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who on earth is actually pre-ordering albums in 2019?
Old 24th September 2019
  #1
who on earth is actually pre-ordering albums in 2019?

This baffles me - every artist, big and small, announces pre-orders for albums - who is actually pre-ordering these things? is anyone out there actually pre-buying digital downloads? It baffles me. What's the point?
Old 24th September 2019
  #2
Lives for gear
 
cavern's Avatar
 

Yeah, unless the artists are saying they will only put out 1000 copies, get yours before we sell out, it makes no sense.
Old 26th September 2019
  #3
I believe a large part of it is generating a big landing day sales bump, which supposedly gets media attention, but there are apparently other reasons. The first of these links is actually from the game developer community, but much of it -- and the media response patterns -- are probably similar...

https://www.scalefast.com/blog/why-p...rder-pipeline/

The second link is from TuneCore. (Not an endorsement. And the article, such as it is, is all about marketing themselves; that said, like TC, I believe most of the other major aggregators are promoting their own preorder features.)

https://www.tunecore.com/guides/7-fa...out-pre-orders

Just for balance, here's Distrokid's very brief write-up on their own features (presale option via them are only available on iTunes, Amazon, and Google Play currently):

https://distrokid.zendesk.com/hc/en-...-Release-Date-
Old 26th September 2019
  #4
Gear Head
Only reason for me is to show support to the artist. Yes, I could go to the store and pick it up the first day but I think it looks better for the artist if there's also a lot of presale. Often you get something extra as a pre-orderer like pamphlets and what-not.
Old 26th September 2019
  #5
Gear Head
 

I've pre-ordered albums through Bandcamp. As others have noted, part of the reason is to show support for the artist. Also, it's easier for me to pre-order an album I know I'll want rather than remember to go back and buy it at some future date.
Old 27th September 2019
  #6
Lives for gear
 

I still buy CDs for the most part and typically preorder if I can. I do occasionally purchase albums through iTunes as well, and most cases when you preorder you get any tracks that come out before the album itself does when you preorder.
Old 28th September 2019
  #7
If it's one of my favorite bands, I sometimes will pre-order on Amazon.
Old 28th September 2019
  #8
Lives for gear
Teenagers and children.

There is a reason that pop music is so youth culture obsessed. They are the easiest to market to.

That is why 17 year olds with faces that look like a scribbled on school binder seem to define the culture these days.
To an extent it has always been that way, but like anything else that is driven by market forces it keeps trending toward the extreme. Younger and more irreverent perpetually equals better and more exciting to the point of absurdity.

Anyway, that is slightly off topic. My point is that very young people are targeted by these marketing campaigns because they are not the savviest consumers. They are relatively easy to get hyped up over something and they are more likely to make poor desicions like paying money in advance for something that is not in any way limited in quantities and which is of unknown quality and usefulness to them.

I remember when I was very young (well before streaming, and just before widespread use of the internet for music discovery) I would see an ad in a metal magazine for a new album and I would get all excited and buy it as soon as I could before listening to a single song. Most of the time those albums had maybe one or two good songs. A lot of wasted money on things that had I known better I wouldn't have bought.
But eventually I learned my lesson. And would you believe that by the time I was old enough to not make those foolish decisions I was no longer part of the demographic that the record labels primarily cater to? Strange coincidence.

The funny part (and the reason I assume the OP made this thread) is that nowadays you have so many resources in order to preview things before you buy but yet people are still willing to part with their hard earned money sound unheard. Well, technology has advanced but psychology remains the same.
Old 1st October 2019
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Local Man View Post
Teenagers and children.

There is a reason that pop music is so youth culture obsessed. They are the easiest to market to.

That is why 17 year olds with faces that look like a scribbled on school binder seem to define the culture these days.
To an extent it has always been that way, but like anything else that is driven by market forces it keeps trending toward the extreme. Younger and more irreverent perpetually equals better and more exciting to the point of absurdity.

Anyway, that is slightly off topic. My point is that very young people are targeted by these marketing campaigns because they are not the savviest consumers. They are relatively easy to get hyped up over something and they are more likely to make poor desicions like paying money in advance for something that is not in any way limited in quantities and which is of unknown quality and usefulness to them.

I remember when I was very young (well before streaming, and just before widespread use of the internet for music discovery) I would see an ad in a metal magazine for a new album and I would get all excited and buy it as soon as I could before listening to a single song. Most of the time those albums had maybe one or two good songs. A lot of wasted money on things that had I known better I wouldn't have bought.
But eventually I learned my lesson. And would you believe that by the time I was old enough to not make those foolish decisions I was no longer part of the demographic that the record labels primarily cater to? Strange coincidence.

The funny part (and the reason I assume the OP made this thread) is that nowadays you have so many resources in order to preview things before you buy but yet people are still willing to part with their hard earned money sound unheard. Well, technology has advanced but psychology remains the same.
I don’t know where you live, but I’d say that anyone who’s currently a teenager and “bought” an album here is in a very small minority! Why would they? It’s free to stream!
Old 1st October 2019
  #10
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
I don’t know where you live, but I’d say that anyone who’s currently a teenager and “bought” an album here is in a very small minority! Why would they? It’s free to stream!
You may be right.
I'm from the US (LA to be exact).

But I do feel that younger kids (early to mid teens) are sometimes very eager to support their favorite artists and are susceptible to marketing campaigns that would lead them to believe that buying everything with their favorite artists name on it would help them cement their fandom (and hell its not their money half the time anyway at that point in their lives).

But your right, albums are kind of an old fashioned thing nowadays. It's all music history in your pocket or nothing.
But somebody's gotta be buying them, right?

And I think many older people (by which I just mean late 20's and up) would be very surprised by the generosity of this next generation.
Just go on Twitch for a few minutes and see the flood of donations rolling in for someone playing video games. Those contributions are not coming from older people typically, they are coming from the streamer's peers (which tend to be pretty young).
Young people today are eager to support the things they enjoy financially.
If everybody in that age group is indeed free loading on the free streaming services then I think the music industry has done a very poor job of recognizing what is motivating that kind of support and tapping into it.
Old 1st October 2019
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Local Man View Post
You may be right.
I'm from the US (LA to be exact).

But I do feel that younger kids (early to mid teens) are sometimes very eager to support their favorite artists and are susceptible to marketing campaigns that would lead them to believe that buying everything with their favorite artists name on it would help them cement their fandom (and hell its not their money half the time anyway at that point in their lives).
Yes, the merch aspect is definitely there. I just don't think they're buying the physical albums - or even downloads.

Quote:
But your right, albums are kind of an old fashioned thing nowadays. It's all music history in your pocket or nothing.
But somebody's gotta be buying them, right?
Not really. Maybe the older generation? few people even make physical singles these days - even for a major label. Sometimes limited edition....and indie bands might make physicals of their EPs for gig sale, but that's about it.

Quote:
And I think many older people (by which I just mean late 20's and up) would be very surprised by the generosity of this next generation.
Just go on Twitch for a few minutes and see the flood of donations rolling in for someone playing video games. Those contributions are not coming from older people typically, they are coming from the streamer's peers (which tend to be pretty young).
So all we need to do is teach them how to pay for music...!

Quote:
Young people today are eager to support the things they enjoy financially.
If everybody in that age group is indeed free loading on the free streaming services then I think the music industry has done a very poor job of recognizing what is motivating that kind of support and tapping into it.
Personally I have a "family" spotify account hence no ads. My boy (when he's old enough to choose things himself) won't actually NEED to pay for music - any more than we grew up "paying" for free to air TV. So why is he going to give up his pocket money for something he gets anyway?

It's not freeloading - it's just the whole idea of "selling" a copy of a song isn't there. The industry is trying to find ways to properly monetise this, but anyone clinging to the idea of selling physical product outside of maybe a gig situation is in the process of missing the boat.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #12
I occasionally pre-order stuff...If I'm gonna get it anyway, I might as well.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
[...]
Personally I have a "family" spotify account hence no ads. My boy (when he's old enough to choose things himself) won't actually NEED to pay for music - any more than we grew up "paying" for free to air TV. So why is he going to give up his pocket money for something he gets anyway?

It's not freeloading - it's just the whole idea of "selling" a copy of a song isn't there. The industry is trying to find ways to properly monetise this, but anyone clinging to the idea of selling physical product outside of maybe a gig situation is in the process of missing the boat.
I'm almost 70. And I feel the same way as psycho_monkey -- though I certainly understand that not everyone in my age cohort would.

But most of the folks who are still committed to having -- and maintaining -- physical music collections (an interesting, even provocative locution, eh? Physical music... ) probably already HAVE most of what they want in their core collection, I would imagine, and probably aren't likely to be buying all that much more product. And that means they are NOT likely to have much of a noticeable effect on the music market going forward.*

(For instance, I have 1200 LPs, a couple hundred singles and 78s, and maybe 500 CDs.)

But I was also an early convert to the 'celestial jukebox' of subscription streaming.

In fact, I'm currently in the process of 'moving' my listening from Google's Play Music service to Amazon's Music HD service (a mostly-lossless on-demand tier), which has me pondering many of the issues all over again. (Mostly, though, pondering how 'smart' app designers and coders can, nonetheless, build less-than-ideal UI features into their work -- almost as though they'd never used a computer music player before; that said, it is SO very much better than Tidal's dorky, limited UI!)

For those not morally outraged by the notion of subscription streaming -- a development which has meant a big reversal in declining industry revenue over the last few years -- the consumer move to streaming is probably a 'no brainer.'


* And not only do subscribers like me ADD to artist/industry revenue with every play -- those plays 'count' (to some incremental amount) culturally toward the industry perception of the importance of the music I and other similar subscribers listen to.
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