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Question About Speakers, Balancing, and LF/HF Trim Switches Studio Monitors
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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M.Retra's Avatar
Question About Speakers, Balancing, and LF/HF Trim Switches

On the rear panels of many studio monitors, including my LSR308's, there are pots or switches related to LF and HF trims. The LSR308 has two switches, one for LF trim and the other for HF trim. The settings are -2dB <- 0 -> +2dB. A volume knob also exists.

When testing the room with REW, I noticed--and it was also pointed out in another post of mine--that the right speaker was slightly louder than the left speaker. Easy enough, just adjust the right speaker's volume knob down about 2 clicks. Fixed it. I assume that the the correct way of going about it, right?

Next, I noticed that the low-frequency REW/room response of from left speaker was slightly less than the right speaker. Switching the LF trim switch up from the 0 position to the +2dB position seemed to balance the two speakers.

And finally, I noticed that both speakers' high-frequency responses were less than ideally flat. I believe the broadband absorption panels are soaking up some of the highs. Not too bad though. So switching the HF trim switch up from the 0 position to the +2dB position on both speakers seemed to create a more flat frequency response per REW tests.

So between both speakers, the trims and volume settings are not the same. Is this OK or what is typically done with said controls?

I am also using Sonarworks to further balance the system.

Thanks for any help.
Old 1 week ago
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M.Retra's Avatar
Bump and refresh for a little confirmation. Thanks.
Old 1 week ago
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boggy's Avatar
Hi, can you share your REW measurement data with us?
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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If you are using the controls with REW to balance the response of the two speakers, you are doing what I do. Whether it is a common or best use of the controls, I can’t answer, but it would seem to be correct.
Old 1 week ago
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If you are getting better balanced results like that, in both frequency response in general and also in left/right symmetry, the I don't see anything at all wrong with that! That's what tuning is all about.

- Stuart -
Old 1 week ago
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Just make sure to gate the impulse so you are only looking at the direct sound component when comparing the level between L & R.
Old 1 week ago
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Old 6 days ago
  #8
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M.Retra's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
If you are using the controls with REW to balance the response of the two speakers, you are doing what I do. Whether it is a common or best use of the controls, I can’t answer, but it would seem to be correct.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
If you are getting better balanced results like that, in both frequency response in general and also in left/right symmetry, the I don't see anything at all wrong with that! That's what tuning is all about.
Yes, REW is being used. I mean, what the hell else are the speaker trim switches/pots used for if not for fine-tune-adjusting of the sound, right? I'm with you both on this. Simple answers, and it seems that it shouldn't matter if one speaker's fine-tuning is different than the other. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
Just make sure to gate the impulse so you are only looking at the direct sound component when comparing the level between L & R.
I assume REW is doing this...
Old 6 days ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Simple answers, and it seems that it shouldn't matter if one speaker's fine-tuning is different than the other.
Yup. What you are doing is compensating for issues some other place, in order to get balance at the mix position. Very valid.

Quote:
I assume REW is doing this...
Only if you ask it to! By default, the gating in REW is set very long. You can set it shorter if you think you need to, but to be aware that doing so limits the low frequency resolution. The shorter you make the window, the less low end resolution you get. There's no free lunch!

- Stuart -
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