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Advise on Audio Education
Old 15th January 2007
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Question Advise on Audio Education

Hey..Im an electronics and communication engineer (and an audio enthusiast) based in Chennai, India. I also did a diploma program in audio engineering from SAE, Chennai.Since graduating, ive been working at various music production facilities across Chennai.I am very keen on continuing my studies in audio technology and was initially planning on doing the B.A in Recording Arts program at SAE, Byron Bay, Australia. But, I've since, changed my mind on doing that program considering how notorious SAE is in the industry.I now plan on doing a university program and have shortlisted a few universities in the U.S (Listed Below).

I would really appreciate it if you guys could share your thoughts about these Universities/Programs and let me know which you think i should be applying for.. Is there anyone here whos done any of these programs? Do you know anyone whos done any of these programs? Are there any other Universities/Programs that i might have missed out? I have also included a few Masters programs.However my doubts about doing a Masters are with regard to these two points..

1. Does the audio industry really require students with a Master's
Degree? Since, Master's degree programs in the area are a relatively
new option, Wouldn't they be looking for some type of education in
general, but not specifically a Master's Degree?

2.Wouldn't most of the industry prefer a bachelor's degree with a
variety of coursework and then an internship or other type of previous
work experience? In that case, Wouldn't a bachelor's program be better
in terms of a broader education and scope?

The Universities/Programs ive shortlisted:
------------------------------------------

1.University of Massachusetts Lowell - Bachelors in Sound Recording Technology (SRT) /Master of Music in Sound Recording Technology.

2.New York University - Master’s in Music Technology program

3.Middle Tennessee State University - BS in Recording Industry/MFA in Recording Arts and Technologies

4.University of Miami - BS in Music Engineering Technology

5.McGill University (Schulich School of Music) - M.Mus in Sound Recording

6.University of Hartford (Hartt School) - BMusic in Music Production and Technology

7.CalArts - BFA in the Music Technology

8.Berklee College of Music - Bachelors in Music Production and Engineering

9.Johns Hopkins University (The Peabody Institute) - BM in Recording Arts and Sciences/MA in Audio Sciences

10. SAE - BA in Recording Arts

Phew! Thats a long post heh ..Thanks a lot for your patience..looking forward to hearing from you.
Old 15th January 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Jose Mrochek's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by go4sandee View Post

1. Does the audio industry really require students with a Master's
Degree? u.
No! the audio industry doesn't require a degree at all! It's about who you know, and who is willing to give you a chance. The first question I think you should ask yourself is where do you want to take your engineering career to ? Do you want to be an amazing home recordist, or do you want to mix records at the Record Plant, Hit Factory etc..

If you want to open up your own home studio.. by all means, don't waste money in recording school. But if you want to go mainstream.. well, school's like Fullsail do the job pretty easy for you. I had my internship set thanks to my fullsail degree after 20 days of graduation, at a big mainstream facility.

Alot of people have different stories on how they "made it" into mainstream. Non that I can recall was thanks to a mastering degree. If I were to do it again, I would either go to fullsail or somewhere in LA or NY. And network with different people (make friends) from the start.
Old 16th January 2007
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
No! the audio industry doesn't require a degree at all! It's about who you know, and who is willing to give you a chance. The first question I think you should ask yourself is where do you want to take your engineering career to ? Do you want to be an amazing home recordist, or do you want to mix records at the Record Plant, Hit Factory etc..

If you want to open up your own home studio.. by all means, don't waste money in recording school. But if you want to go mainstream.. well, school's like Fullsail do the job pretty easy for you. I had my internship set thanks to my fullsail degree after 20 days of graduation, at a big mainstream facility.

Alot of people have different stories on how they "made it" into mainstream. Non that I can recall was thanks to a mastering degree. If I were to do it again, I would either go to fullsail or somewhere in LA or NY. And network with different people (make friends) from the start.
Well said ! From what I have seen , it is the hard working guys who gain experience over time that get the real gigs. All those engineers that get their degrees lack style and individuality. Plus they couldn't roll a spliff if they tried.
Old 25th January 2007
  #4
Gear Addict
 
lefthando's Avatar
 

Save all the money you would othewise use for school and put it in a bank account. You're going to need it to live on as you will likely be earning very little money as an AE for the first few years.


Quote:
Originally Posted by go4sandee View Post
Hey..Im an electronics and communication engineer (and an audio enthusiast) based in Chennai, India. I also did a diploma program in audio engineering from SAE, Chennai.Since graduating, ive been working at various music production facilities across Chennai.I am very keen on continuing my studies in audio technology and was initially planning on doing the B.A in Recording Arts program at SAE, Byron Bay, Australia. But, I've since, changed my mind on doing that program considering how notorious SAE is in the industry.I now plan on doing a university program and have shortlisted a few universities in the U.S (Listed Below).

I would really appreciate it if you guys could share your thoughts about these Universities/Programs and let me know which you think i should be applying for.. Is there anyone here whos done any of these programs? Do you know anyone whos done any of these programs? Are there any other Universities/Programs that i might have missed out? I have also included a few Masters programs.However my doubts about doing a Masters are with regard to these two points..

1. Does the audio industry really require students with a Master's
Degree? Since, Master's degree programs in the area are a relatively
new option, Wouldn't they be looking for some type of education in
general, but not specifically a Master's Degree?

2.Wouldn't most of the industry prefer a bachelor's degree with a
variety of coursework and then an internship or other type of previous
work experience? In that case, Wouldn't a bachelor's program be better
in terms of a broader education and scope?

The Universities/Programs ive shortlisted:
------------------------------------------

1.University of Massachusetts Lowell - Bachelors in Sound Recording Technology (SRT) /Master of Music in Sound Recording Technology.

2.New York University - Master’s in Music Technology program

3.Middle Tennessee State University - BS in Recording Industry/MFA in Recording Arts and Technologies

4.University of Miami - BS in Music Engineering Technology

5.McGill University (Schulich School of Music) - M.Mus in Sound Recording

6.University of Hartford (Hartt School) - BMusic in Music Production and Technology

7.CalArts - BFA in the Music Technology

8.Berklee College of Music - Bachelors in Music Production and Engineering

9.Johns Hopkins University (The Peabody Institute) - BM in Recording Arts and Sciences/MA in Audio Sciences

10. SAE - BA in Recording Arts

Phew! Thats a long post heh ..Thanks a lot for your patience..looking forward to hearing from you.
Old 25th January 2007
  #5
I'll tell you this about Berklee

The MP&E program you don't start in until your second year and you better be ready to PLAY an instrument...

In fact, they take a select few (based on grades...not talent or ears just grades) for the MP&E and at around 40k (overall including room n board and living) a year...you've wasted 40k if youd on't get in...

Quit ya day job...

and in a few years...we'll swoop in and encourage you to continue...

or we'll say stop...and then seriously you must stop.

Seriously, I'm a Berklee alum and I learned more doing recording on the side for people for beer/food/cash than I ever did in the classroom there...experience is king...paper is for wiping your a$$.
Old 26th January 2007
  #6
Here for the gear
 

I'm in the MFA program at Middle Tennessee State. I agree that a degree is not required to get a job in the industry, but I chose this degree based off of these reasons:
1. Options are a good thing. An MFA will allow me to teach at the university level, credentials for some private sector work(churches, organizations, etc.) and has helped me to break into a network of people that I might not have otherwise.
2. Compared to most undergraduate degrees you have way more access to studios and earlier on in your coursework. The studios at MTSU are nice.
3. I tend to , as assume most people do, find one part of audio or video production that I like and just stick with that. Being at a university you are exposed to specialty areas of knowledge that I might have skipped over in publications.

These are a few of my reasons. Then again...it's 3 years of your life so it's good to know this is the right option for you before starting.

*** Also the tuition is relatively cheap at MTSU.
Old 26th January 2007
  #7
Gear Head
 

I wouldn't say an education is a waist of money. But you won't learn how to mix or record properly either.

The only way to learn is by doing it a lot. Make a lot of mistakes. Talk to other engineers who are more experienced.

I never had an education in audio but am earning my living of it in Holland. Let me teel you here there are more AE then gigs or jobs. But i've been doing this for a long time now and the only thing i know to be true is real experience. Talent doesn't hurt either. Working hard and willing to work hard is also a neccesaty. Best of all is to have communication skills. You need to know the mind of musicians in order to get what you want. Knowing how to play music is also good.

This is not an easy job and not the most satisfying job either.

I would save indeed the money for hard times instead of going for another degree. The degree won't help you much. The experience you can suck up does the job much better.

Misja
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