be able to work on motion pictures for cinema, only for streaming services, mobile devices, vr, blue ray etc.
Well, you'd be able to literally work on motion pictures but you wouldn't be able to 'printmaster' them, as far as I understand it. In other words a home setup would allow you to create beds and objects but it would all be subject to the non-cinema output. But you could I think look at all of that as a pre-mix and move the entire session into a rented Atmos certified stage and then finalize there.

From a financial perspective that seems viable for a lot of productions. Spend time in a well set up smaller Atmos room and move to a professional certified stage for the final.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrc View Post
Maybe i'm wrong, but i was under the impression that only Pro Tools and Nuendo have Atmos integration.
I only read that you wrote "only Nuendo", not both. That's what I was addressing.

And for what it's worth I think Blackmagicdesign's Davinci Resolve also integrates object panning and Atmos 'communication', though I haven't looked into that particularly in depth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrc View Post
But this won't change my situation that much, my dilemma is if it's worth investing in the Pro Tools rig since a similar setup can be done 10x cheaper with any other DAW that has Atmos support.
Well, I mean, what do you want to do? Do you want to just play around or do you want to make money off of it?

Certainly Nuendo can be an option if the savings are worth it. The other 9x money could go to acoustic treatment or the playback system.

On the other hand if you intend to move your mixes onto a mix stage you need to be compatible with whatever stage that's going to be. In addition if you need to rely on subcontractors to do some of the work, for example dialog editing, then you might be better off using what they use.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #12
Lives for gear
Thanks a lot for your help!

Could you please tell me what are you opinions on the following setup?

Would it be a good idea to have an 128 i/o's Nuendo setup complemented by a 64 i/o's native Pro Tools rig?

That would still save a lot of money and i m pretty sure that one can get by working with 64 i/o's when Pro Tools compatibility is necessary.

Like you said, i'd rather invest that money in room treatment and better speakers, and that's going to make a huge difference for sure.

Thanks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiasnyc View Post
Well, you'd be able to literally work on motion pictures but you wouldn't be able to 'printmaster' them, as far as I understand it. In other words a home setup would allow you to create beds and objects but it would all be subject to the non-cinema output. But you could I think look at all of that as a pre-mix and move the entire session into a rented Atmos certified stage and then finalize there.

From a financial perspective that seems viable for a lot of productions. Spend time in a well set up smaller Atmos room and move to a professional certified stage for the final.



I only read that you wrote "only Nuendo", not both. That's what I was addressing.

And for what it's worth I think Blackmagicdesign's Davinci Resolve also integrates object panning and Atmos 'communication', though I haven't looked into that particularly in depth.



Well, I mean, what do you want to do? Do you want to just play around or do you want to make money off of it?

Certainly Nuendo can be an option if the savings are worth it. The other 9x money could go to acoustic treatment or the playback system.

On the other hand if you intend to move your mixes onto a mix stage you need to be compatible with whatever stage that's going to be. In addition if you need to rely on subcontractors to do some of the work, for example dialog editing, then you might be better off using what they use.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Guru
 

I think your best bet is to pose the question to the people in the Post Production section in the forum. There are guys there that mix in Atmos regularly and have a lot more experience with this.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #14
Lives for gear
 

Sorry for the misguided answer, thought you were exploring high channel count physical analog - conversion I/O, not just moving digital around. Why not talk to the people who would be doing the Dolby cert directly for clarification of passable options as they will have the final word regardless? A quick scan of the online pdf of Dolby Atmos home entertainment cert requirements just stated 128 channels of DAW output only which could be achieved with RME Madi. Looked like actual physical analog - conversion I/O was not stated and I guess would then be centered around the particular speaker setup option you choose. As for any Dante option, for studio usage you would need their propriatary PCIe card for workable latencies if doing any tracking / overdubing as using a computer's ethernet or even standard ethernet cards results in higher unacceptable latency.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrc View Post
Dolby has 2 types of accreditation, Theater and Home Entertainment.
I was thinking of building a mixing room that meets the Home Entertainment requirements because i don't have the budget to build the huge room needed for Theatrical accreditation.
With the Home Entertainment licence i won't be able to work on motion pictures for cinema, only for streaming services, mobile devices, vr, blue ray etc.

The system needs 2 workstations, one for the DAW, and one that runs the Dolby Atmos Renderer software.
The 128 i/o s are needed to send audio from the DAW to the Atmos Renderer and back. Also, an Atmos capable DAW is needed and currently only Pro Tools and Nuendo have this option.

This is not as unique as it seems, all facilities with Dolby Atmos accreditation must meet the 128 i/o requirements.
Right. I don't mind admitting it's not really my field. I don't really know what the market would support, what the rates are etc.

I do know to do post properly, a 20k pro tools rig isn't the most expensive thing you'll be buying.

Yep - there's a markup I suppose. That's what happens in the pro world where there's only a few options! You're looking at building a pro facility, presumably charging pro rates..so you pay pro rates for what YOU need.

I'm not saying I agree with it. But you have the choice - Nuendo for cheaper, or PT for what you know.

I would think carefully about if the investment is worth the return - for the number of Atmos gigs you're going to get, is it worth building or hiring?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
Liquidaudio's Avatar
 

Why even bother with new digital converters when the old 192 converters are fine. It's digital technology, that means it's all going to be worth 1/10th of the price in 10 years. My Pro Tools rig was around 1000 euros, but that's 32 channels.

And that's like a 3 percent sonic difference that no single soul cares about.. come on man. This sh*t is like Iphones.

Invest in analog, if you can discrete gear.

I think older converters are better anyway, but that's me.. BLASPHEMY
Old 2 weeks ago
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquidaudio View Post
Why even bother with new digital converters when the old 192 converters are fine. It's digital technology, that means it's all going to be worth 1/10th of the price in 10 years. My Pro Tools rig was around 1000 euros, but that's 32 channels.

And that's like a 3 percent sonic difference that no single soul cares about.. come on man. This sh*t is like Iphones.

Invest in analog, if you can discrete gear.

I think older converters are better anyway, but that's me.. BLASPHEMY
I think you're misunderstanding. It's not the converters that are the issue, it's the sheer io count- which you need 2 x HDX cards to achieve in PT.

And ideally you go digital in and out - which is easiest at that track count with MADI.

to do 128 io with 192s you'd need 8, and enough AES IO on the receiving machine!
Old 1 week ago
  #18
Lives for gear
i m not after better conversion, like somebody else said, the best way to do what i need would be trough a digital pipeline.
it's true that in general digital equipment tends to depreciate faster, but it also depends on the design. For example, the Prism ADA-8x is 15 yo and still holds its value.
And if you would compare the 192 converters with the DAD AX32 there's going to be a lot more than 3% difference. Those AX32s are simply stunning and in a separate league.
But at the end of the day it all depends on what you need them for.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquidaudio View Post
Why even bother with new digital converters when the old 192 converters are fine. It's digital technology, that means it's all going to be worth 1/10th of the price in 10 years. My Pro Tools rig was around 1000 euros, but that's 32 channels.

And that's like a 3 percent sonic difference that no single soul cares about.. come on man. This sh*t is like Iphones.

Invest in analog, if you can discrete gear.

I think older converters are better anyway, but that's me.. BLASPHEMY
Old 1 week ago
  #19
Lives for gear
 

Am i missing something? I thought one of the last PT updates allowed for 128 i/o for Dolby Bridge even without HDX...is that either wrong or not applicable here?
Old 1 week ago
  #20
Lives for gear
Come on guys - face reality.

1. Theatre releases are coming to an end. The only movie places that are open are drive-ins and there ain't gonna be any Atmos in a car any time soon!

2. Atmos isn't the only game in town and the alternatives are either free or much cheaper and all Blu-Ray players will take the alternatives.

3. 7.1 plus 4 is OK for the home market and nobody at the budget end of the market will care if your room is 'accredited' by X, Y, or Z.

4. Just how many punters out there do you know with a proper 3D sound system? I only know one other person apart from myself with a 7.1 home cinema and a big screen projector - and he's thousands of miles away! All the rest are watching everything on their pokey little 50"-to-65" LED TV sets and put up with the pish-poor sound that comes with them!

5. Once this C19 crisis is over, budgets will have to come down to Planet Earth. I was talking to (Oscar-winning Hollywood Royalty) and he said that they are looking at making 7- and 8-figure movies for the home viewing market for the foreseeable future.

6. Everywhere I look, film sets and shoots are shut down. I should be in the middle of making a movie right now and I ain't. We is shut down and the movie is probably lost forever. End of story!

7. As the man said, if you ain't got the candle for a $20k rig, you won't have the candle for the rest that goes with it. A set of monitors will cost more and you'll need a REALLY BIG room if you are to avoid hot-spots.

8. Now is not the time to second-guess the market. Nobody knows anything! Now is the time to keep your powder dry and watch and wait.

9. Most importantly, now is NOT the time to go anywhere near debt. Debt = risk! Not only should you avoid your own debt, but you MUST avoid dealing with others that are themselves in too much debt. The very last company I would be buying a long-term license from is one that is in negative equity!

10. The next few months will see major companies fail a six-pack at a time! And they will take many small companies with them. That means buying opportunities!
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