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What would be your quickest cost effective solution in this noise situation? Spatial Processor Plugins
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

What would be your quickest cost effective solution in this noise situation?

What if you would have an old factory-like building and you're on the 2nd level. Between first and 2nd level there is quite a thick concrete floor. On top of the concrete you put a laminate floor.

Obviously the concrete floor is a good solid underground but still sound leaks to the room below.

I have don't have the money and time to completely renovate the room and build a floating floor. At best i can temporary remove the laminate and put something between the concrete floor and the laminate. Preferably not a few inches thick as my ceiling is quite low already and the room quite small.

I realize this is far from an ideal situation but for now i have to work with the little money and space i have available. Any tips how to reduce any amount of db would be great! Anything is better than it is now haha!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
I have don't have the money and time to completely renovate the room and build a floating floor. At best i can temporary remove the laminate and put something between the concrete floor and the laminate. Preferably not a few inches thick as my ceiling is quite low already and the room quite small.
Unfortunately, there is no such thing as a quick, easy, cheap way of isolating a studio floor on the upper levels of a building.

The only way to isolate anything, is with mass and decoupling. In other words, you need a second floor of some type above your existing floor, and some way of disconnecting it mechanically from that exiting floor. In order to do that, the "second floor" needs to be massive, in the sense of very, very heavy: hundreds of kilograms per square meter (dozens of PSF, if you prefer imperial). The only practical way to do that, is with a concrete slab. And the only practical way to mechanically isolate such a slab from the existing floor, is with springs of some type: they might be steel springs, or rubber springs, or a combination of steel and rubber.

See if you can Google a document from the Canadian National Research Council, with the reference number IRC-IR-802. The actual title is: "Impact Sound Measurements on Floors Covered with Small Patches of Resilient Materials or Floating Assemblies" (yep, they really did give it that mouthful as a name!). They tested many different types of floors, using materials such as cork, rubber mats, carpet underlay, sponge, fiber glass, etc., and the results are very disappointing: with most of them, the final isolation was WORSE than nothing at all, and even with the best ones, the improvement was only marginal - as in not even audible.

The same organization put out another report, reference number IR-811, with the even more convoluted title: "Detailed Report for Consortium on Fire Resistance and Sound Insulation of Floors: Sound Transmission and Impact Insulation Data in 1/3 Octave Bands". They tested hundreds of floor types, and got similar results.

The only solution for getting good isolation on upper floors, is floating your floor properly, in the form of a concrete slab raised on suitably tuned springs.

Some manufacturers try to sell the idea that you can just slap down a bunch of rubber pucks, jam a few 2x4s on top, then cover that with plywood, and get an amazingly excellent isolated floor, good for any studio... except that they are lying, of course. That would be impossible: the laws of physics don't allow that. Even if it did work, just by standing (or not standing) on the floor you would change the isolation properties. Each time you moved around the room, that would change the way it isolates.... So don't be fooled by marketing hype. The ONLY way to float a studio floor properly, is with a very massive deck, which pretty much always means concrete.

Having said that, if you are just looking to keep SOME of the impact noise inside your room from getting into the buildings structure, then that can be done to a certain extent with a "drum riser" type of floor: Basically, some suitable thick insulation (several inches thick), with three of four layers of thick plywood, OSB, MDF or suchlike screwed and glued on top of that, then your laminate flooring as the final finish. That is NOT a floating floor, but it can help to reduce impact noise transmission, if that is the issue you are worried about. For example, from the drum kit, bass amp, tapping feet, etc.

However, even that is many inches thick, and you did say you can't afford to lose any ceiling height, so it seems to be you are out of luck here: You'll just have to live with the poor isolation.

Sorry. I wish I had better news for you, but that's the plain, down-to-earth honest truth. There are no magical products nor magical construction techniques that can isolate a studio floor in the way you want: low mass, low height, high isolation.

- Stuart -

Last edited by Soundman2020; 4 weeks ago at 05:42 PM..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #3
Gear Head
 

Hi Stuart, thanks for the interesting and dissapointing answer. But knowing a little bit about isolation this was kinda the answer i was expecting.
Guess i'm just gonna accept it as it is and hopefully one day have the means to fix things. Thanks!
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