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WAREHOUSE studio Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 18th December 2010
  #1
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Arrow WAREHOUSE studio

How well would a just 'big open space' /warehouse with tall ceilings (10-17ft) and ~ 1000+ sf work for a budget studio?

Gobos for 'treatment' ?
Old 18th December 2010
  #2
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jhbrandt's Avatar
Many have tried this with varying degrees of success.

One common factor with the successful large room studios is room treatment. Gobos and movable panels do not go very far in removing the 5 - 15 second reverberation tail. - Unless you have a LOT of them. The RT60 can be reduced quickly and efficiently using the absorption panels next to room boundaries where they will be more effective. In other words - room treatment.

I would recommend this procedure to bring the decay down to the maximum desired. Angled plywood panels on the walls and ceilings will help break up flutter and add dispersions without absorbing. Some of these angled panels can be hinged with absorption material on the reverse side for adjusting the decay in the room.

In a nutshell; Bigger room require a bigger budget - to get it right.

Cheers,
John
Old 18th December 2010
  #3
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hmmm I was thinking more space= easier to deal with sound....

would it be better/more ecoonomical/efficient to use a small space ( say 20x20x9 like a garage i suppose) and try to record full volume half stacks, bass rigs, drum kits, etc (maybe one by one /overdub)?
Old 18th December 2010
  #4
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John Suitcase's Avatar
 

I've recorded in big open spaces with good results. Some sound deadening can be helpful, you want to tame any flutter echoes, especially. Carpet on the floor can bring the reverb time down considerably, too.

If you're hoping to create a perfect audio environment, it'll cost big money. If you're trying to create a workable space, it's not that hard. Deal with any major issues, then use your ears.

Wavelab in Tucson is an example of a one-room studio in a warehouse. They've recorded some pretty successful stuff, I don't think they have major issues...
Old 20th December 2010
  #5
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Btw, what's so 'bad' about all this reverb?
Old 20th December 2010
  #6
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bassjam's Avatar
 

You dont want reverb when recording guitar and bass cabs!

I take it your going to have a seperate control room?
Old 20th December 2010
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bassjam View Post
You dont want reverb when recording guitar and bass cabs!

I take it your going to have a seperate control room?
No sep. CR. just open big empty room..=low cost..why would reverb be bad on bass/gtr. cab recording? It would add character and fullness...what am I missing here?
Old 20th December 2010
  #8
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jhbrandt's Avatar
Ya'll have fun! - And you will. It's all part of the 'experience' & paying your dues. Enjoy it and learn... that's what life is about.

Cheers,
John
Old 20th December 2010
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhbrandt View Post
Ya'll have fun! - And you will. It's all part of the 'experience' & paying your dues. Enjoy it and learn... that's what life is about.

Cheers,
John
Thanks,

It'd be good if you could add some more insight.
Old 20th December 2010
  #10
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Similar situation.... My first question would be how much noise is going on within the warehouse in the first place? How much outside noise? You should probably worry about isolating your recordings from this outside noise first. Your recordings will probably sound better than when you were in a smaller room. No kidding...... However it is tough to isolate from outside noise. Quality dynamics and SDC's will be your friend while you are in the initial transition...ie, Till you have walls. As you are in there more and more, try to identify the sources of the noise. When you have a better idea of the specific problems, the pros here can give you better advice. Good luck!!!
Old 20th December 2010
  #11
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jhbrandt's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdfdsa View Post
...It'd be good if you could add some more insight.
OK.

Back in 2001 I had the pleasure to work with Eddie Kramer on a session with Chicago rock-blues player Jimmy D. Lane. He hired 'Double Trouble' from Texas to come up to an old church-turned into a studio called Blue Heaven Studios in Salina Kansas.
-- Long story short; Eddie looked around and clapped his hands here and there and out in the large tracking area that used to be a small cathedral and said, "Too big for a good tight rock drum sound, let's put the kit over here..." referring to the area in front of the control room that is under the old balcony. There it had 11 - 12 foot ceilings. He placed the kit about 10 feet from the walls plus we stacked some gobos toward the large open area to cut the verb.
I have a track from the session here. It didn't turn out too bad...

To start with, since you are in an industrial area, I would suggest that you put your efforts into absorption panels - as many as you can afford to build. Some for ceilings, some for walls, & some for free-standing use.

Cheers,
John

Last edited by jhbrandt; 20th December 2010 at 04:27 PM.. Reason: forgot link
Old 20th December 2010
  #12
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Glenn Kuras's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhbrandt View Post
OK.

Back in 2001 I had the pleasure to work with Eddie Kramer on a session with Chicago rock-blues player Jimmy D. Lane. He hired 'Double Trouble' from Texas to come up to an old church-turned into a studio called Blue Heaven Studios in Salina Kansas.
-- Long story short; Eddie looked around and clapped his hands here and there and out in the large tracking area that used to be a small cathedral and said, "Too big for a good tight rock drum sound, let's put the kit over here..." referring to the area in front of the control room that is under the old balcony. There it had 11 - 12 foot ceilings. He placed the kit about 10 feet from the walls plus we stacked some gobos toward the large open area to cut the verb.
I have a track from the session here. It didn't turn out too bad...

To start with, since you are in an industrial area, I would suggest that you put your efforts into absorption panels - as many as you can afford to build. Some for ceilings, some for walls, & some for free-standing use.

Cheers,
John
A few months back I had some friends come by the office and they wanted to record drums in our warehouse. I would say it is around 4 to 5000 square feet. heh I ended up taking pallets of mineral wool and rigid fiberglass and putting that around the drums. As much "fun" as we had, controlling a large area like that was a bitch. The one thing I did find fun though was playing with the overheads and room mic. It was like adjusting a $10K reverb unit. lol lol Not sure if I would want to do it daily though.
Old 21st December 2010
  #13
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by charlesaustin View Post
Similar situation.... My first question would be how much noise is going on within the warehouse in the first place? How much outside noise?
Full volume halfstacks bass/gtr, drums, piano, horn, etc. so idk ~120db? Outside noise, don't know yet, just looking around at warehouses, and using this thread as a sounding board to see how plausible an idea this is, but chances are it wouldn't be very quiet [outside], atleast until after-hours perhaps...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhbrandt View Post
OK.

Back in 2001 I had the pleasure to work with Eddie Kramer on a session with Chicago rock-blues player Jimmy D. Lane. He hired 'Double Trouble' from Texas to come up to an old church-turned into a studio called Blue Heaven Studios in Salina Kansas.
-- Long story short; Eddie looked around and clapped his hands here and there and out in the large tracking area that used to be a small cathedral and said, "Too big for a good tight rock drum sound, let's put the kit over here..." referring to the area in front of the control room that is under the old balcony. There it had 11 - 12 foot ceilings. He placed the kit about 10 feet from the walls plus we stacked some gobos toward the large open area to cut the verb.
I have a track from the session here. It didn't turn out too bad...

To start with, since you are in an industrial area, I would suggest that you put your efforts into absorption panels - as many as you can afford to build. Some for ceilings, some for walls, & some for free-standing use.

Cheers,
John
Neat, thanks for that...you have any suggestions for bang/buck absorption paneling / diy / materials etc.?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Kuras View Post
A few months back I had some friends come by the office and they wanted to record drums in our warehouse. I would say it is around 4 to 5000 square feet. heh I ended up taking pallets of mineral wool and rigid fiberglass and putting that around the drums. As much "fun" as we had, controlling a large area like that was a bitch. The one thing I did find fun though was playing with the overheads and room mic. It was like adjusting a $10K reverb unit. lol lol Not sure if I would want to do it daily though.

What about isolating the condenser mics themselves instead of the whole room...i.e. surround sdc/ldc's w/ an ''absorption box'' ...dynamics shouldn't really have a problem with the rev./room as it wont be picking much up - no?


Thanks everyone.
Old 21st December 2010
  #14
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John Suitcase's Avatar
 

How much are you looking to spend?

Get some carpet/rugs you can roll out, get some heavy drapes you can adjust, get some nice moving blankets you can throw over things and hang from mic stands,etc. If you are worried about low end, you could get/build some traps, too.

The thing about a large space is that you're going to get a sound, and if it's not what you're after, it'll be a pain in your ass. If it is what you're after, it'll be pretty easy to work with.

But you're going to have a hard time making those super-polished, dry r&b type tracks. You'll have a great time if rock, indie, garage, etc are your mainstays. Metal may be problematic, unless you're planning to sample replace much of the drums anyway.

I'd much rather work in a big open one-room space than a small bedroom, no matter how much treatment that small room has, but that's just me...
Old 21st December 2010
  #15
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Well, you could biuld cheap interior walls (2x4 and drywall) around instruments and have an open floor plan right? like three sided rooms (openly angled) around piano, drums, cabs, etc... how would that cut down, pretty well?


/--\ <--kinda like that
Old 21st December 2010
  #16
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johndykstra's Avatar
 

even with a wall missing, the confined space would have modal issues of a small space.
Old 24th December 2010
  #17
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jhbrandt's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdfdsa View Post
Well, you could biuld cheap interior walls (2x4 and drywall) around instruments and have an open floor plan right? like three sided rooms (openly angled) around piano, drums, cabs, etc... how would that cut down, pretty well?


/--\ <--kinda like that
Make gobos to do that. Building walls would not be too effective in isolation, being open and would only offer up to STC20 - no isolation below 150Hz (my guess)

suggestions for cheap panels: Several ways to do this with little money. Use old shipping pallets for the wood. Build frames of available wood sizes.. fill with attic blanket insulation (cheap) and cover completely with the 'on sale' fabric at JoAnn fabrics. Be sure to cross brace the back of the panel to keep it square.

Cheers,
John
Old 24th December 2010
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhbrandt View Post
Make gobos to do that. Building walls would not be too effective in isolation, being open and would only offer up to STC20 - no isolation below 150Hz (my guess)

suggestions for cheap panels: Several ways to do this with little money. Use old shipping pallets for the wood. Build frames of available wood sizes.. fill with attic blanket insulation (cheap) and cover completely with the 'on sale' fabric at JoAnn fabrics. Be sure to cross brace the back of the panel to keep it square.

Cheers,
John
Thanks for the tips....about the attic insulation..wouldnt you have issues with the fiberglass ging into the air and what not? I mean I've heard of it being a common acoustic treatment, but I've always wondered if the fabric really keeps you from breathing particles.....
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