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Ugandan Garage Studio Conversion Reverb/Delay Processors (HW)
Old 14th March 2018
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Ugandan Garage Studio Conversion

Hello gear slutz,

I’m out in Uganda working with a studio, the main work in the past being beat making and working with vocalists. We’re working with a pretty low budget and we’re moving into a new place soon, which presents the interesting chance of building our new setup (nearly) from the ground up, with the intention of doing more serious recording projects.

As ever, the garage has been designated as the studio space, considering that the studio operates as an artist residency and space is limited. It’s a really long room, measuring in at 5.96m long, 2.88m wide and 2.56m tall, so this is presenting us with some interesting accoustical challenges, although after sizing it up in the room simulator on REW, things don’t seem ALL that bad. (pics attached)

I’ve been doing research into room modes, speaker boundary interference, general bits of acoustic science, and I’ve come up with a basic plan to work with our limited budget, and the general unavailability of acoustic treatment out here. (We’ve managed to DIY some broadband rockwool (who knows if it was actually rockwool) absorbers before, although frustratingly the stuff is only available in rolls as opposed to blocks, which makes our job 1000% harder) The plan is this, roughly going for a dead end / live end set up:

1. Create a early reflection free zone in the rough mix position, using broadband panels on the walls and ceiling
2. Create a false wall (perhaps in a v-shape to break the rectangular shape of the room) in front of the garage door with plenty of rockwool behind it for bass trapping. (sound isolation is not a priority here)
3. Use soffit mounted and corner panels elsewhere around the room to preserve space and kill bass build up in the most vital areas
4. Place speakers facing away from the garage door, inside the v, so to speak.
perform all necessary tests to find the exact listening/speaker position using REW etc.
5. Adjust ER panels accordingly

There are a few things I’ve been wondering about that I’d like to pick your guys’ brains on:

1. I’m wondering how the garage door will affect the acoustics of the room, and whether it is worth focussing most of our efforts here. My thoughts are that perhaps bass will simply pass through the door and not need to be dampened as much as if it were a solid wall. The door is quite heavy, however. Much heavier than your average, and it opens outward on hinges rather than folding up to the ceiling.
2. I’m also wondering what our best choices are with panel placement, and size. As we are building our own panels, would it be best put all our eggs in one basket, so to speak, and make bigger, thicker panels, or should we try to cover more surface area?
3. Another option is diffusion. I’ve heard that broadband bass traps are less vital if the back wall is more than 10ft from the listening position, which will be the case, and a diffuser could be more complimentary to the sound of the room, especially considering that we want to record in this room as well.

Please let me know if I've missed anything glaringly obvious.

An ideal and (hopefully) realistic attempt at what I might be able to achieve frequency response wise in REW.

Pics of the room...
... with friend for scale
Old 17th March 2018
  #2
Gear Nut
 

What is the garage door made out of? Looks metal. Are you saying that you are thinking about building a wall between the room and the garage door? So the garage door would stay closed and not be used? That could be a good way to minimize the door's affect on room acoustics. IMO, there's virtually no good reason to make the wall angled 'v shaped'. Most folks will tell you that flat is more predictable and should be easier to treat. If you build the wall, it might be best to make it a single leaf using double layer of drywall over wood framing. The garage door becomes the second leaf in a two leaf construction. Leave space for an air gap of 4 or 6 inches between them and some fluffy insulation touching only one wall. So, from the outside...garage door+insulation then air gap then insulation between wall studs+drywall/drywall.

On the inside, measure before placing anything in the room since you have REW. L only, R only speaker and then both. Follow primer stickied at top of forum. Post mdat files for recommendations on treatment.
Old 19th March 2018
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Thanks for your insight! I'll just address each of your questions individually and give you some more

Quote:
Originally Posted by UltramegaOK View Post
What is the garage door made out of? Looks metal.
It's heavy steel or something, yeah.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UltramegaOK View Post
Are you saying that you are thinking about building a wall between the room and the garage door? So the garage door would stay closed and not be used? That could be a good way to minimize the door's affect on room acoustics.
Yes we're fully prepared to lose any use of the garage door and build the wall straight over it. I should also mention that sound isolation to outside through the garage door is not a priority for us - our neighbours are not too close.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UltramegaOK View Post
IMO, there's virtually no good reason to make the wall angled 'v shaped'. Most folks will tell you that flat is more predictable and should be easier to treat.
This is something of a relief, but I was thinking we could make the corner triangles created by the V into some kind of ghetto superchunk bass traps, what do you think about that? My thoughts here were as to whether it's worth focussing our bass traps on a garage door that may just allow bass to escape anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UltramegaOK View Post
If you build the wall, it might be best to make it a single leaf using double layer of drywall over wood framing. The garage door becomes the second leaf in a two leaf construction. Leave space for an air gap of 4 or 6 inches between them and some fluffy insulation touching only one wall. So, from the outside...garage door+insulation then air gap then insulation between wall studs+drywall/drywall.
This sounds good, except for the fact that our garage door has some pretty big holes in it for airflow, and our insulation is very fluffy so I'd be worried about it escaping through the holes, maybe I should just use an extra layer of drywall or staple a tarpaulin or something inside the garage door? I'm very new to DIY so if there's a better idea please let me know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UltramegaOK View Post
On the inside, measure before placing anything in the room since you have REW. L only, R only speaker and then both. Follow primer stickied at top of forum. Post mdat files for recommendations on treatment.
What exactly are mdat files? Also I should do this with this the wall construction done right? As that will effective change all the room modes etc.
Old 19th March 2018
  #4
Gear Nut
 

mdat is the file type from REW. Check out the measuring primer thread at top of forum. It could give some insight.

Measure before (now), during (trying out treatment location) and after. This way you will have some idea of why and how the treatment is working. Knowledge is king. You want to know how the metal door is reflecting, vibrating or passing sound waves, so that you can't decide if and how it needs to be dampened behind the inside wall you will build, too.

I think a flat wall, but then your Superchunk in corners looks like a V or angled wall, but it's really insulation behind a fabric face is typical. Measure first, treat the metal doors, build wall and measure again before treating room. You'll be glad you did.
Old 21st March 2018
  #5
Here for the gear
 

I'm gonna go make some preliminary measurements with the room completely empty very soon. The mic I want to use is an Oktava MK-012 omni, I know this doesn't have a flat frequency response but I'm hoping it will be helpful at least in terms of looking at changes in the response of the room over time. I'm struggling to find a calibration file, or even to work out how mic calibration works - it's just something I've seen people talk about on here.

Would you have any tips on that?
Old 22nd March 2018
  #6
Gear Nut
 

I believe REW will let you capture a plot of the microphone alone. The DanDan measurement sticky or the REW manual might give you a clue. I believe he mentioned the 'how to' for this in a recent thread for another member's room. @DanDan
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