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New Bedroom Studio (bigger now!)
Old 5 days ago
  #1
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Tholennon's Avatar
 

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New Bedroom Studio (bigger now!)

Hello friends!

I'm here looking for some help with my new "bedroom studio".

I moved to a new house and now I got a bigger room to sleep and produce!


The room its a 19'8 x 11'5 ft rectangle and here is an sketch I made to solve some doubts I'm having on how to configure the "studio":



Well... as you see, the green and blue squares its my rock wool panels, and my bigger concern is about speakers and panels placement.

What could be better:
-place the speakers attached against the wall or keep them away as I designed?
-how about the panels placement I designed?

Do you guys could suggest another configurations that could be better on this room?

Obs.: I'm not looking to get a "professional studio", this is a bedroom, so I just want to improve acoustics to get better recordings and mixes....


THANKS!
Old 3 days ago
  #2
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Ditch the green traps on the bathroom wall and put them above your desk. Measure the room with rew and go from there.
Old 1 day ago
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Foi View Post
Ditch the green traps on the bathroom wall and put them above your desk. Measure the room with rew and go from there.
I dont'g get it
Old 1 day ago
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tholennon View Post
I dont'g get it
Front wall treatment isnt very bennificial. Those traps would serve you better as clouds hanging above your desk.
Old 1 day ago
  #5
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How far from the walls I should place the monitors?
Old 1 day ago
  #6
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Thats what REW is for. It will help you test for optimal position. Typically up against the front wall is a good spot for various reasons, but with that door, and i assume its hollow, you might not get the typical boost in the low end from proximity to a boundary
Old 1 day ago
  #7
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Definitely way too many absorber panels if your walls aren't double-layered sheetrock with mass loaded vinyl or some other mass loading technique between layers. In normal residential construction, the walls already serve as Heilmholtz absorbers in the lower-mids, upper-bass registers. It's very easy to overkill on the absorbtion, especially with a big fluffy mattress (which is in the ideal place actually).

I would definitely take the green absorbers off the bathroom wall and place them on the ceiling in the early/direct reflection zone. Also remove all the other panels except the corner traps, and only place panels if you can't set up the listening position to exclued direct/early reflections; obviously that's where the panels would go if you can't. More panels actually exacerbates standing waves unless you're going full anechoic. Usually what happens is that everything except the standing waves get absorbed, making them anything but ambiguous. You don't want that. The rear wall should have a panel most likely, if the bed isn't doing the trick.

In a room that size and shape, monitor SELECTION, placement and listening position are going to have the greatest effect on what you will hear from the speakers. And bass traps too, but you already have that well covered.

Most importantly, before doing any treatment, you should set up the monitors and mix position. Then you can actually hear what will be a problem and what isn't a factor at all. Sometimes the room modes are actually musical and contribute to the sound, usually in a specific key or keys. They are actually modes by the same definition as when talking about scales/key, and ideally a room mode will match the most common keys/modes that music you're working with is based on.
Old 20 hours ago
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psykostx View Post
Definitely way too many absorber panels if your walls aren't double-layered sheetrock with mass loaded vinyl or some other mass loading technique between layers. In normal residential construction, the walls already serve as Heilmholtz absorbers in the lower-mids, upper-bass registers. It's very easy to overkill on the absorbtion, especially with a big fluffy mattress (which is in the ideal place actually).

I would definitely take the green absorbers off the bathroom wall and place them on the ceiling in the early/direct reflection zone. Also remove all the other panels except the corner traps, and only place panels if you can't set up the listening position to exclued direct/early reflections; obviously that's where the panels would go if you can't. More panels actually exacerbates standing waves unless you're going full anechoic. Usually what happens is that everything except the standing waves get absorbed, making them anything but ambiguous. You don't want that. The rear wall should have a panel most likely, if the bed isn't doing the trick.

In a room that size and shape, monitor SELECTION, placement and listening position are going to have the greatest effect on what you will hear from the speakers. And bass traps too, but you already have that well covered.

Most importantly, before doing any treatment, you should set up the monitors and mix position. Then you can actually hear what will be a problem and what isn't a factor at all. Sometimes the room modes are actually musical and contribute to the sound, usually in a specific key or keys. They are actually modes by the same definition as when talking about scales/key, and ideally a room mode will match the most common keys/modes that music you're working with is based on.
OP, I know it's hard to judge whether or not a random person on an internet forum knows what they are talking about or not.

I vote you completely disregard the above quoted message. I hope regulars here will help you by agreeing with me

P.S. - psykostx - Respectfully, I have no interest in engaging in an argument about your interpretation of reality. Please feel free to label me as ignorant or uninformed, I'll take no offense
Old 20 hours ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Typically 16 panels is a bare minimum approach. A pro room could devote upwards of 60% of room volume to treatment. Bass trapping takes lots of volume or pressure based absorbers to be effective. Typically, wood slats, panels, or something similar will be added later to balance decay times. First, measure your room with REW and determine speaker and listening position
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