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Acoustic treatment of small corner home studio
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Acoustic treatment of small corner home studio

Hi!

I'm looking for an easy and affordable acoustic treatment solution that can make my little corner home studio sound better โ€“ specifically for voiceover/spoken word/podcasting.

In the attached image you can see my quick SketchUp version of my general setup. (That's a floating mic, yes.)

The approx. distance between the mic and the back wall is 3 feet.

I'm thinking some foam panels on the wall behind me would do a lot to dampen the sound, kill the reverb and create a more professional broadcast quality to my voice recordings.

(I know a corner like this is far from ideal, but it's the only setup that works โ€“ the room doubles as many different things.)

Any advice?

Thanks in advance!
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Acoustic treatment of small corner home studio-corner-studio.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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If that is your only space in the corner, then rotate everything 135ยฐ to the left so that the desk is straddling the corner. Why? What you need in front of the listening position is symmetry. If you cannot move to half way between the wall to your left and the wall to your right, straddling the corner will give you a way to get symmetry.

Get those monitors up to ear level, preferably on stands and close to the walls, still creating an equilateral triangle - speaker, speaker, a spot about 9" behind your head.

Hang a trap from the ceiling and put traps next to each speaker - all at what are called first reflection points. If you don't understand the phrase, say so, and we can explain in more depth as that will help you work out exactly where to place the traps.

Make two tall gobos to stand behind where you will now be sitting, and fill the triangular space created by the desk straddling the corner with a floor to ceiling trap, preferably filling the whole triangular space; if you cannot do that at least have a trap that stands behind the desk and likewise straddles the corner, also floor to ceiling.

If you do choose foam over mineral wool, make sure it is at the very minimum 4" deep, preferably 8" for each trap.

Last edited by Starlight; 1 week ago at 12:40 PM.. Reason: clarity
Old 1 week ago
  #3
SRS
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Avoid foam. Use OC 703/705 or the like. Mineral wool works well. Foam is... well, foam. It is not the best acoustic control choice. And yes, re-arrange the desk so YOU are not in the corner.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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Hi!

Thanks so much for your replies!

I should clarify two things:
ยท There is sadly not room to rotate the desk 135 degrees. (It's a tight space in a room, which, like I mentioned, doubles as many different things โ€“ย there is a large bookshelf and queen size guest bed to the right of the desk.)

ยท The monitors are actually already on stands that bring them ear-level โ€“ย I didn't think this would factor into the advice I would receive, so I didn't add this detail in SketchUp. Sorry for the confusion!
Also, I am happy with how the sound comes out of the monitors, i.e. in terms of playback. I am strictly wanting to improve the recording of my voice.

As such, I am curious about what kind of treatment I can put on the wall behind me โ€“ย or next to me, or in the corner etc.

For instance, would a set of OC 703/705 panels behind offer a significant improvement?

Another approach: I can't move the desk, but of course I can move myself and the mic โ€“ย so if I'm in the middle of the room with further distance to the wall behind/in front of me, would that potentially help?

I know the solution won't be ideal or exactly up to fully professional standards. But hopefully there's a way I can make some improvements without having to convince my wife that a fully-fledged recording studio is more important than having a guest room!
Old 6 days ago
  #5
SRS
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Well. We all know that a recording studio is MUCH more important than any guest bedroom could ever hope to be! And you can most certainly get "professional" results for voice over/vocals in a small room with a bit of effort. You just have to "take the bedroom" out of the room sound. More often deader is better in this instance. And yes, 703/705 will help noticeably. Depends on how you define significantly. It's the comb-filtering and parallel walls that make for less than desirable acoustics.

Even using one of the various vocal wrap-around "screens" available will help quite a lot.
Old 6 days ago
  #6
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Haha, well, yes, but someone might beg to differ.

So, if I were to get some of those OC 703/705 panels, what would the ideal placement be? On the wall right behind me?

And by vocal wrap-around screens, do you mean something like this?:
https://www.amazon.com/RF-X-Electron...3627368&sr=8-2

If yes, would that one be a good choice, or do you have a specific different one in mind you'd recommend over that?

(Not asking you to do my research for me โ€“ย just curious if there's a go-to solution I oughta know about!)
Old 6 days ago
  #7
SRS
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Behind you, to the sides and if a ceiling that is parallel to the floor/desk and especially if a lower ceiling, on it, or cloud it. Creating a make-shift vocal booth per se. And yes, a device like you linked to. I don't have any specific recommendations on brand though. With a good vocal mic (like the trusty SM7) and a decent interface/preamp/converter, that can get you in the realm of pro results.
Old 6 days ago
  #8
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Awesome, thanks so much! I have the Scarlett 2i2 and the MXL 770, so I'd like to think I'm approaching the realm of SEMI-pro at least
Old 4 days ago
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrenceT View Post
So, if I were to get some of those OC 703/705 panels, what would the ideal placement be? On the wall right behind me?
All around you, with the exception of the floor.

Small rooms sound small so make them disappear acoustically.
Old 4 days ago
  #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrenceT View Post
For instance, would a set of OC 703/705 panels behind offer a significant improvement?
Depends on the depth. If you know the gas flow resistivity of your materials, try to shoot for a good absorption coefficient at 100 Hz here: http://www.acousticmodelling.com/porous.php

(Not sure if there's a consensus on what a "good" absorption coefficient is but maybe .8?)
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