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What is the best Sound Proofing underlayment to put under Hard Wood floor
Old 6th September 2011
  #1
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What is the best Sound Proofing underlayment to put under Hard Wood floor

Hi,
I'm finishing a room to be used as a studio. I have just finished treating the sub-floor with a self-leveling agent and after the feathering agent will be ready for the floor. I am seeking a cost effective method by which to reduce sound transmission through the hard wood floor into the outside world as my home has a floating floor, no foundation. I will install the treatment into the sub floor. I have searched and found the best product for the price seems to be Silent Blue Silent Blue Pad Floating floor underlayment high acoustic sound moisture control . I was wondering if anyone knows if this is a reliable product or if there is a better and comparably priced underlayment?
Thanks!
Old 7th September 2011
  #2
Gear Nut
 

High quality underlayments are usually directly proportional to their thickness. Kinetics, Sound Seal, and Ecore are pretty common ones known for good products you can look at. Not sure how their pricing compares though.

Silent Blue posted an independent STC and IIC test on their underlayment which is a good sign for credibility and quality, however they did the test with a drywall ceiling filled with fiberglass below it which makes it hard to compare the test result to others (drywall ceiling below makes any underlayment look good).
Old 7th September 2011
  #3
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Thanks, that makes sense

I haven't had a chance to check out the underlayments that you suggested but I will soon! The silent blue does seem to have it's statistics loaded a bit. I will look further and get back to you. Thanks for replying!!!
Old 7th September 2011
  #4
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Jedanor's Avatar
 

The answer is, it depends. I assume you are talking about a wood based structure as opposed to concrete? What is your actual goal? Suppressing footfalls or floating the floor to increase sound transmission loss? I've conducted many many AIIC tests and a lot will depend upon the type of structure. For wood based structures, recycled rubber has tested the highest for me in the field (ecore (formerly regupol), duracoustic 8mm, etc.). I must warn you though, no underlayment eliminates the classic "thud" experienced with vibration transmission into wood structures and if your goal is to eliminate that, you will be disappointed.
Old 7th September 2011
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedanor View Post
The answer is, it depends. I assume you are talking about a wood based structure as opposed to concrete? What is your actual goal? Suppressing footfalls or floating the floor to increase sound transmission loss? I've conducted many many AIIC tests and a lot will depend upon the type of structure. For wood based structures, recycled rubber has tested the highest for me in the field (ecore (formerly regupol), duracoustic 8mm, etc.). I must warn you though, no underlayment eliminates the classic "thud" experienced with vibration transmission into wood structures and if your goal is to eliminate that, you will be disappointed.
I have a wooden subfloor, no concrete underneath, just insulation, a skin and then outside world. I am really hoping to reduce the noise heard outside through the floor without compromising anything acoustically. I am considering recording at higher volumes instead of just acoustic guitar or brass instruments. It would include aggressive acoustic drumming and well amplified electric guitar. I understand what is necessary with the walls and windows. I'm just trying to absorb some room noise and I may also implement an insulated riser for drums and amps to further prevent sound transmission to the outside world through the floor. I don't have the bucks it takes to float a floor with insulation/sub floor/insulating pad/insulating wood/2nd sub floor/hard wood floor. If it doesn't work, I'll just record all the loud instruments elsewhere.
...so.... I have the bucks to purchase a decent underlayment to go above the subfloor and beneath the hard wood floor I will be installing.
And that's the gist of it!
Old 8th September 2011
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gohanto View Post
High quality underlayments are usually directly proportional to their thickness. Kinetics, Sound Seal, and Ecore are pretty common ones known for good products you can look at. Not sure how their pricing compares though.

Silent Blue posted an independent STC and IIC test on their underlayment which is a good sign for credibility and quality, however they did the test with a drywall ceiling filled with fiberglass below it which makes it hard to compare the test result to others (drywall ceiling below makes any underlayment look good).
We'll I've checked out the underlayments you suggested and they all appear to be very good, especially the sound eater and kinetics products. I guess what comes to mind is that they are all effective when combined with gypsum, multiple layers of plywood, and hardwood flooring (or whatever flooring you choose). It practically seems independent to the product as long as you lay on top of sub floor: treatment, plywood, gypsum, plywood, hardwood floor (my top layer). Possibly even a plywood layer above the sub floor to thicken up the bottom layer.
That amounts to 6 inches of flooring. I'm not sure if I'm willing to do that.
It seems like impacta-sound eater treatment is the least number of layers but still effective. That's what I'm gearing for at this point. If it's not enough I think I can enhance sound deadening with a well designed riser stage for drums or electric guitar rigs.
BTW, when they mention gypsum in the installation directions, are they referring to the same gypsum boards used for walls? Just wanted to double check to be sure. Not too crazy of an idea, just want to be sure I didn't make some elementary error!
Then I can invest in a floating wall for the two walls that contact the outside ....and everything else.
Thanks for the tips! I really appreciate it!
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