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Help choosing between different ceiling options in garage studio
Old 17th September 2020
  #1
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Help choosing between different ceiling options in garage studio

Hello,

I'm working on converting my 2 gar garage into a room for casual jamming and an amateur studio. It will mostly be electric guitar, bass guitar, and acoustic drums being used in there. I'm having trouble trying to decide the best option for the ceiling construction in this room. I know that in general more ceiling height is better but I'm limited due to the ceiling joists. I'm primarily concerned with which of these options would provide the best acoustics.

Quick details of the garage: The garage is a concrete slab floor with 3 concrete block walls and then the 2 garage doors in the front. The roof is wood board sheathing with shingles on top and 2x6" rafters spaced 24" apart. There are 2x10 ceiling joists running across the garage spaced 24" apart. The bottom of the ceiling joists are at a height of 8' 6". The inside of the garage is going to be wood framed with insulation and drywall but I'm not sure the best way to go on the ceiling. The 3 options I see are:

1) Create a flat ceiling by attaching drywall to the bottom of the ceiling joists. This would be the easiest option however the bottom of the ceiling joists are at a height of 8 ft 6 inches so the room ceiling would be no more than 8' 4" to 8' 5". I'm concerned this ceiling height may be too low for decent acoustics.

2) Create a flat ceiling by attaching drywall to the top of the ceiling joists. This will move the drywall up another 9" giving a ceiling height of about 9' 3". This would leave the ceiling joists below the drywall exposed in the room. I'm not sure if exposed ceiling joists across the ceiling will have any negative affect on the room acoustics or if the minimal height gain here will even make much of a difference.

3) Create a vaulted ceiling by adding 2x10 sister rafters and collar ties to existing garage roof. Attach drywall to sister rafters and collar ties. The ceiling joists would be completely exposed but the ceiling height would be much higher than the first 2 options. I would guess 12-14 ft at the peak. This would add substantial cost due to the increased material and labor required. I'm also not sure if there is any concern with adding the load of drywall onto the existing garage roof frame.


Any opinions or feedback are appreciated! Thanks!
Old 17th September 2020
  #2
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Jason Foi's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HastyRichtardo View Post
Hello,

I'm working on converting my 2 gar garage into a room for casual jamming and an amateur studio. It will mostly be electric guitar, bass guitar, and acoustic drums being used in there. I'm having trouble trying to decide the best option for the ceiling construction in this room. I know that in general more ceiling height is better but I'm limited due to the ceiling joists. I'm primarily concerned with which of these options would provide the best acoustics.

Quick details of the garage: The garage is a concrete slab floor with 3 concrete block walls and then the 2 garage doors in the front. The roof is wood board sheathing with shingles on top and 2x6" rafters spaced 24" apart. There are 2x10 ceiling joists running across the garage spaced 24" apart. The bottom of the ceiling joists are at a height of 8' 6". The inside of the garage is going to be wood framed with insulation and drywall but I'm not sure the best way to go on the ceiling. The 3 options I see are:

1) Create a flat ceiling by attaching drywall to the bottom of the ceiling joists. This would be the easiest option however the bottom of the ceiling joists are at a height of 8 ft 6 inches so the room ceiling would be no more than 8' 4" to 8' 5". I'm concerned this ceiling height may be too low for decent acoustics.

2) Create a flat ceiling by attaching drywall to the top of the ceiling joists. This will move the drywall up another 9" giving a ceiling height of about 9' 3". This would leave the ceiling joists below the drywall exposed in the room. I'm not sure if exposed ceiling joists across the ceiling will have any negative affect on the room acoustics or if the minimal height gain here will even make much of a difference.

3) Create a vaulted ceiling by adding 2x10 sister rafters and collar ties to existing garage roof. Attach drywall to sister rafters and collar ties. The ceiling joists would be completely exposed but the ceiling height would be much higher than the first 2 options. I would guess 12-14 ft at the peak. This would add substantial cost due to the increased material and labor required. I'm also not sure if there is any concern with adding the load of drywall onto the existing garage roof frame.


Any opinions or feedback are appreciated! Thanks!
Always check with a structural engineer before you add considerable weight to a structure.

Option 2 or 3 would be nice. If you do option 2 you could fill in the 9" cavity between the rafters with roxul safe n sound and have a really nice ceiling. This would also leave space for hvac above the ceiling.

Are you not trying to build for isolation?
Old 17th September 2020
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Hi Jason,

I actually did have a structural engineer come out to see if I could raise the ceiling joists. He said the most I can raise them is 6” (from 8’ to 8’ 6”). We discussed some of the room ideas and he didn’t have any concerns but if I went with option 3 I would probably confirm the details with him.

Do you mean fill the space between the exposed ceiling joists in the room with roxul? Would this make a dead sounding room without any reflective surfaces on the ceiling? I’d like to have some natural reverb especially for room mics.

I’m trying to build for isolation as well but not sure if there will be much difference in isolation between these 3 ceiling options.
Old 19th September 2020
  #4
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Does anyone have any input on a room with exposed ceiling joists? Will exposed ceiling joists cause acoustic issues?
Old 19th September 2020 | Show parent
  #5
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Jason Foi's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HastyRichtardo View Post
Hi Jason,

I actually did have a structural engineer come out to see if I could raise the ceiling joists. He said the most I can raise them is 6” (from 8’ to 8’ 6”). We discussed some of the room ideas and he didn’t have any concerns but if I went with option 3 I would probably confirm the details with him.

Do you mean fill the space between the exposed ceiling joists in the room with roxul? Would this make a dead sounding room without any reflective surfaces on the ceiling? I’d like to have some natural reverb especially for room mics.

I’m trying to build for isolation as well but not sure if there will be much difference in isolation between these 3 ceiling options.
Yes, i meant fill the space between joists entirely. It doesnt have to be dead. You can still add some reflective strips or something to preserve the HF energy..

You might enjoy the following thread

Garage Build: How To Prevent Flanking from Rafter Ties / Collar Ties
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