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Best location for I/O panel box in control and live rooms
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Best location for I/O panel box in control and live rooms

Hi
I’m reading conflicting and confusing answers. Is there a definitive answer to where is best to internaly mount an XLR/TRS (etc) audio I/O panel box in control and live rooms? I would think the least amount of cable running the better for transmissions sake, is that correct or should the two be as far apart as possible ?

Seems like cutting a big hole for a panel box would have the MOST amount of resource material out there but it’s the least in my experience researching this step. Thanks again!

Also, we’re running a traditional 16 ch XLR TO PANEL snake behind the walls and how the heck are we going to bring the XLR cables into the control room? Just pull them through the wall and patch up around The hole? I can’t find any info on how best to bring in xlr from a snake. The Xlr Will go into the interface in the control room from live. I’m not so sure bout this one but I have this nice $500 snake I want to use

Appreciate it very much thank you in advance for any help !!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
Usually in a studio you would run unterminated multipair cable and the solder the connections on the end. This way the cable is pretty small.

As for length, I would prefer not to have 100' extra, but i wouldn't personally lose a lot of sleep here. Where you have weak signals use a cloudlifter type product and use active DI's. But also if it's too long this is where some scissors and a soldering iron come in handy.

I would run more than 16ch, and terminate to a rack panel so you can have an xlr mic level patchbay.

These are also pretty great for easiness-

https://www.amazon.com/LyxPro-4-Chan...NsaWNrPXRydWU=
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Kyle P. Gushue's Avatar
To add to what Ryan C said.

The cable is usually run via conduit. The conduit runs within the walls, and/or above the ceiling or below the floor. You incorporate bends in the pipe to help mitigate the transmission of airborne sound thru the pipe, and seal the pipe at both ends. They make isolation mounts and flanges to mitigate flanking paths. You can also construct a plug make of wood ect to cap off or plug the hole and air seal it so there is (pretty much) no weak point from a mass perspective.

One advantage to conduit vs just stapling the wire to the wall frames, or laying them on the floor within the air space between walls is the ease of snaking the wires in when installing, repairing, or adding on new wires.

As Ryan said unterminated cables keep the pipe the smallest possible. You can de-solder the connections, or cut them and de-solder or get new ones. If you don't terminate the cables you can tape the ends to the snake wire in a way so the wire is thin as practically possible. This will require a larger pipe than unterminated. I have used this method and been happy with the isolation of the assembly.

You may consider a wider pipe or several pipe runs to leave room for expansion.

The "best location" really depends on the layout of the room and what your intentions for the room are.

For a general live room you may want a 16 ch snake for the drum, and a couple other boxes on other walls for room mics, instrument/di cables, or even thick speaker cables for play back.

Its important to keep in mind walking paths and clutter when planning the location(s) for the boxes. If you place the snake box just on the other side of the control room, then you've now got 16 individual cables running around the main room floor.
Old 6 days ago
  #4
Thanks guys, so I’ve got a $500 100 foot 16 ch Nuetrik snake I really want to use though. You can imagine the bulk of the xlr heads on the other end (opposite the box). How would I get them through the pipe?? I bought so floating hooks and was just going to wrap the cable in John Mansfield soundproof insulation and lay the wrapped cable along the floating decoupled hooks inside the wall. Is this a terrible idea?

Thanks!
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Old 5 days ago
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Kyle P. Gushue's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jml designs View Post
Thanks guys, so I’ve got a $500 100 foot 16 ch Nuetrik snake I really want to use though. You can imagine the bulk of the xlr heads on the other end (opposite the box). How would I get them through the pipe?? I bought so floating hooks and was just going to wrap the cable in John Mansfield soundproof insulation and lay the wrapped cable along the floating decoupled hooks inside the wall. Is this a terrible idea?

Thanks!
It becomes and issue when you need to add, remove, or replace cables. That's why we use pipe.

You do your pipe run. Then you use masking tape, to tape the cable connectors to the snake wire. You arrange the connectors so they are the smallest diameter possible.

Then you get a wire snake and run a long string thru the pipe. The string should be 2 or 3x the lenght of the pipe. Tie a drumstick or watever to both sides of the string, this prevents you being able to pull the the string completely out of the pipe.

Now you tie the string to the snake, pull it thru the conduit. Done. You leave the string in the pipe, so in the future you can use it to pull more wire thru.

There is no reason to wrap the wire in insulation in the method you propose. Your method would work, but is not near ideal, since it makes it nearly impossible to replace the wire or service it, once the several layers of air sealed drywall are in. You would have to painstakingly cut new holes in the wall and fish new wire thru. Which is super annoying. There is also the chance that the wire could slip off the hook, if for instance someone yanks on it and its not fastened at the end. This would put strain on the connectors and you'd need to service the wire, and would never be able to get the wire back on the hook, cuz its buried.

Plan then buy what you need. Thats the order of operation. Don't buy until you know exactly what you need on paper.

Your other option besides conduit in the wall is to just run the snake wire on the insides of the room, attached to the finish molding, in surface mount conduit, or behind the moulding. This way you don't have conduit in the wall and its somewhat easier than hooks to snake the wire thru the holes for repair.

I prefer conduit for chases in between the walls, wether or not i use surface mount in the rooms themselves.
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