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Understanding a tone analyser chart
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
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Understanding a tone analyser chart

Hello everyone,

So I'm cutting straight to the chase. (forgive me if I do not use correct terms for what I am describing - noobie)

I live 2 floors above a restaurant with over 6/7+ machines several of which produce a lot of noise and due to their being coupled to the structure of the building produce a lot of reverberation, which is transmitted up through the walls and flooding into my flat, thereafter producing a feedback-like resonance.

I have downloaded an application on my phone that analyzes the tone but I do not have the skill to read it.

What I am trying to find out, is if the sound's decibel levels are considered annoying or I'm just being a snowflake, they are harmful but not considered to be illegal by law, are flat out illegal.

100hz at -60 dbFS is the highest signature reading on the chart. (no idea if I said that correctly)

I would appreciate it greatly if you can help me out as I am trying to sort this matter out with the restaurant owner and I'm close to buying some rockwool to build a few rockwool panels and attempt to insulate the sound even further.

https://imgur.com/88VMenB

Thanks!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
You need a calibrated SPL meter or SPL calibrated measurement mic in order to get usable data.

Adding some rockwool to your walls will do absolutely nothing for isolation. The only viable option is to address the source. Simply decoupling the machine from the floor (if on floor) might be all that it takes.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
You need a calibrated SPL meter or SPL calibrated measurement mic in order to get usable data.

Adding some rockwool to your walls will do absolutely nothing for isolation. The only viable option is to address the source. Simply decoupling the machine from the floor (if on floor) might be all that it takes.
Hello Jens, thanks for the reply.

Does adding shock absorbing material to the wall where the source of the reverberation is located work at all?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tullu View Post
Hello Jens, thanks for the reply.

Does adding shock absorbing material to the wall where the source of the reverberation is located work at all?
No.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #5
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Your best bet is probably to tell the owner of the machine to decouple it from the floor (or whatever surface it´s connected to).
Old 2 weeks ago
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
Your best bet is probably to tell the owner of the machine to decouple it from the floor (or whatever surface it´s connected to).
Your advice was the most helpful I have received yet.

I spoke to the owner a few minutes ago for what ended up as a very productive conversation. The machines were indeed noticeably vibrating the walls and floor of the room they were placed in.

We will be working on decoupling the machines within the next few days.

Thanks for your help Jens!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Glad to help
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