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Angled walls - Quick Question.
Old 13th November 2009
  #1
Angled walls - Quick Question.

Just a quick question. Now I know Angled walls are always better than parallel. The room I am working in has parallel walls to begin with but I have the luxury of building a structure (within reason) as apose to just putting up panels in the corner.

My question is if I am making an angled faux wall, Is it better to make the wall with the drywall or just make it a fabric wall stuffed with insulation?

If you see the picture I used a red line to indicate where the drywall would be and the blue filling would be the insulation panel on TOP of the new angled wall (and I would also put insulation behind the drywall for more bass absorption- yellow colour). Or should I just scrap the drywall (redline) and fill the entire space with insulation?

I hope everyone understands the question.
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Angled walls - Quick Question.-room.jpg  
Old 13th November 2009
  #2
Angled walls are not "always" preferred, but certainly there are many times in acoustically small rooms, including control rooms, where well-chosen angles can have advantages.

If you make an angled "wall" simply a soft partition, you still have a rectangular room from the perspective of low frequency modal behavior. However, depending on the the construction, depth, and what is behind, you may be able to absorb enough bass to mitigate any concerns. A solid wall of sheetrock on studs will actually change the bass behavior (independent of trapping), but even then, some of the bass will transmit rather than reflect. The more massive and rigid the construction, the more bass it will contain (reflect back into the room rather than transmit to adjacent spaces), and the greater the excitation of the room modes.

You should also be clear about why you are desiring to change the geometry. Is it to help create the RFZ, avoiding early mid/high reflections at the listening position? Is it to eliminate flutter? Are you hoping to improve modal response? Non-rectangular geometry will indeed change the bass behavior, but no necessarily in a way that you always expect or can easily predict. It doesn't remove the need for trapping, but may change the required type or location.

Also, in your drawing, it looks like you are leaving a bunch of parallel surface behind your front triangles, not to mention on other surfaces (front/back; floor/ceiling?). It's difficult to plan acoustics a single piece at a time. It all works together, and one thing will affect another. You need a whole-room plan so that the various elements of construction and treatment work together. The size of the room, ratio of dimensions, intended use, ergonomic or practical considerations, gear and furniture, budget etc. will all have an impact on arriving at the best solution for the situation at hand.
Old 13th November 2009
  #3
While less elegant and probably a bit less detailed, I'll toss a couple of things on the fire to see how they burn...

Working backwards from the "ideal" mix environment is the approach I took;

Starting from the 38% from front wall position, setting up an equilateral triangle whose angle is 60 degrees yields a potentially wider and deeper sweet spot. (I've all but confirmed this to be the case here in my new digs.)

That equilateral triangle actually yields front wall angles of 30 degrees.

The flatter angle of the front walls does several things for you. Primarily, it gives you more volume behind the angled walls to place broadband absorption. The secondary is that if you make the wall mostly absorptive, you effectively deal with SBIR, without having to deal with it by adding extra panels.

I agree that you really do want to remove the wall surface behind the angled walls. Otherwise, you pretty much still have parallel walls to low frequencies.
Old 13th November 2009
  #4
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Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

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I'll get right to the point. heh

That room will not benefit from adding angled drywall. Stuffing the corners with rigid fiberglass is the correct approach.

--Ethan
Old 15th November 2009
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer View Post
I'll get right to the point. heh

That room will not benefit from adding angled drywall. Stuffing the corners with rigid fiberglass is the correct approach.

--Ethan
My man!
Old 15th November 2009
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhbrandt View Post
My man!
Back atcha John, your posts are always excellent and insightful.

--Ethan
Old 23rd November 2009
  #7
Thanks, I am going to stuff like crazy!!!
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