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Drum risers, low frequency, deliberate phase cancellation
Old 4th July 2009
  #1
Gear Head
 

Drum risers, low frequency, deliberate phase cancellation

I have been reading up on sound isloaton for drums. It seems that the kick drum is the most difficult one to control.

I've read repeatedly that mass + air/space = better isolation.

Ideally, I could record acoustic drums in my home. However, neighbors are a big concern. I have not taken an SPL measurement yet, but I am positive they will know when someone is hitting a kick drum.

Unfortunately, I live an area fairly removed from any rehearsal spaces (1 hr+ away), and electronic drums don't feel or sound the same.

I would very much prefer to be able to track acoustic drums for recording purposes -- I just find them much more inspiring.


Questions:

1. What extent, if any, would a correctly built drum riser have on sound isolation and low frequency attenuation? It seems that it would decouple the kick from the floor, but the airborne transmission would still affect walls and the ceiling, correct? I've read reports where people state that it tightens things up, but all of these reports are from drummers ON the riser / inside the room and thus cannot comment what someone 30' away might be hearing.


2. Why not use deliberate phase cancellation to take out sub 125 Hz frequencies? I didn't come across anything on this, so maybe it's not cost effective, practical, etc. I am envisioning a simple drum iso booth with a Low Frequency Killer tone generator outside of it. Would the LFK take out the low end inside the iso booth as well? The math and theory on this one is over my head.
Old 4th July 2009
  #2

I actually did a cross-over based on this idea as a final project in college...

If you come up with an active cancelation system, the results are dependant on where you are. If you put it oustide the recording room, on neighbor A side, it may make things worse for neighbor B. The only way to get them both happy is to put active cancelation at the source. This is in your room and will change what you record.

A floating floor for your kit will decouple the structure and is likely to help - but there are no garauntees without major construction (Search for "Two leaf").

Seriously - take the resonant head off, loosen the batter and put a bunch of pillows in the shell and just kill the kick. Replace it with a sample later. You'll never hear the thud in the overheads or floor tom mics if you get it dead enough.



-tINY

Old 4th July 2009
  #3
Gear Head
 

Thanks, I will try that next!
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