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Another 'cuboid room' thread
Old 19th September 2019
  #31
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Rockwool is a brand name, like Bradford.

It is too difficult to put a mattress against the wall?
Old 20th September 2019
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avare View Post
Rockwool is a brand name, like Bradford.

It is too difficult to put a mattress against the wall?
Cool, I'll look for mineral wool then.

I do not think that a mattress will be as versatile as a rigid structure. I can't put a mattress on a stand, and cannot put it on the ledge that I have in my room.

On top of this, mattresses are not cheap, and unless I am vastly underestimating the cost of mineral wool, will be as expensive (or more expensive) than the proposed mineral wool frame.

The frames that I am looking for can be found on facebook marketplace for free.
Old 20th September 2019
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
Cool, I'll look for mineral wool then.

I do not think that a mattress will be as versatile as a rigid structure. I can't put a mattress on a stand, and cannot put it on the ledge that I have in my room.

On top of this, mattresses are not cheap, and unless I am vastly underestimating the cost of mineral wool, will be as expensive (or more expensive) than the proposed mineral wool frame.

The frames that I am looking for can be found on facebook marketplace for free.
I do not know what to write. You wrote that the problem was attachment to walls and ceilings. I adfressed that.

You wrote nothing about budget. On this continent people have gatage sales and moving sales. Mattresses are very inexpensive.

Please do not reply to people who are trying to help yoiu with new obstructions.7
Old 20th September 2019
  #34
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Trusko . . .
Have researched the very good information in this sub forum?

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/bass...nels-foam-etc/

An hour spent there might help you to refine your questions.
Old 20th September 2019
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
Cool, I'll look for mineral wool then.

I do not think that a mattress will be as versatile as a rigid structure. I can't put a mattress on a stand, and cannot put it on the ledge that I have in my room.

On top of this, mattresses are not cheap, and unless I am vastly underestimating the cost of mineral wool, will be as expensive (or more expensive) than the proposed mineral wool frame.

The frames that I am looking for can be found on facebook marketplace for free.

All in all, after hearing what problems your facing (small budget, not allowed to drill into walls/ceiling, not being able do too much yourself - thinking of hiring a carpenter), and the fact that your room is practically a cube (which would require a lot of treatment to get right), I think you will be better off (and happier in the long run) with a good pair of headphones. My 2 cents.

My initial estimate on my studio build (two huge bass traps filled with hemp, four floor-ceiling broadband absorbers) will probably set me back some 500-600 euros (the Hemp costing about half of that). And that's just a start. I already have all the tools I need to construct these things...

Think long and hard if you're really spending your cash on the right thing. A good pair of cans cost 150-300 euro.

/Cheers, Mark

Last edited by Mark Alpine; 20th September 2019 at 07:48 AM.. Reason: added more info...
Old 20th September 2019
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Alpine View Post
All in all, after hearing what problems your facing (small budget, not allowed to drill into walls/ceiling, not being able do too much yourself - thinking of hiring a carpenter), and the fact that your room is practically a cubell
The work of Walker is that dimensions should be more than 5% apart. They are 8% apart on the closest.
Old 20th September 2019
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Alpine View Post
All in all, after hearing what problems your facing (small budget, not allowed to drill into walls/ceiling, not being able do too much yourself - thinking of hiring a carpenter), and the fact that your room is practically a cube (which would require a lot of treatment to get right), I think you will be better off (and happier in the long run) with a good pair of headphones. My 2 cents.

My initial estimate on my studio build (two huge bass traps filled with hemp, four floor-ceiling broadband absorbers) will probably set me back some 500-600 euros (the Hemp costing about half of that). And that's just a start. I already have all the tools I need to construct these things...

Think long and hard if you're really spending your cash on the right thing. A good pair of cans cost 150-300 euro.
Actually, I think you'll find that most mix engineers, producers, acousticians, and musicians would not agree with that: you cannot mix on headphones the same way you can mix on speakers, because of psycho-acoustics. With headphones, each ear hears only one speaker, 100% direct sound, and hears nothing from the other speaker, or the low-level ambiance of the room. So there is no ability to localize sound the same way that people localize it in normal rooms. In other words, with headphones the music sound like it is all inside your head, between your ears: the sound stage only extends from ear to ear, since that's the full width of the stereo image. With speakers, the sound is "around" you: your left ear hears some of the sound from the right speaker, and vice versa, so your brain has a sensation of the sound being outside your head, not inside it: the stereo image and sound stage cover the full width of the distance between the speakers and possibly more too, so there is a sense of detail, direction, and "air" that it is physically impossible to experience on headphones.

OK, let me temper that with a little more explanation to clarify, before the purists climb in and say "that's wrong! yu can make it sound bigger!". With headphones, yes, it is possible to SIMULATE an experience where the sound seems to be coming from outside your head, by carefully manipulating the signals sent to each ear, to add the subtle variations in frequency, phase, lelve, and timing that your brain uses to determine space.... but you can't mix like that! That's the point I'm making: your ears must hear the actual, real direct sound from the speakers, plus a little of the room ambience, to provide the pleasant, neutral, natural, clean, uncolored sound that you need to mix and master. You can fake some of the missing information to fool your brain electronically, but if you try to mix like that, you will fail and your mixes will not translate, because anyone listening on typical speakers in a typical acoustic space (house, car, office, shop, club, church, etc.) would say that it just sounds weird...

If it was possible to mix wonderfully on cans, I think the major studios, producers, mix engineers, musicians, mastering engineers, song writers, and others would have figured it out by now, and they would not bother spending big money making carefully designed and tuned control rooms.

- Stuart -
Old 20th September 2019
  #38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
you cannot mix on headphones the same way you can mix on speakers, because of psycho-acoustics.
100 % agree. IMO if the drums are too loud, it was probably mixed on headphones.
Old 20th September 2019
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
Actually, I think you'll find that most mix engineers, producers, acousticians, and musicians would not agree with that: you cannot mix on headphones the same way you can mix on speakers, because of psycho-acoustics. With headphones, each ear hears only one speaker, 100% direct sound, and hears nothing from the other speaker, or the low-level ambiance of the room. So there is no ability to localize sound the same way that people localize it in normal rooms. In other words, with headphones the music sound like it is all inside your head, between your ears: the sound stage only extends from ear to ear, since that's the full width of the stereo image. With speakers, the sound is "around" you: your left ear hears some of the sound from the right speaker, and vice versa, so your brain has a sensation of the sound being outside your head, not inside it: the stereo image and sound stage cover the full width of the distance between the speakers and possibly more too, so there is a sense of detail, direction, and "air" that it is physically impossible to experience on headphones.

OK, let me temper that with a little more explanation to clarify, before the purists climb in and say "that's wrong! yu can make it sound bigger!". With headphones, yes, it is possible to SIMULATE an experience where the sound seems to be coming from outside your head, by carefully manipulating the signals sent to each ear, to add the subtle variations in frequency, phase, lelve, and timing that your brain uses to determine space.... but you can't mix like that! That's the point I'm making: your ears must hear the actual, real direct sound from the speakers, plus a little of the room ambience, to provide the pleasant, neutral, natural, clean, uncolored sound that you need to mix and master. You can fake some of the missing information to fool your brain electronically, but if you try to mix like that, you will fail and your mixes will not translate, because anyone listening on typical speakers in a typical acoustic space (house, car, office, shop, club, church, etc.) would say that it just sounds weird...

If it was possible to mix wonderfully on cans, I think the major studios, producers, mix engineers, musicians, mastering engineers, song writers, and others would have figured it out by now, and they would not bother spending big money making carefully designed and tuned control rooms.

- Stuart -
Stuart,

I completely agree with you on this. However, given the limitations he have, I thought it would be at least fair to ventilate the headphone option.

Thanks, Mark
Old 22nd September 2019
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avare View Post
I do not know what to write. You wrote that the problem was attachment to walls and ceilings. I adfressed that.

You wrote nothing about budget. On this continent people have gatage sales and moving sales. Mattresses are very inexpensive.

Please do not reply to people who are trying to help yoiu with new obstructions.7
Sorry Avare.

I did not mean any offence.

I guess my budget is around 500-600$AUD.

I could definitely try the mattress thing, but I'm not so sure of it as a permanent solution.

Would the mattress have just as efficient acoustic absorbtion properties to the same volume of proposed acoustic panels (storage cubes filled with mineral wool)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Alpine View Post

Think long and hard if you're really spending your cash on the right thing. A good pair of cans cost 150-300 euro.

/Cheers, Mark
I have found the cube storage frames for free on facebook marketplace, and one of my friends who is a carpenter has a bunch of spare mineral wool to give me, so the current cost of this project sits around zero.

Getting a good pair of headphones is definitely on the to do list.
Old 22nd September 2019
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avare View Post
It is too difficult to put a mattress against the wall?
Quote:
Originally Posted by avare View Post
Mattresses are very inexpensive.
Andre, could you explain what you have in mind regarding a mattress? My understanding is that mattresses are made from either closed-cell foam or springs, neither of which are considered serious acoustic treatment products. However, I know you well enough to know that this will not be a mistake on your part, rather it will be my lack of understanding.
Old 23rd September 2019
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starlight View Post
Andre, could you explain what you have in mind regarding a mattress? My understanding is that mattresses are made from either closed-cell foam or springs, neither of which are considered serious acoustic treatment products. However, I know you well enough to know that this will not be a mistake on your part, rather it will be my lack of understanding.
You almost identified it. The op is claiming minimal budget. They can be obtained down to free. They are not prefered for the reasons you wrote.
Old 23rd September 2019
  #43
The depth/thickness of proper treatment or even vaguely effective treatment is so deep that for a small room you'd have no useable space left.

Headphones is the answer.

Use them for EQ and then you can use your monitors for balances.
Old 23rd September 2019
  #44
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Quote:
The depth/thickness of proper treatment or even vaguely effective treatment is so deep that for a small room you'd have no useable space left.
It is possible to get pretty good results from as little as 6" or 8" of suitable porous insulation, down to 100 Hz or even less. Membrane traps can go a lot lower than that, in roughly the same thickness. Ditto for various types of Helmholtz resonator. Treatment doesn't have to be hugely deep to produce good results. It just needs to be the right type, placed in the right location.


- Stuart -
Old 23rd September 2019
  #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
It is possible to get pretty good results from as little as 6" or 8" of suitable porous insulation, down to 100 Hz or even less. Membrane traps can go a lot lower than that, in roughly the same thickness. Ditto for various types of Helmholtz resonator. Treatment doesn't have to be hugely deep to produce good results. It just needs to be the right type, placed in the right location.


- Stuart -
I'm going to get two of these https://www.bunnings.com.au/flexi-st...white_p2583386

There's a bunch of them on marketplace for less than $15 each.

I'm going to fill them with mineral wool and hopefully after a bit of fiddling with placement these can get me a semi-decent result.

Thanks so much for all of your help everyone, I came to the right place.

I'll let you know how I go
Old 23rd September 2019
  #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
I'm going to get two of these https://www.bunnings.com.au/flexi-st...white_p2583386

There's a bunch of them on marketplace for less than $15 each.

I'm going to fill them with mineral wool and hopefully after a bit of fiddling with placement these can get me a semi-decent result.

Thanks so much for all of your help everyone, I came to the right place.

I'll let you know how I go
Those will probably work OK, but there's another type of bass trap that you might want to consider, which is even easier to build: It's called the "Superchunk", and if you search the forum I'm sure you'll find a few examples. Basically, you cut up ordinary panels of semi-rigid insulation (such as OC-703, or Rockboard 40) into large triangles, that you then stack in the corners of the room, floor to ceiling. And that's it! You could then put some type of fabric over the front to hide the insulation, maybe on a light frame, but acoustically all you need is the insulation. Since the device is triangular, it doesn't stick out into the room as far as your shelf modules would. It extends along the walls a bit more, yes, but it still takes up less space in a small room. The usual recommendation is to have the sides of the triangle extending at least 24" along the walls (+/-60 cm), and more if you can manage it. This type of bass trap has a good effect down to rather low frequencies.

I have added a couple of photos below that show, firstly, the general idea, and in the second one, how you can do them both vertically and horizontally, using a simple wood frame to hold them in place ... assuming you are able to attach that to the wall in some way, for the horizontal one - probably not an option in your case, but you could do the vertical ones easily, with a frame that just stands up on the floor.


- Stuart -
Attached Thumbnails
Another 'cuboid room' thread-superchunks-03-enh.jpg   Another 'cuboid room' thread-rdmo-vertical-superchunk-frame-02.jpg  
Old 23rd September 2019
  #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
Those will probably work OK, but there's another type of bass trap that you might want to consider, which is even easier to build: It's called the "Superchunk", and if you search the forum I'm sure you'll find a few examples. Basically, you cut up ordinary panels of semi-rigid insulation (such as OC-703, or Rockboard 40) into large triangles, that you then stack in the corners of the room, floor to ceiling. And that's it! You could then put some type of fabric over the front to hide the insulation, maybe on a light frame, but acoustically all you need is the insulation. Since the device is triangular, it doesn't stick out into the room as far as your shelf modules would. It extends along the walls a bit more, yes, but it still takes up less space in a small room. The usual recommendation is to have the sides of the triangle extending at least 24" along the walls (+/-60 cm), and more if you can manage it. This type of bass trap has a good effect down to rather low frequencies.

I have added a couple of photos below that show, firstly, the general idea, and in the second one, how you can do them both vertically and horizontally, using a simple wood frame to hold them in place ... assuming you are able to attach that to the wall in some way, for the horizontal one - probably not an option in your case, but you could do the vertical ones easily, with a frame that just stands up on the floor.


- Stuart -
OC703 has a GFR of 16000 (or even 27000 according to NASA). Isn't that far too high for these kind of traps? Plan to build some myself (that's why I ask) and I'm looking at Hemp insulation that's specified at 3000 rayls/m instead. Isn't the OC703 more suitable for 4-6" panels having an air gap behind them?

Thanks!
Old 23rd September 2019
  #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Alpine View Post
OC703 has a GFR of 16000 (or even 27000 according to NASA). Isn't that far too high for these kind of traps? Plan to build some myself (that's why I ask) and I'm looking at Hemp insulation that's specified at 3000 rayls/m instead. Isn't the OC703 more suitable for 4-6" panels having an air gap behind them?
The latest official info from Owens Corning themselves, from just a couple of weeks ago, is that the GFR of 703 is 18,000 MKS rayls. Andre managed to get that out of them, after several tries and being rather persistent with them, so that's the official correct number.

Yes, you could go with lower if you wanted too, and that would be fine, but OC703 does fine in superchunks. Another option would be to make your triangles a little smaller, then put a thick face of something with a lower GFR number, (maybe your hemp, or "pink fluffy", or something similar) across the entire front of the trap, for slightly improve low end response.

If you look closely, you can see that the vertical one in the second image does have an air gap behind it: That's mostly because that wall is angled backwards (not by my design! That's the room they wanted me to fix, with no possibility of changing the shape), but there is also an effect on the absorption, and the final results are really good. Of course, the superchunks are just a small part of the overall treatment in that room, but they do their job quite well.

There's many ways of building a superchunk! They are so deep that most common insulation types will work, as long as they are not too dense. I wouldn't go too much higher than OC-703, though.


- Stuart -
Old 24th September 2019
  #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
Those will probably work OK, but there's another type of bass trap that you might want to consider, which is even easier to build: It's called the "Superchunk", and if you search the forum I'm sure you'll find a few examples. Basically, you cut up ordinary panels of semi-rigid insulation (such as OC-703, or Rockboard 40) into large triangles, that you then stack in the corners of the room, floor to ceiling. And that's it! You could then put some type of fabric over the front to hide the insulation, maybe on a light frame, but acoustically all you need is the insulation. Since the device is triangular, it doesn't stick out into the room as far as your shelf modules would. It extends along the walls a bit more, yes, but it still takes up less space in a small room. The usual recommendation is to have the sides of the triangle extending at least 24" along the walls (+/-60 cm), and more if you can manage it. This type of bass trap has a good effect down to rather low frequencies.

I have added a couple of photos below that show, firstly, the general idea, and in the second one, how you can do them both vertically and horizontally, using a simple wood frame to hold them in place ... assuming you are able to attach that to the wall in some way, for the horizontal one - probably not an option in your case, but you could do the vertical ones easily, with a frame that just stands up on the floor.

- Stuart -
Hi Stuart

When you say that it's recommended to have the triangle extending to 60 cm along the wall, do you mean that the edge of the triangles should be 60cm along the wall to the corner of the room?

I was initially thinking that the storage units would work well for me, because I could move them to different positions to experiment with what sounds good, but this looks like quite a good idea for simply filling the corners of the room, top to bottom.

I would only be able to do this with 2 of the corners of my room (corners on wall that my monitors are facing)

Thanks for the tip, I'll look into it

EDIT: Also, how important is it to close off the frame with fabric at every point?

I've heard that mineral wool/fiberglass insulation can be irritating to the skin, but those pictures look like the insulation is just hanging freely with little worry.
Old 24th September 2019
  #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
I've heard that mineral wool/fiberglass insulation can be irritating to the skin, but those pictures look like the insulation is just hanging freely with little worry.
These are myths with a faint n'a sos on fact
If you move the material it may release fibers.
Old 24th September 2019
  #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
When you say that it's recommended to have the triangle extending to 60 cm along the wall, do you mean that the edge of the triangles should be 60cm along the wall to the corner of the room?

EDIT: Also, how important is it to close off the frame with fabric at every point?
If it helps to see it, this how I made my corner traps, just one of many ways: 60cm sides and a 85cm hypotenuse and completely filled with triangles of insulation. I made mine 1/3 of the height of my room so that I could easily stack them and move them. The front is covered with hessian/burlap and, because I didn't have a big budget, the back with plasterer's mesh. Gardening mesh is another cheap alternative.

The slightly open backs have caused no problem, really because in a studio there is not a lot of air movement as avare mentions - which could be when making the traps or by having them subject to strong wind coming through an open window or door. While making the traps, sure, a mask is recommended.
Attached Thumbnails
Another 'cuboid room' thread-2378pasca.jpg   Another 'cuboid room' thread-2395hook.jpg   Another 'cuboid room' thread-2453corners.jpg  
Old 24th September 2019
  #52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
It is possible to get pretty good results from as little as 6" or 8" of suitable porous insulation, down to 100 Hz or even less. Membrane traps can go a lot lower than that, in roughly the same thickness. Ditto for various types of Helmholtz resonator. Treatment doesn't have to be hugely deep to produce good results. It just needs to be the right type, placed in the right location.


- Stuart -
It's a question of standards.

Plus, 8 inches, plus the frame for the installation gets close to a foot deep, which means taking almost 2 feet off of the dimensions of the room.

In your other post you've got something that's 24 inches, meaning 4 feet off of the dimensions of the room. And that's only your corner traps.


For mixing in a bedroom you're going to have better results with headphones and extremely close near fields than an treatment that's actually practical.
Old 24th September 2019
  #53
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Quote:
Plus, 8 inches, plus the frame for the installation gets close to a foot deep, which means taking almost 2 feet off of the dimensions of the room.
I don't understand why someone would need to add 50% to the depth of a panel to install it. When I build 8" thick panels, they are 8" thick, or maybe 8 1/2 at most.

Quote:
In your other post you've got something that's 24 inches, meaning 4 feet off of the dimensions of the room. And that's only your corner traps.
I'm not sure which post you are referring to: maybe you could provide a link? If you are referring to what I said about superchunks, then yes, they do run 24" (or more) out from the corners, but no, they do not take off 24" from the room dimensions. If you look at the photos I posted, you should be able to figure out why that is. The room remains the exact same length and width, with no change the the overall dimensions. It's only the corners of the room that are filled, in diagonal, and even then it is less than 24" at the deepest point (directly in the corner). Since the corners of a room are very often empty anyway, then installing Superchunks doesn't take up much space at all. And since all room modes always terminate in corners, placing suitable treatment in the corners gets you maximum effectiveness in minimum space, since it can deal with multiple modes at once, in multiple directions: Each corner can deal with all axials in two of the three planes, all tangentials that involve those two surfaces, and all obliques. That's why superchunks are so popular: very simple to build, low-cost, does not take up much space, very effective, and guaranteed to damp the highest possible number of modes in the least possible space.

Regarding trying to mix on headphones: we already went over that and why it doesn't work very well, a few posts back: Another 'cuboid room' thread

Personally, I would always choose mixing on good speakers in a reasonably decent room, over attempting to do it on headphones, if I was trying to turn out the best mix possible that also translates well.


- Stuart -
Old 24th September 2019
  #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
Hi Stuart

When you say that it's recommended to have the triangle extending to 60 cm along the wall, do you mean that the edge of the triangles should be 60cm along the wall to the corner of the room?
Exactly. Start in the corner and measure 60cm out along each wall: that's the triangle. It works well if you take a full panel of OC-703, for example, which measures 4' x 8' (48" x 96"). You can lay out 24" triangles on that very simply, and end up without any waste at all.


Quote:
I was initially thinking that the storage units would work well for me, because I could move them to different positions to experiment with what sounds good, but this looks like quite a good idea for simply filling the corners of the room, top to bottom.
There's no need to experiment here: You are needing bass traps to deal with your modal issues. All modes start and end in room corners, so placing such a trap in the corner ensures that it is doing the most it possibly can. If you put it in the front left corner, it will have an effect on all width-wise axial modes (ones that run across the room between the side walls), and all lengthwise modes (ones that along the room from front to back), as well as all tangential modes that happen to involve those two walls, and all oblique modes (since obliques involve all six boundary surfaces). So placing a superchunk in a corner will always be better than moving it out of the corner.

Quote:
I would only be able to do this with 2 of the corners of my room (corners on wall that my monitors are facing)
That's great! The back wall (the one behind your head when you are seated at the mix position, mixing) is always the one that causes the most serious issues, in any small room, so treating that one will get you some good results. Probably not enough, though, but certainly a good start. If you could do something like Starlight shows, with the additional module that runs across the top of that same wall, that would get you another improvement, since it would then be having an effect on the vertical modes too.

Quote:
EDIT: Also, how important is it to close off the frame with fabric at every point?
To look good aesthetically, yes that helps! Keeping the fabric nice and neat, stretched even across the frame, makes it look better. More professional. But there's no acoustic difference. And as Andre said, it's a bit of a myth that fibers are a problem once the device is installed.

Quote:
I've heard that mineral wool/fiberglass insulation can be irritating to the skin, but those pictures look like the insulation is just hanging freely with little worry.
Wear gloves and a mask when you actually build them, yes. Also wear long pants and a long-sleeve shirt, as it's not fun to work with the insulation. But once it is completed and in place, there should be no issues.... unless you start poking it or moving it around!

- Stuart -
Old 24th September 2019
  #55
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
Those will probably work OK, but there's another type of bass trap that you might want to consider, which is even easier to build: It's called the "Superchunk", and if you search the forum I'm sure you'll find a few examples. Basically, you cut up ordinary panels of semi-rigid insulation (such as OC-703, or Rockboard 40) into large triangles, that you then stack in the corners of the room, floor to ceiling. And that's it! You could then put some type of fabric over the front to hide the insulation, maybe on a light frame, but acoustically all you need is the insulation. Since the device is triangular, it doesn't stick out into the room as far as your shelf modules would. It extends along the walls a bit more, yes, but it still takes up less space in a small room. The usual recommendation is to have the sides of the triangle extending at least 24" along the walls (+/-60 cm), and more if you can manage it. This type of bass trap has a good effect down to rather low frequencies.

I have added a couple of photos below that show, firstly, the general idea, and in the second one, how you can do them both vertically and horizontally, using a simple wood frame to hold them in place ... assuming you are able to attach that to the wall in some way, for the horizontal one - probably not an option in your case, but you could do the vertical ones easily, with a frame that just stands up on the floor.


- Stuart -
Is rockboard the same as comfortboard? We have the comfortboard 80 available in Canada and Safe and Sound. Would the comfortboard 80 work just as well?
Old 25th September 2019
  #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Caffrey View Post
It's a question of standards.

Plus, 8 inches, plus the frame for the installation gets close to a foot deep, which means taking almost 2 feet off of the dimensions of the room.

In your other post you've got something that's 24 inches, meaning 4 feet off of the dimensions of the room. And that's only your corner traps.


For mixing in a bedroom you're going to have better results with headphones and extremely close near fields than an treatment that's actually practical.
I'm not really bothered by taking a foot off of the room dimensions.

I know I will never get this room to sound perfect, I just want it to sound tolerable.

I want to be able to play music on the speakers just for relaxation purposes. It's difficult to get inspired when I hate the sound of my speakers, and rarely play music as a result.

I'm definitely going to invest in a pair of studio headphones regardless of the outcome of my acoustic treatment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post

That's great! The back wall (the one behind your head when you are seated at the mix position, mixing) is always the one that causes the most serious issues, in any small room, so treating that one will get you some good results. Probably not enough, though, but certainly a good start. If you could do something like Starlight shows, with the additional module that runs across the top of that same wall, that would get you another improvement, since it would then be having an effect on the vertical modes too.

- Stuart -
I'd love to get a module which runs along the top wall, but I don't think that is doable within my rental property :( Let me know if you have any ideas regarding this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post


To look good aesthetically, yes that helps! Keeping the fabric nice and neat, stretched even across the frame, makes it look better. More professional. But there's no acoustic difference. And as Andre said, it's a bit of a myth that fibers are a problem once the device is installed.

Wear gloves and a mask when you actually build them, yes. Also wear long pants and a long-sleeve shirt, as it's not fun to work with the insulation. But once it is completed and in place, there should be no issues.... unless you start poking it or moving it around!

- Stuart -
Since I'm in my bedroom, and these superchunks will be right next to my bed, I think I'll cover them just to be absolutely sure. They may get nudged or bumped occasionally


I'm going to start building the frames tonight at work out of spare 2x4's I'll keep you updated with the results.

Thank you so much.
Old 25th September 2019
  #57
Here for the gear
 

Hi guys


I've cut out all of the 2x4's to make 2 of these superchunks!

I just about finished the frame for the first one when I ran out of screws :(

I've gone past the hardware store and bought more, so will have 2 of these bad boys finished by tomorrow.

The eventual plan is to build 6 of them, which I will hopefully have done by next week, I've made each superchunk 1/3 the height of my room, so 6 of them will completely cover 2 vertical corners (Thanks starlight for that idea)

How does it look so far? I noticed that the wood I'm using seems to be much larger and sturdier than the ones seen in earlier picture examples. I presume this makes little to no difference.
Attached Images
Another 'cuboid room' thread-image.png 
Old 25th September 2019
  #58
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
Hi guys


I've cut out all of the 2x4's to make 2 of these superchunks!

I just about finished the frame for the first one when I ran out of screws :(

I've gone past the hardware store and bought more, so will have 2 of these bad boys finished by tomorrow.

The eventual plan is to build 6 of them, which I will hopefully have done by next week, I've made each Superchunk 1/3 the height of my room, so 6 of them will completely cover 2 vertical corners (Thanks starlight for that idea)

How does it look so far? I noticed that the wood I'm using seems to be much larger and sturdier than the ones seen in earlier picture examples. I presume this makes little to no difference.
Looks great so far! I'm jealous you have the space to make frames. Being in the city makes it difficult for me and I've been sitting around pondering what to do for weeks not since moving into my new place.

Personally, I would have split the 2x4's in half assuming you have the tools to allow you to do this. I'm guessing you do since it sounds like you work in some sort of construction field. You probably could have made two frames by doing this since the super chunks probably don't require a very stiff frame to be supported.

You are miles ahead of where I am though and looks like this will work out nicely for you!
Old 25th September 2019
  #59
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by recaro19 View Post
Looks great so far! I'm jealous you have the space to make frames. Being in the city makes it difficult for me and I've been sitting around pondering what to do for weeks not since moving into my new place.

Personally, I would have split the 2x4's in half assuming you have the tools to allow you to do this. I'm guessing you do since it sounds like you work in some sort of construction field. You probably could have made two frames by doing this since the super chunks probably don't require a very stiff frame to be supported.

You are miles ahead of where I am though and looks like this will work out nicely for you!
I live in the city too! Northern suburbs of Melbourne.

I actually work in a warehouse that sells spill kits and PPE equipment. We have a random assortment of tools here for odd jobs, and I have been using the 2x4's from old broken pallets.

I don't really have the means to cut the 2x4's in half. I've been doing all of the cutting with a circular saw. In order to cut something, I need it to be suspended in the air.

I'm going to see how heavy the finished product is once I've inserted the mineral wool. as long as it doesn't weigh too much I think I'll just continue as I have done.
Old 26th September 2019
  #60
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trusko View Post
I actually work in a warehouse that sells spill kits and PPE equipment. We have a random assortment of tools here for odd jobs, and I have been using the 2x4's from old broken pallets.

I don't really have the means to cut the 2x4's in half. I've been doing all of the cutting with a circular saw.
Ahhh.....makes sense. Yeah splitting wood with a circular saw isn't so safe...lol

I thought you might have worked in framing or some sort of pre-fab place which had a table saw since you said you have access to extra 2x4's.

Eitherway, good job. Can't wait to figure out my situation.
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