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Properties of Reflective Materials Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 13th September 2011
  #1
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Properties of Reflective Materials

What properties make a material acoustically reflective? Density, rigidity, smoothness, nonporousness, something else?

Which materials are the most reflective and why?

What is the relationship between the properties of a material and the frequencies they best reflect?

Thanks!
Old 13th September 2011
  #2
Old 14th September 2011
  #3
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Jens, I just finished reading that entire thread, and I'm now wondering if your linking to it was an assassination attempt.

So, what I've gathered from the thread (after gathering the bits of my brain from the untreated walls, ceiling and floor) is that the way to get the most reflection is to make a reasonably hard material as immobile as possible. Yeah?
Old 14th September 2011
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicManic View Post
Jens, I just finished reading that entire thread, and I'm now wondering if your linking to it was an assassination attempt.
heh

Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicManic View Post
So, what I've gathered from the thread (after gathering the bits of my brain from the untreated walls, ceiling and floor) is that the way to get the most reflection is to make a reasonably hard material as immobile as possible. Yeah?
Yes exactly, and to make it as immobile as possible usually involves mass, the heavier the better if low frequency reflection is wanted. If low frequencies, the area needs to be big compared to wavelength if unbounded.
Old 14th September 2011
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
heh
Yes exactly, and to make it as immobile as possible usually involves mass, the heavier the better if low frequency reflection is wanted. If low frequencies, the area needs to be big compared to wavelength if unbounded.
If you want to reflect the lows, can it be done with several smaller but hard disconnected surfaces adding up or do you need the mass to be one large unbroken surface?
Is an unmortared stacked brick gobo or even several an option? That way the bricks can be put away after recording.
Old 14th September 2011
  #6
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicManic View Post
If you want to reflect the lows, can it be done with several smaller but hard disconnected surfaces adding up or do you need the mass to be one large unbroken surface?
Look intoperforated panels.
Old 14th September 2011
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
Look intoperforated panels.
I thought perforated panels were designed to allow some frequencies to pass through.

Among other things, I'm wondering how to reflect as much of the entire spectrum as possible with a portable surface. Retaining wall bricks like in the photo are one thing I was considering, since they're cheap, nest easily and can be stowed away when not in use. Maybe painted.
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