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Treating Mid and High frequencies in my room (audio sample included)
Old 6th September 2019
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Treating Mid and High frequencies in my room (audio sample included)

Hello to the gearslutz audio community,

I have already treated the low frequencies in my room using super chunk bass traps.
I still have problems while recording vocals when it comes to mid and high frequencies.

I'm not quite sure if my problem is flutter echo or slap back echo or a simple reverberation. For this reason, I have included an audio file so that could hear what the nasty echo sounds like and how I could tackle the problem efficiently.

It would be great if you guys could help me.

Thanks in advance,

Tom
Attached Files

Reverberation.mp3 (695.9 KB, 191 views)

Old 6th September 2019
  #2
Gear Addict
 

Flutter.
It's easy to get rid of flutter but that is not a guarantee all the flaws of the room are taken care of.
The room seems not very large, you have drawings/pictures?
Old 6th September 2019
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bert stoltenborg View Post
Flutter.
It's easy to get rid of flutter but that is not a guarantee all the flaws of the room are taken care of.
The room seems not very large, you have drawings/pictures?
Thanks, for the reply. Unfortunately I don't have photos right now but these are the room dimensions.

4.35 metres length
4.5 metres width
3.3 metres height

How can I fix the flutter issues for now?

(Bass issues are already fixed)
Old 6th September 2019
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Flutter is sound bouncing between two or more parallel boundaries.
A thin layer of absorption or diffusion or splaying the walls 12 degrees takes care about it.
Old 6th September 2019
  #5
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bert stoltenborg View Post
Flutter is sound bouncing between two or more parallel boundaries.
A thin layer of absorption or diffusion or splaying the walls 12 degrees takes care about it.
What kind of absorption material is recommended?
What thickness do you define as thin? (In inches)
Should I cover the whole surface area of the walls?
What about floor and ceiling?
Old 7th September 2019
  #6
Lives for gear
 
akebrake's Avatar
 

Testing testing

Quote:
Originally Posted by producerxtr View Post
What kind of absorption material is recommended?
Yes, to me it definitely sounds like flutter.
(Fast, periodic repetitions of reflections with little damping which gives a "metallic tube" like tone).

A couple of 4" mineral wool/ polyester panels on the "hot spots"
But you need to find those spots...

Quote:
What about floor and ceiling?
A room have at least 6 boundaries. Some treatment on 5 of these are usually needed to bring "room sound" down to an acceptable degree.

Superchunks in a couple of corners will leave large areas of walls reflective.

Try a couple of rugs on the floor (or panels of mineral wool) to find out if it helps.

A couple of Gobos (movable soft/hard screens) is also convenient for having at hand to move around in different directions until the flutter disappears.
e.g. Behind the singer

One can try leaning a plywood panel against a wall to remove paralellism.

Without a sketch or photo and a more detailed description of your room we can only guess how to cure your acoustical problems.
Why don't you upload a REW mdat?

My 0.02

BTW This phenomena can also show up in fairly well-treated rooms if one dimension have less absorption than the others.
Old 7th September 2019
  #7
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Starlight's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by akebrake View Post
This phenomena ...
Sorry: this phenomenon; these or those phenomena.

IGMC
Old 7th September 2019
  #8
Gear Addict
 

Not trying to be a smart ass, but you don't need 4" of absorption to get rid of flutter. As Ake says a rug is already sufficient.
On the other hand, if you're at it anyways 4" will never hurt.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
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akebrake's Avatar
 

Grammar

Quote:
Originally Posted by Starlight View Post
Sorry: this phenomenon; these or those phenomena.

IGMC
Thanks for pointing that out! I’ve been thinking about why I missed that.
Maybe because in swedish we have the same word ”fenomen” for singular and plural.

Cheers


PS You made me recall a story about grammar.(source unknown to me)
Enjoy!
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Treating Mid and High frequencies in my room (audio sample included)-professor-tbe-bar.jpg  
Old 4 weeks ago
  #10
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