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Doubt regarding my room acoustics and placement of the workdesk
Old 5th June 2019
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Doubt regarding my room acoustics and placement of the workdesk

Hello, community

This is my very first post here. I ve been saving some money for a while and now I am ready to invest, but before..I am not sure about my room acoustics and how studio-friendly it is. The story goes like this. Me and my friend (we share the same apartment) live in an old-ish building and we share some doors between our rooms. And besides that, our rooms dont have uPVC windows. They are simple glass, easy-to-break like. Even with them closed, we hear almost everything from outside. Here is a sketch I did of how our rooms look like and their measurements.



So, this is my room and its wierdly shaped corners.



My questions are the following. Which room is more suited for our purposes? Where should the workdesk be? Regarding acoustic treatment, I am aware of the basics, but how would you advise me to do with these corners? Both rooms are designed like that. And if you know some related-topics that would help me, it would mean a lot. I know what ask is a lot, but I ll be very grateful to whomever replies and helps me.
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Doubt regarding my room acoustics and placement of the workdesk-room-acoustics.jpg  
Old 5th June 2019
  #2
that stuff on the wall is artex, if it was applied before the late 90s then it may have asbestos in it, be careful and don't drill into it without having it tested first.
Old 5th June 2019
  #3
Lives for gear
Congratulations on your post. Very good basic information and diagrams.
I am not going to offer treatment advice, since this is more an area of interest to me and not an area of great expertise.
One thing... it looks like you have a fire sprinkler system in at least one of the rooms. If that is what you have, make sure that your acoustic treatment does not cover any sensors or interfere with the sprinklers’ ability to cover the room.
Old 5th June 2019
  #4
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
Congratulations on your post. Very good basic information and diagrams.
I am not going to offer treatment advice, since this is more an area of interest to me and not an area of great expertise.
One thing... it looks like you have a fire sprinkler system in at least one of the rooms. If that is what you have, make sure that your acoustic treatment does not cover any sensors or interfere with the sprinklers’ ability to cover the room.
Feel free to advise me, please. At this point any information is good. I ll sort out all the info later. The fire sprinkler is broker. And which room do you think will do me good?
Old 5th June 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
Here is my advice because you asked for it, but don’t regard it as being wise, because it isn’t. It’s from some practical experience and a lot of reading. So...

A larger room is usually a better place to start. Also, the dimensions of your larger room are, I think, slightly less square, which is a good thing.
I think the best mix position would be facing the windows, so the windows are not in a first reflection area to one side or behind you. You should get your speakers very close to the wall, which should help in getting your ears away from the center of any two boundaries. It is also best to try to get the level of your ears and the speakers above or below the center of the height dimension, as much as is practical.
The corners and their strange geometry don’t prevent you from placing tall, thick fiber traps diagonally across the wall corners. If you can’t trap all the way to the top because the geometry gets too busy up there, your traps can stop wherever that becomes a problem. The corners with doors can be skipped, or you can use freestanding traps that can be placed or removed as necessary.

Now the possibly bad news... The windows, doors, floors and ceilings are going to leak sound in both directions. I assume that you can’t do any “construction” solutions to give you structural isolation (room within a room). If you have major street noise, noisy neighbors, or cranky neighbors who will object to any of your noise leaking into their space, you really can’t do anything affordable that will allow you to listen at a reasonable level without them also listening to something they don’t want to hear.
Tight window plugs of thick fiber can knock down the level of window leakage somewhat, but don’t assume that you are going to be able to record a quiet acoustic guitar if there are horns honking or diesel trucks rumbling by outside. You are going to have to be creative about learning what times allow or forbid you to do certain studio functions.
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