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Mixing Room Layout...Help me make it better! Dynamics Plugins
Old 11th September 2011
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Mixing Room Layout...Help me make it better!

Hello all,

I've somewhat recently moved into a new home and was graced with enough space to have a dedicated mixing room! I've had it setup for awhile but I know there are probably things I can change to make it more effective and help my mixes translate better.

I've attached a picture that is very close to scale to give you an idea of the dimensions and room treatment I currently have up.

One of the things that makes it difficult to set up is that this room, through some odd decisions made by previous owners also acts as a "hallway" of sorts that is used by my wife and I and guests to get to the restroom in the house and as such there needs to be a pretty clear lane through the room.

Because of that I have my desk facing one of the long walls of the room in order to keep it out of the way and as such my head is currently dead center in the middle of the room...not good I know.

So what I'm looking for is any general advice that those of you which much more experience than me might have after looking at my layout to make my room better. I also have some specific questions...

1. Since the room isn't extremely rectangular (12'x9') does the "facing the short wall" rule really matter that much?

2. Is it going to be worse to have my head in the center of the room or have the monitors all the way up against the wall?

3. I could also face the short wall but I would have to have the desk off center (nearly up against one of the side walls) to allow room for the "hallway" through the room. Would it be worse to be this asymmetrical than is would be to face the long wall?


Sorry if any of this is confusing, hopefully looking at the image will give a good idea of what I'm asking but it's still hard to picture a room you've never been in! Thanks for any and all tips you might have!

-Adam

Attached Images
File Type: png Mixing Room Layout.png (55.9 KB, 873 views)
Old 11th September 2011
  #2
Here for the gear
 

Ah, one more question...

My monitors are now 33" apart. Is that generally too close together? Any closer and it's going to be hard to get an equilateral triangle that doesn't stick my head dead center in the room.

Thanks again!
Old 5th October 2011
  #3
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I would really love to hear some feedback from the great minds here!
Old 5th October 2011
  #4
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Measurements?

If you could shoot some measurements and take some pictures, that might be more useful than drawings. The more the merrier (ETC, waterfall, etc.)

As hard (impossible?) as it is to evaluate room acoustics in a forum, it's even harder when things out of the norm are present (such as the pass-through hallway).
Old 5th October 2011
  #5
Gear Guru
Waste

Sticking or trying to stick to rules of thumb in a domestic situation is the fast lane of the highway to palookaville.
e.g.
Speakers are often best almost touching the wall.
Boggy has recently repeatedly found 19% better than 38%, by measurement, not prediction.
Unless the walls are identical, symmetry is a vain goal.

The only sure way to optimise your speaker and listening position is to take measurements. https://www.gearslutz.com/board/studi...er-v2-1-a.html

And please do open the playing field, no assumptions, no rules, any domestically viable configuration may be the optimum sonic one.

DD
Old 5th October 2011
  #6
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
Quote:
1. Since the room isn't extremely rectangular (12'x9') does the "facing the short wall" rule really matter that much?
It is always better to face the short wall. You can work around it but it will just take more treatment which is seems you really do not have all that much to began with.

Quote:
2. Is it going to be worse to have my head in the center of the room or have the monitors all the way up against the wall?
Generally speaking YES.

Quote:
3. I could also face the short wall but I would have to have the desk off center (nearly up against one of the side walls) to allow room for the "hallway" through the room. Would it be worse to be this asymmetrical than is would be to face the long wall?
You do not want to be off center that far.

I would test the room how you have it and see how it looks/sounds.
Old 12th November 2011
  #7
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hereticskeptic's Avatar
Is it cool to have the desk placed off-center about 16" (along the short wall of length 13')?

It's a more ideal setup, as far as space is concerned, for me to position my rear wall panels, so that the end of the left panel is 41" from the left wall, and the end of the right panel is 29" from the right wall. This is so that the end of the left panel is not right next to you, as you enter the door to the room.

Consequently, I've adjusted the position of my desk, so that the center of the desk lines up with the center of the rear wall treatment. I'm just wondering if this creates a potential problem that I'm unaware of. I assume that most are placing their desk and treatment so that everything is symmetrical. The added trickery stems from the fact that the short wall is longer on the side where the desk is (13' front wall), while the rear wall is 11' 10".

Is this no good, or does it just depend?

If it's okay, should the first reflection point panels (side walls) be placed at different distances from each side wall, according to how far the desk is from each side wall?

Lastly, I am forced to place one side wall panel on a boom stand, due to a mirror being on that side, as opposed to a wall. This leaves a 9" gap between the wall and panel. The panel is a GIK 242, which is 3.5" thick, including built-in space between panel and wall. I'm just trying to make sure that having a much bigger gap between early reflection point panels will not hurt their performance. I know that a 2" panel spaced 2" from the wall is sometimes recommended, but am concerned about having a much bigger gap.

I apologize in advance if my questions are hard to understand. If I'm over-thinking this, feel free to let me know that as well. I'm just unsure if being a certain distance away from a symmetrical setup poses certain problems, and maybe I should just center the rear wall panels, no matter how tight it makes things space-wise. Also, the difference between the front and rear wall lengths is really throwing me off, as far as placing the reflection panels on side walls, and how the rear/front wall setup should be optimized.

Old 12th November 2011
  #8
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Kuras View Post
It is always better to face the short wall.
I would be careful of using the word “always”.

Here’s one scenario where it might be better to face the long wall:
Mixing Room Layout...Help me make it better!-facing-long-wall.gif
Old 17th November 2011
  #9
Gear Guru
Symmetry

heretic, symmetry is debatable. It is of course possible in a new build or such. However in these prosumer situations one choses a balance of compromises as most of the physical choices are already in place, e.g. doors windows etc.
LF symmetry is often not possible due to L and R walls being made of different materials. It is not necessarily the best compromise either as it would place the listener in a modally unfavourable spot. It can be better to be off centre. Take another look at Jens drawing.
HF symmetry can be easily established by panels on stands around the listener, irrespective of where the walls behind are.
The only way to be sure of optimum positions for speakers and listener is to learn to Measure and to understand the Measurments. Such skills will last of life and will inform the recording process greatly.
Dd
Old 17th November 2011
  #10
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
I would be careful of using the word “always”.

Here’s one scenario where it might be better to face the long wall:
Attachment 262526
Good point as the word "always" should be a no no in the world of room acoustics. Maybe a better word is "most of the time".
Old 17th November 2011
  #11
Gear Guru
Maybe

Quote:
"always" should be a no no in the world of room acoustics. Maybe a better word is "most of the time".
Never.....LOL

DD
Old 17th November 2011
  #12
Lives for gear
 
hereticskeptic's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanDan View Post
heretic, symmetry is debatable. It is of course possible in a new build or such. However in these prosumer situations one choses a balance of compromises as most of the physical choices are already in place, e.g. doors windows etc.
LF symmetry is often not possible due to L and R walls being made of different materials. It is not necessarily the best compromise either as it would place the listener in a modally unfavourable spot. It can be better to be off centre. Take another look at Jens drawing.
HF symmetry can be easily established by panels on stands around the listener, irrespective of where the walls behind are.
The only way to be sure of optimum positions for speakers and listener is to learn to Measure and to understand the Measurments. Such skills will last of life and will inform the recording process greatly.
Dd
Thanks for your reply DanDan. I really appreciate it.

I spoke to Bryan earlier this week, and we sorted it out. I'm going to position my desk s that it's centered between the longer of the front and rear wall, and thus my rear wall bass traps will be slightly off-center from my desk. This will allow me to keep the right wall reflection panel as close as possible to the right wall, as well as the front wall corner trap securely in the corner. I was worried about having the right reflection panel further from the right side wall, while the right front corner trap would still be all the way in the corner. Just seemed weird.

I think things will be fine now, though not ideal. For a space this small, there really is no ideal, haha. I look forward to moving to a better space in the near future, but am excited to finish getting things set up later today, and getting on with making some music!
Old 18th November 2011
  #13
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audiothings's Avatar
 

Quote:
It is always better to face the short wall.
NE and FTB rooms are usually wider than they are long. In general, it makes sense from a space optimization perspective in a small room, to face the short wall. The rest depends on the design concept.
Old 18th November 2011
  #14
Gear Guru
Wide

Many pro studio CR's appear to be wide. The true size and shape is often much bigger and is hidden behind trapping and cosmetic/practical surfaces.
DD
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