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"soundproofing" for $5000??
Old 23rd October 2019
  #1
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"soundproofing" for $5000??

How much sound leakage reduction can I expect for £5000? Is this at all realistic?

Here are the details:

-Dimensions are approx. 4m x 4m, 3m in height.
-Sound levels will be under 80db: low to mid volume small monitors, cello, low volume small amps, soft piano. Prior to this if always worked from domestic premises and never had any complaints.
-The room is one of a number of art studios in an old factory. Units to either side with a door to a corridor with more units on the other side.
-Room construction is board mounted on ply frame for walls to 3 sides, brick on one side, ceiling is board with large cavity above, floor is timber with a cavity below.
-Window is double glazed. Window can not be covered. Not too concerned with outside noise, mainly the adjoining units.
-Door is not solid. Can be replaced
-Current sound leakage is very high to adjoining units and corridor. i.e normal levels of conversation can be heard.
-Not diy'ing it so will need to include labour costs

I'm not expecting abbey road, I just don't want to disturb people in adjacent units with my piano/cello which I play very quietly.
Old 23rd October 2019
  #2
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Jason Foi's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PHILTHENOISE View Post
How much sound leakage reduction can I expect for £5000? Is this at all realistic?

Here are the details:

-Dimensions are approx. 4m x 4m, 3m in height.
-Sound levels will be under 80db: low to mid volume small monitors, cello, low volume small amps, soft piano. Prior to this if always worked from domestic premises and never had any complaints.
-The room is one of a number of art studios in an old factory. Units to either side with a door to a corridor with more units on the other side.
-Room construction is board mounted on ply frame for walls to 3 sides, brick on one side, ceiling is board with large cavity above, floor is timber with a cavity below.
-Window is double glazed. Window can not be covered. Not too concerned with outside noise, mainly the adjoining units.
-Door is not solid. Can be replaced
-Current sound leakage is very high to adjoining units and corridor. i.e normal levels of conversation can be heard.
-Not diy'ing it so will need to include labour costs

I'm not expecting abbey road, I just don't want to disturb people in adjacent units with my piano/cello which I play very quietly.
You could possibly spend the whole 5k on materials alone. For proper isolation it takes lots of mass and airtight cavities. The most cost effective way is with a fully decoupled MSM (mass spring mass) system. You will also need to add at a minimum a ventillation system with silencers and most likely run electrical systems. I think it will be extremely difficult to acheive with your current budget.
Old 23rd October 2019
  #3
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Thanks Jason,

As I said, I'm not looking for 100% reduction, and the sources are comparatively low db, no drumkit or loud monitoring. It's just presently REALLY bad sound leakage-wise. If I could get closer to normal sound leakage you find between domestic rooms this should be fine. The question is how far would 5k go? Would a softly played piano still bleed into the adjoining units?
Old 24th October 2019
  #4
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Jason Foi's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PHILTHENOISE View Post
Thanks Jason,

As I said, I'm not looking for 100% reduction, and the sources are comparatively low db, no drumkit or loud monitoring. It's just presently REALLY bad sound leakage-wise. If I could get closer to normal sound leakage you find between domestic rooms this should be fine. The question is how far would 5k go? Would a softly played piano still bleed into the adjoining units?
Well, that's good, 100% reduction is impossible. A standard wall will get you about a 30db reduction in the vocal range, but really next to nothing at low frequencies. In order to tame LF you have to tune your walls to well below where you want your isolation to start. Then you need lots of mass to get a reasonable reduction. You really need to figure out exactly how loud you are and at what frequencies, and how loud you need to be. Another potential source of noise is through flanking paths. You could have a 3 story building with 5 foot thick concrete walls all joined together which would do well with airborne noise, but if someone were to hit it with a hammer on the wall on the 3rd floor, you would hear it on the first. This is why a fully decoupled MSM system is important. There are a lot of unknowns so it's impossible to say how much things will cost at this point, but isolation is not cheap or easy. And like i said earlier, you must figure in ventillation for your budget. The following thread will help you understand a lot of the basics. Give it a read and we'll go from there.

Avoiding triple leaf wall question
Old 24th October 2019
  #5
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avare's Avatar
 

Jason gave you the truth.
Old 24th October 2019
  #6
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So 10k is a more realistic figure? It's only 170 sq ft and only very moderate levels of noise, surely spending that much would make difference?
I've worked in a lot of cheap practice rooms with pretty good noise separation between units, I really couldn't see those kind of places would've spent any more
than that. I mean... These places had rats in the toilets.
Old 24th October 2019
  #7
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avare's Avatar
 

An acoustic rated door with seals can cost £1 500. Then you have labour. Wall and ceiling area is ~55m2. Double layer of 15 mm thick gypsum board at £11 a sheet is ~£550 plus screws, tape, mudding, paint and labour. Nothing estimated for HVAC. Those are off the top of my head.

If there are places in your neighbourhood (Jason and I are thousands of kilometers distant and on different continents) that you like ask them about their construction.
Old 24th October 2019
  #8
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by PHILTHENOISE View Post
Would a softly played piano still bleed into the adjoining units?
An acoustic piano has very effective coupling to a wood framed floor, which is typically very effective at transferring the sound of it through flanking paths to other rooms.

I have a upstairs/downstairs setup with a wood framed floor that has a studio up and a production suite down. In the upstairs studio we have an old upright, and I also have some large studio mains that are floated (sitting on mason industry isolation springs near full deflection).

When you're downstairs, you can hear soft piano playing significantly more than someone pounding an EDM track at 105dBc on the big speakers.

Unfortunately floating just a piano wouldn't work either because anything that isn't tens of thousands of lbs will be quite wobbly when floated on iso-springs.

Maybe the rehearsal places you're talking about had a slab on grade? This is a much better starting place then wood for any sort of isolation. Decoupling is really a big deal.

The first thing you need to do if you are going to move forward with this is figure out how the sound is getting through now. Ducts? Flanking? Directly through walls?
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