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Speaker placement hight low ratio? Studio Monitors
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
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Thread Starter
Speaker placement hight low ratio?

There are lots of posts about speaker placement I know but they are usually talked about in relation to other things in a room design.

I would like to explore some specifics

1. "If" there is a "theoretical" sweet spot of 38% from front wall for the listening position there must also be a sweet spot ratio for the hight and position of speakers too?

2. I saw an article that said speakers should be at least 120 - 140cm from the floor.

For near-fields this seems already very high. Setting up my room now and have added two thick cushions to my studio chair to get my ears in line with the tweeters at 120 cm, any more and I will literally be standing up.
I really don't want to have to point my speakers down as that sounds like it will open up a new can of pain to deal with.

3. Am I measuring from A) bottom of the speaker B) centre of the driver C) centre of the tweeter?

Yes I know that all rooms are different and I will have to measure and move measure and move but there must be some theory about a starting point?

4. Also there must be an optimal place along the equilateral triangle in relation to the listening position and boundaries?

My ceiling is 7.8 ft high I am 5"10'

Room is pretty small 531cm X 420cm wide 220 high
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
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DanDan's Avatar
Answers

Your questions can all be answered with certainty only in situ using measurement and software.

The 38% thing is based on a hypothetical room, fully hard boundaries, speakers flush mounted. The Math involved should certainly apply on the other axes. Also locating speakers and listener may be kind of reciprocal. e.g. Speaker at 38% Width.....

Speakers have an 'Acoustic Centre'. For Modes and SBIR it is the location of the Woofer that matters. For HF somewhere between the drivers, probably close to the Tweeter. The HF Acoustic Centre should be at seated ear height.
For stereo imaging the Triangle is a good advisor, but note the back of the head would be up to a foot forward of the back Apex.

DD
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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Thread Starter
Slope

Thanks for posting DanDan been a fan of your posts for years now
Wow just been measuring moving my sub and speakers around!

I have my listening position 38% from the front wall just as a starting point.
From this I made a big equilateral triangle and moved the speakers along it while I blasted the room with pink noise. Looking at the test mic input comparison I managed to get quite a decent starting point by also fiddling with the sub level position and cut-off, oh the phase as well was helpful.

THEN I had a go at the speaker hight, still looking at the pink noise I raised them up to 138cm as that seemed where things were "smoothest".

Fuzz measured. Before I moved them up I had a very pronounced roll off slope low to high droop. Now it is really pretty flat indeed compared!

So my conclusion is that moving the hight of your speakers has a dramatic affect as the trend up or down across the entire spectrum. Like a filter? Well at least in my room.

Funny that these acoustics threads are very light on speaker hight stuff as this has had a most dramatic affect on my response. A good starting point anyway.

Anybody else nearly at standing while they mix. Quite like it!

Coming soon: How I fixed my 30dB 150Hz null

Last edited by Carl Freeland; 1 week ago at 11:45 AM.. Reason: typo
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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DanDan's Avatar
Slope

That is an odd result. It suggests a very uneven HF dispersion in the vertical axis.
Are your speakers vertical or sideways?
In order to achieve Translation to the normal domestic, mobile, or other, let's call it the 'average' actual listener's response we need to listen to a similar response.
Over the decades this has repeatedly been found to be about 6dB down at HF vs LF. Flat is not a useful goal or achievement.
Flat Frequency Response- Not

DD
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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Thread Starter
Speakers are upright. I am still moving stuff around and measuring, making acoustic treatments etc.
music sounds great already not overly bright. As I make more progress I will try and think about "the house curve" cant afford a Trinnov though.

Changing from my focal CMS40 to ATCSMC20 actives too very soon so
will be re-measuring everything.

Really motivating to see the changes in the response and waterfall as I test the treatments.

Thinking of making a limp mass coffee table for the middle of the room.
Old 4 days ago
  #6
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanDan View Post
That is an odd result. It suggests a very uneven HF dispersion in the vertical axis.
Are your speakers vertical or sideways?
In order to achieve Translation to the normal domestic, mobile, or other, let's call it the 'average' actual listener's response we need to listen to a similar response.
Over the decades this has repeatedly been found to be about 6dB down at HF vs LF. Flat is not a useful goal or achievement.
Flat Frequency Response- Not

DD
You were absolutely right. There must have been something wrong with my setup when I measured.

Now I getting a pronounced rolloff all through the spectrum.

What in the acoustics dictate this curve? I really don't want too big a roll off as I don't like too bright mixes.
Does absorption change the actual FR or just the decay?
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