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Green Glue alternatives
Old 30th December 2014
  #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod Gervais View Post
This is nothing like Green Glue...... it is simply caulk.

When shear is referred to when examining Green Glue that is in relation to it's ability (because it remains in a liquid state and does not "cure") to shear while releasing energy in the form of heat.

When this company is referring to shear in their literature it is in relation to their products ability to resist shear forces due to movement in a building's structure; this due to building movement under wind/seismic loads or differing expansion coefficients between various building materials used in construction.

Tremco makes excellent sealants....... I specify their products quite a bit on my projects....... but none of those products are Green Glue substitutes...

Rod
Thanks Rod. The Tremco sealant/caulk I have actually never sets up. We used it on some seams of a first layer of drywall about 5 months ago and it is still very pliable. It doesn't appear to cure, like green glue doesn't. Last night I stuck two smaller pieces of drywall together using the stuff, went into my building this morning and found it to be behaving much like the Green Glue in the video that Markertek did at the 3:20 mark. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiUBxjFG53o#t=238


I am actually working on a little test with several different products today just like the guy in the Markertek video did using the tiles. I'll try to do a video of it once everything is ready. My goal is to not dismiss, or devalue Green Glue or anything like that. I just want to see for myself if it is necessary for me to spend $3K on Green Glue, or If I can find an alternative that is cheaper, even if it doesn't work quite as well? For me it is a matter of dollars spent versus the amount of damping since I am funding my entire build completely out of pocket.

I love your book and have a copy of it in front of me every time I sit at my desk! I really appreciate how active you are on the forums here and that you base your conclusions off of facts attained from testing, and experience.
Old 30th December 2014
  #62
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If caulk never reached a set point then my guess would be that there is something wrong with it..... perhaps it froze - or perhaps it was simply a bad batch of caulk.....

Some caulks stay very "pliable" over time - but there is a difference between setting up to a point that would be described as "pliable" and remaining in a liquid state. I've worked with some caulks that were extremely pliable - that (after fully setting) you could easily push a pencil through from one side to the other because they remained very soft....... however that does not mean they remained a liquid...... they set - Green Glue (though) does not "set"..... and if it did it would not work in the manner it does.

Now - I will have to mention that the test I viewed above (although representative of an advantage GG does possess) is not really a good representation of it's true value...... or at least not to anyone who is going to use it to build. And I say this because no one building in the real world is going to build a wall where the drywall is not going to be physically attached to the framing behind it via screws penetrating the face of drywall into the studs behind. And it is there where this type of experiment loses some validity.

I wonder how that same test would have fared had those 2 hard material faces been coupled with mechanical fasteners? My guess is that ringing (in that case) would have remained very close to the same - this because when you simply press 2 surfaces against a bed of GG you do not necessarily directly mate the 2 surfaces - i.e.: they don't have to physically touch one another - whereas when you physically screw them together to join them (with drywall this would be in accordance with building code requirements) the back of those surfaces make a hard contact with one another.

As I said - interesting - but not necessarily anything beyond that.

I doubt if you can come up with any home test that will really represent any gain you might recognize without building some seriously large models to play with....... this because without a lab to test in it really becomes very difficult to determine any difference between (relatively) small samples.......

When I refer to "large samples" that would probably be (at a minimum) at least an entire wall surface of a room.

Best of luck, and thanks for the kind words on the book,

Rod
Old 2nd January 2015
  #63
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Kal Sereousz's Avatar
 

Questions about green glue.
Can I use it to seal windows in a vocal booth built with a Timber Frame?
If I needed to take the booth apart (if I moved and had to spilt it into sections for transport) would it be easy enough to do this?
The carpenter helping me has suggested using silicone to seal the window and the walls.
Is Green Glue a viable alternative?
Old 2nd January 2015
  #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Sereousz View Post
Questions about green glue.
Can I use it to seal windows in a vocal booth built with a Timber Frame?
If I needed to take the booth apart (if I moved and had to spilt it into sections for transport) would it be easy enough to do this?
The carpenter helping me has suggested using silicone to seal the window and the walls.
Is Green Glue a viable alternative?
Kal - just as no caulk is Green Glue - Green Glue is not caulk - and it would not work well in that regard at all........

Green Glue remains wet - never really "sets up" - as such it would simply sag over time and make a mess.......

Now - the Green Glue Company does make an acoustic sealant (it is not "Green Glue")........ but I have never really found any of the acoustic caulks to be worth the added expense.

Big Stretch caulk is a great product - but like any great caulking products - it bonds very well to the various parts and pieces it comes into contact with - and it does not make like easy when you want to take things apart - but then again - any caulk that would make things easy in that regard would be pretty much useless as a caulk.......

Best of luck,

Rod
Old 2nd January 2015
  #65
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I did use the Greengluecompany Noiseproofing sealant (I ordered it together with my batch of Greenglue).
At that time I was not going to pay more for a specialised acoustic sealant.
But then I noticed, the price was about the same as a standard good quality sealant in Belgium.

I was really quite happy using the product: it is applied WAY more quickly (big tubes as opposed to our Belgian mini sizes), comes out of the tube really easy, and it fills bigger seams flawlessly. I probably saved a few hours of caulking by using this product.

And it is very probable that it will remain sealed for the next decade - opposed to standard building products.
Old 2nd January 2015
  #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yannick View Post
I did use the Greengluecompany Noiseproofing sealant (I ordered it together with my batch of Greenglue).
At that time I was not going to pay more for a specialised acoustic sealant.
But then I noticed, the price was about the same as a standard good quality sealant in Belgium.

I was really quite happy using the product: it is applied WAY more quickly (big tubes as opposed to our Belgian mini sizes), comes out of the tube really easy, and it fills bigger seams flawlessly. I probably saved a few hours of caulking by using this product.

And it is very probable that it will remain sealed for the next decade - opposed to standard building products.
It would not surprise me either...... but (then again) it would not surprise me if pretty much any of the exterior grade caulks/sealants would last 10 years of more inside of a building.......

They aren't exposed to the weather - never go through freeze/thaw cycles none of the things they are designed to be exposed to in normal usage......

Ge Silicone II (for example) has a limited lifetime warranty used as an outside sealant..........

Big Stretch (one of my favorite caulks because of the excellent adhesion capability it possesses, and it's resistance to structural movement (they call it Big Stretch for a reason) has a very limited lifetime warranty but I would recommend it in a New York second for use inside or out.......

There are a lot of ways to skin this particular cat - and if you can get acoustic caulks for the same price as any other good quality caulk - then it makes perfect sense........

It just doesn't make sense to me to pay a premium for it over other premium products that will do exactly the same job when all is said and done......

Rod
Old 2nd January 2015
  #67
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Jedanor's Avatar
 

So how would you compare the performance of similar wall assemblies tested as per ASTM E90 using 25 gauge RC-1 (or the equivalent) to the performance of GG? I can see where the damping would improve the inherent low (and higher) frequency resonance problems associated with GWB, but in a strict TL comparison, where are you actually needing (desiring) the extra TL and how do they compare?

Jed
Old 2nd January 2015
  #68
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Rod Gervais's Avatar
 

Jedanor,

You compare them by examining data from lab tests with all other things equal - the only difference being the use of GG or not.........

IR-761 has plenty of wall assemblies with resilient channel (RC-1) - pick an assembly with an equivalent mass on each face to compare with the tests at GG...

You should be able to find manufacturers test data for other resilient assemblies (RSIC systems) and again compare with equal mass to the GG test results.........

GG used to have all those tests/comparisons on their website to examine - I do not know if that is the case any more.

Rod
Old 2nd January 2015
  #69
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IR-761 doesn't have exact matched test reports for perfect "apples to apples" comparisons of tests but I've compared 1/2" GWB unbalanced assemblies to the same GG assemblies using 5/8" GWB and I'm only seeing the TL improvement exhibited at the higher frequencies. The general coincidence dip you see with regular GWB assemblies is not inherent with the GG (nor is it with the higher end QuietRock), which is a plus, but at many frequencies a simple RC-1 outperforms the tested GG assembly. Of course, much of this is semantics because screw patterns, stud spacing, etc. all matter in the outcome of any given E90 test and you will not find in any literature (to my knowledge) an exact comparison between the Orfield Lab GG assembly tests and the NRCC assemblies (or any other lab assemblies). If you find them, I'd love to put them in my archives which I've been building for years.

With that said, assuming similar partitions with similar stud spacing and gauge, I'm seeing RC-1 outperforming GG in the middle frequencies and GG outperforming RC-1 at the high frequencies. That is why I asked where most are wanting to use GG for attenuation. Is it only these high frequencies or is it the combination of having the damping (which probably alters (improves) the absorption for GWB at low frequencies and the loss of the "dip")? RC-1, although it is seldom installed correctly, does work and I've installed it myself and it's very inexpensive.

I didn't bother to compare all the Orfield tests with the NRCC tests. I looked at the unbalanced assembly and balanced assembly using 3-5/8" studs (90mm) and a wood 2x4 stud test (so I compared three basic assemblies). For the wood assembly, I could have been more fair to the RC-1 (if a similar test existed), as it was only installed on one side of the partition and the GG was installed on both sides of a balanced assembly comprising four layers of GWB.

I've always been a proponent of double stud assemblies myself. YMMV. I've been slammed in work so I'll have to take another look at the tests I did compare, but unless I'm missing something, the RC-1 did pretty damn good considering.

Jed
Old 3rd January 2015
  #70
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RC -1 gives roughly a 5-6dB (weighted) advantage over standard wall construction - you get about another 5-6dB moving to clips and hat section and then another 5-6dB with isolated frames..........

All of this (of course) assumes lab perfect construction - flanking paths and construction errors drop things pretty quickly.

I've seen isolation between spaces with over 30dB less isolation than the exact same assemblies in lab tests due to field errors during construction. And (of course) one of the huge challenges with getting any resilient system to work correctly is that none of the surfaces can actually make contact with any other surface...... so the corner details become a critical part of the whole....

I don't use GG in my designs on a regular basis - only when I need to push things a little more - so when getting to where I want to be is less expensive using GG than what it would be using additional mass.....

But that is just me.........

Rod
Old 3rd January 2015
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod Gervais View Post

All of this (of course) assumes lab perfect construction - flanking paths and construction errors drop things pretty quickly.

Rod
I totally agree with you Rod, but that goes with any partition that isn't properly constructed. I run into window mullion problems (and many other type installation problems) constantly during the testing and inspection process. It takes very little for a contractor to screw up the installation of a rated assembly. I've run into flanking problems at corridors where high end demising walls achieved very poor TL because the contractor didn't install box joints at common corridors. I've passed my business card between rooms at partition intersections with columns. In this business, you see a little of everything.

I am not trying to debate whether GG is worth the added cost and am certainly not here to put down the process of damping or the product itself. Damping techniques have been used for years successfully in various ways. It can be a godsend on assembly lines where boxes are ramping down (pounding) light gage metal chutes and making them ring.

I've watched these GG discussions here for a long time and, as I recall, most discussions regarded TL performance. So, what I am interested in is if there are any other advantages that GG provides since there are assemblies of similar construction that, when properly constructed, are as good, or better, than GG at certain frequencies. If I am going to recommend GG to an architect, it would be good to know what other advantage(s) GG brings to the table beyond what the lab tests might show. Is it more dummy proof for a contractor? Are the absorption coefficients of GG "fused" boards more uniform than standard GWB (I've never seen this stated but I'm sure they must be different)?

I was only using RC-1 as an example. Like you, I recommend products / designs on a case-by-case basis. For the record, I avoid recommending RC-1 even though it is still in wide use by architects.

Any comments are welcome here.

Thanks,

Jed
Old 3rd January 2015
  #72
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Jed,

What's your starting point and your end goal here?

If you are talking about constructing a single frame wall assembly between (let's say for the sake of conversation) a high end apartments and are thinking along the lines of using Green Glue with the drywall directly attached to the framing vrs some sort of resilient system - then I would opt for the decoupling offered by RC over a coupled wall using GG (all other things of course being equal)

I will always choose a means by which I can decouple the wall faces first - and then look at added mass vrs GG if I want more boost - but never an either/or when it comes to single frame wall assemblies...

Rod
Old 16th January 2015
  #73
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I bought a case of Green Glue and did one room with the stuff. I compared it with 4 other types of materials that I have heard people suggest on this site and others. Since I am not a scientist and I don't have a lab with perfect matching walls and a tightly controlled test metric, I cannot say how each performs from a sound standpoint. But I will say that from an application standpoint, Green Glue was hands down the easiest to apply to the sheets...and not by a little bit either. By a long ways. Really, really easy to apply with the tubes.

I am still working on a test using ceramic tiles, and some small sheets of 5/8ths sheetrock just for my own education and piece of mind. I am planning to video the results and will post the video here when I am done.

Thanks Rod for all of your expertise on this subject and others.
Old 9th June 2015
  #74
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Friedemann's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motoxxx View Post

I am still working on a test using ceramic tiles, and some small sheets of 5/8ths sheetrock just for my own education and piece of mind. I am planning to video the results and will post the video here when I am done.
Ever happened? Would really like to see it!

Thanks!
Old 15th September 2015
  #75
Gear Nut
I'm finding myself again in a similar position some others. I've done enough reading on GG to know it's good stuff but the Australian prices seem to negate the cost/effectiveness ratio that is claimed.
e.g 13mm gyprock (drywall) = $15 per sheet to me.
At the suggested 2 tubes of GG per sheet at Aussie prices = $72 per sheet. The equivalent of 4.8 extra 13mm sheets of mass per sheet.
I should note the plan was to do the drywall-GG-drywall sandwich on inner frame of a double stud setup. The labour for putting up the drywall is also 'mates rates' .
I can see this has sort of been discussed, but comparing to one extra gyprock layer.

Can anyone tell me where I can source GG at a non-ludicrous price in Aus, or give me any reason why this make any sense at the said price when almost 5 extra sheets of mass could be had for the same price?
Old 24th September 2016
  #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod Gervais View Post
nz,

If you can't source Green Glue or quiet glue - you can always simply add more mass.........

Rod
Hi Rod, which would yield better isolation/TL in your opinion? Say a layer of 3.5" Ultratouch insulation in a 24" OC wall frame, or five or so layers of 5/8" drywall {used as insulation, IE solid mass drywall construction throughout the stud width} with Green Glue between each layer? Hope that makes more sense,
Thanks for your speculation, Temple.

Last edited by Temple of Light; 25th September 2016 at 06:39 PM..
Old 7th January 2019
  #77
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I spend my last summer vacation in Australia. My uncle wanted me to sound dampen his house using locally and cheap materials. The only material that came into my mind was green glue but I couldn't source locally. I was lucky to source some materials such as Mass loaded vinyls, red glue, quiet rock and others. Here is a good resource of some of green glue alternatives you can find for cheap. 5 Green Glue Alternatives (Best For DIY Soundproofing Projects)
Old 7th January 2019
  #78
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Great Alternatives

I spend my last summer vacation in Australia. My uncle wanted me to sound dampen his house using locally and cheap materials. The only material that came into my mind was green glue but I couldn't source locally. I was lucky to source some materials such as Mass loaded vinyls, red glue, quiet rock and others. Here is a good resource of some of green glue alternatives you can find for cheap. 5 Green Glue Alternatives (Best For DIY Soundproofing Projects)
Old 16th January 2019
  #79
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norton's Avatar
Tanya. This article is wholly inaccurate and mostly very wrong.

First. GG is a damping agent. Between two sheets of (insert your favorite material here) it damps the ability of those sheets to vibrate and thereby allow sound to pass through them as efficiently as an undamped assembly. GG never fully cures so it remains flexible. This is a very simplistic and incomplete explanation. But it’s important to understand what GG does if you want to approximate its performance.

Mass loaded vinyl is an effective tool for acoustic treatments...but it is extremely expensive when compared to GG and doesn’t offer close to the performance of GG in stopping sound transmission in a wall assembly.

Using caulk or silicone as a substitute for GG is a huge mistake. Those products dry hard/solid and even in the case of pure silicone, they can actually increase an assembly’s ability to transmit sound. Glues, caulks and silicones all contribute to triple leafing in an assembly by creating air pockets in that assembled layer and are a terrible idea, in practice.

I know from first hand lab testing experience. All of these substitutes have been tested exhaustively. Seriously, just about every conceivable product and assembly was tested. If any of them worked I’d be happy to share any “secret” recipe. Unfortunately there are none.

If GG is impossible to source you’re better off using another layer of sheeting material for mass. If possible use resilient channels for a little extra flex and decoupling.
Old 27th January 2019
  #80
Interesting thread. I am looking at the possibility to move my private home/hobby studio, which is in one of the spare untreated bedrooms in my house. My thought is buying a pre-built shed shell by Old Hickery Sheds (TuffShed as my 2nd choice). I can build a shed, but do not have the time. So it's an easier choice to buy a shed and have it set on my property, and do some level of sound treatment/deadening. I do not intend to, and will not be playing acoustic drums, nor play bass guitar from a real bass amp. I used amp modelers mostly anyway for guitar & bass. I may at some point want to mic my Marshal or Boogie guitar amp cabs, not sure and not overly concerned. What I'm most concerned about is anyone on the outside from hearing my trying to record my vocals, so this is my primary target for blocking sound frequencies.

Taking up space is a concern, but I plan to build just one partition wall within a 12X24ft shed, maybe 4 ft deep to house my PC's, and will shove my guitar speakers cabs in there, and use for general storage. This is to block computer noise (and guitar cabinet maybe) from my main large working space, where I'll be stationed at any given location, whether my e-drum kit station which is 4 kits combines, my keyboard synth station, my desk, my mixer/interface/DAW controller board, my 5 1/2ft tall rack, my amp heads, guitar modeler station & other gear and a Futon.
I do not intend to do a double wall, nor offset stud construction, I do not want to take up valuable space inside. For this reason I thinking of sound-clips & resilient channel before layers of wall...2 layers of sheet rock, or possibly another material along with one layer of sheet rock. One suggestion I read, was to use regular sound board found at say Home Depot or Lowe's.

Green Glue (why I'm responding to this thread mainly) has been mentioned in just about everything I've read, from forum users to professional companies selling soundproofing products. In another GS thread I asked if there was any other product besides Green Glue, and I think I read of only ONE other product earlier in this thread. It seems Rod is the TRUE GS expert on this subject, and pretty much says there are very limited products (only 2 mentions though) that are anywhere near the equivalent of Green Glue...as hard to believe there is such a limited number of products for this purpose? Ah, so be it I suppose!
I also respect the comments made over & over to people by Rod, saying that he only will be looking at actual test data, and not guessing, and I have admittingly been thinking along those lines. But do I believe there are some products that actually CAN be substituted and have data to back up? YES, Do I believe there can be substitutes that have NO data to back it up, yet could work just as well? Yes, but that's where it's just that, taking chances on a guess! For a professional to come in and do a job for someone in the business of working in a studio for hire, that I can see where Rod finds that unacceptable. For someone like me, who doesn't needs complete soundproofing at all frequencies, but concerned about the vocal range frequencies, and is a hobby studio, I can maybe take some chances on unproven methods saving a BUTT-LOAD of money.
I have not prices out this Green Glue stuff, but apparently everyone is saying it's pretty expensive...hmmm. All I know is, whatever I do in this proposed shed (sound-clips, resilient channels on sheds raw studs, & two layers of mass with some green glue???), it's going to be considerably better than my current home studio location, being in a spare untreated bedroom. I read of one alternative to Green Glue by the way, still using 2 layers of sheet rock, use a layer of that sound board from Home Depot instead of the Green Glue, dunno if that's a good idea or not, but have to imagine it will help, rather than not.
And after all this from me, most of the time I'd be in there, I'll likely have the entire room open to the outside for fresh air, and I do most everything DIRECT...aside from vocals and occasionally miking an acoustic, instead of my usual direct in. So for the 'occasional' need for sound proofing, I can't see spending my entire retirement on this project.

Last edited by Steve Fogal; 28th January 2019 at 03:26 AM..
Old 27th January 2019
  #81
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Steve:

Do much more studying. Clips work with hat channel, not resilient channel. There is no such thing as "complete soundproofing." Soundboard in a leaf does nothing useful.

Andre
Old 27th January 2019
  #82
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norton's Avatar
So much to unpack.

I’m going to keep this simple and to the gg substitute point.

Steve. GG is cost effective. It might be $10 a tube, but so are all the “alternatives” that won’t actually work.

GG is also less expensive and time consuming than adding more mass to your assembly.

I can equivocally say that just about every conceivable substitution was run through a battery of lab tests by the creators of the gg formula. I can say this with confidence because I was there.

If it comes in a tube, or bucket and acts like glue or rubber or silicone or tar...it was tested. None of those substances gave any appreciable benefit to a non treated assembly. Some actually performed worse.

At one time, There were a couple “similar” products brought to market but none were more effective, or less $$ than gg. Again.....i was party to those tests as well.

Here’s a “secret” that might help you...just use less gg. Saint GoBain will tell you to use 2 tubes per 4x8 sheet of gyp-board. Just use 1. Or maybe even 3/4 of a tube. You won’t lose any appreciable performance.

But other than that...you will be wasting your time looking for a cheaper substitute. There simply aren’t any off the Shelf unintentional accidental secret substitutions for GG.
Old 28th January 2019
  #83
Quote:
Originally Posted by avare View Post
Steve:

Do much more studying. Clips work with hat channel, not resilient channel. There is no such thing as "complete soundproofing." Soundboard in a leaf does nothing useful.

Andre

Andre, I may be miss quoting the terminology there, hat channel then! I certainly do not require real serious, let alone complete sound proofing. By "leaf" you mean how I think I presented the order of, studs > clips > hat channel > sound board > sheet rock? (or replacing sound board with a layer of sheet rock instead, and let's assume I'd use the Green Glue).

I'm a ways away from even doing any of this shed/studio conversion, so I'll be reading more on the subject. And by the way, is not sound board useful at all? I mean it would add in another type of material there, which is soft.
Old 28th January 2019
  #84
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There’s really no practical “sound board” as far as sound isolation construction is concerned.

“Buffalo board” or compressed fiber board has no real benefit to a good performing wall or ceiling assembly.

The main thing You want from your wall/ceiling sheathing material is mass. In small room and limited budget projects There’s no practical benefit to mixing or matching materials in the sheathing sandwich.

The green glue website has an absolute encyclopedia of practical information on how to best tackle your peoject. They explain leafing extremely well.
Old 28th January 2019
  #85
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As said above, if you want to skimp on costs, use 1 bottle of GG per sheet. If you want to skimp more, there is nothing to say, just do not bother soundproofing your room, as it will never happen.

I used GG in my construction, and besides the performance, the ease of use and speed was impressive. Also their sealant was impressively quick to apply, even be an amateur such as myself
Old 28th January 2019
  #86
Quote:
Originally Posted by norton View Post
There’s really no practical “sound board” as far as sound isolation construction is concerned.

“Buffalo board” or compressed fiber board has no real benefit to a good performing wall or ceiling assembly.

The main thing You want from your wall/ceiling sheathing material is mass. In small room and limited budget projects There’s no practical benefit to mixing or matching materials in the sheathing sandwich.

The green glue website has an absolute encyclopedia of practical information on how to best tackle your peoject. They explain leafing extremely well.
Ah thanks, I wonder why they call it "sound board" then? It's recommended to install that stuff on the stud walls 1st, before the sheet rock. Not only was I assuming it had sound absorption benefits, but also assumed it could possibly help in buffering the sound transmission going into the studs, as the sheet rock would be the final surface inside the room, and sound waves hitting that 1st. An effect I just recently thought of as possibly having a similar effect to using sound-clips & hat channels before the rock.
My thought 'was' that being the sound board is soft, there would be less vibration going directly into the much harder wood of the studs from the other side. And further, had been pondering an unconventional thought of attaching sound board to the studs, but 1st attach strips of say plywood 'behind' the sound board, which would be positioned in between the studs in the stud bay cavity, and not touching any studs, nor top & bottom 2X4 plates. The sheet rock would then be attached with screws through the sound board, into the suspended plywood strips. This would hold the sheet rock ok, but thought I would need a thin furring strip between the screw heads & sound board to secure it to the studs better.


At my previous house, I had a very small music room with walls 2 ft from reaching the ceiling. I finished framing up the walls to the ceiling with 2X4's, put up sheet rock, THEN put up that sound board from Home Depot over it (not recommended). It did at least seem to deaden reflective sounds, compared to without it. But it's supposed to be installed before sheet rock.

And $10 a tube for the Green Glue, isn't THAT bad, I thought it was a lot more based on what I've read of many people saying it was so expensive. BTW, in my experience ordinary caulking is much less, I bought a couple of tubes for under $4.00 each for my exterior house wall project...not that I'd use it for sound purposes.

Last edited by Steve Fogal; 28th January 2019 at 05:52 PM..
Old 29th January 2019
  #87
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norton's Avatar
Yeah. Assumptions and relying on “conventional wisdom” As far as “sound board” goes will only leave you disappointed.

The assembly you described: buffalo board on top of Sheetrock - will not get you any significant decrease in sound transmission through that assembly. It will be a softer wall from inside the space. But not in a way that you’d want from an acoustic perspective.

The end result of that kind of assembly is more effort installing a second layer. More expense in materials and no significant increase in performance.

Do yourself a huge favor and read up on “sound proof” construction assemblies at the GG website. You’ll get it right the first time, not waste your money or effort and you won’t have to waste valuable brain space with “what if’s” and “would this work” kind of scenarios.

Just to be clear....There are 2 different GG products. Sealant (caulk) and sound proofing compound (inbetween wall board sheets). They both come in the large sized tubes. And any glue/caulk in that size will run you $10-17.

Also. You can get the noise proofing compound in pails if you want to save a little $$.
Old 28th November 2019
  #88
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Green Glue is one of the best sound dampening material. But I understand that it's only available in USA and some countries in Europe.

However if you can get Green Glue, you can try QUIET ROCK, RED GLUE.

These are the closest in terms of effectiveness and efficiency to Green Glue
Old 22nd January 2020
  #89
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Green Glue is one of the best sealant compound you can ever get. I would advise you to dig deeper and if possible import from outside your country. While there are alternatives, they won't work like green glue. I've tested and tried and I can firmly confirm my statement. If you're stilll interested in green glue alternatives check out this recommendation at soundproof nation
Old 22nd January 2020
  #90
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Green glue should be readily available in Europe. It may have a different name. The parent company is Saint GoBain and had their gg related hq in France.

Plenty of lab published papers/tests and proofs showing how real world and cost effective green glue is compared to what it would take to achieve similar results without gg.

There’s an art to data manipulation and there are unscrupulous charlatans selling garbage as gold at every turn.

Green glue works. Both sound damping compound and the caulk/sealant. Best in the business. Hands down.
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