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Do angled walls make tracking/mixing rooms sound better?
Old 13th January 2018
  #1
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Do angled walls make tracking/mixing rooms sound better?

I have read a lot of conflicting info. Are symmetrical rooms really inferior for recording and mixing?
Old 13th January 2018
  #2
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Non-parallel walls prevents flutter echo. Easy as that. A common misconception is that it also prevents room modes, but it does not.
Old 13th January 2018
  #3
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ReDRuMx's Avatar
To add to what Jens said, angled walls make the modes harder to predict. Illustration from The Master Handbook of Acoustics - LINK .

But keep in mind that the structure of the wall (how heavy it is) is also a crucial factor. If your walls are just thin plywood, they are basically going to be transparent to sub frequencies - regardless of room dimensions.

So in order for modes (standing waves) to form, the boundary needs to be reflective for that frequency.
Old 13th January 2018
  #4
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DanDan's Avatar
Beeoooanng!

I have often wondered about this. Hard walls, reasonable angle, say 10-15 degrees. A mode say 123 Hz. A Rack Tom at one boundary of the mode. Boom.... as the wave bounces from mode boundary to the other, travelling along...... Does the Frequency change?

DD
Old 13th January 2018
  #5
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robert82's Avatar
A big deal has been made of Sunset Sound's sloping floor (formerly a garage) that "reduced standing waves" . . . just legend?
Old 14th January 2018
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Old 14th January 2018
  #7
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
Non-parallel walls prevents flutter echo. Easy as that. A common misconception is that it also prevents room modes, but it does not.
Can't acoustic treatment do that too and much cheaper? And aren't the modes the real issue that is more difficult to fix than flutter?
Old 14th January 2018
  #8
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by attaboy_jhb View Post
Can't acoustic treatment do that too and much cheaper?
Since the isolating structure is normally constructed using a rectangular shape,; angeled walls are normally part of the acoustic treatment.
Old 14th January 2018
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Eklund View Post
Since the isolating structure is normally constructed using a rectangular shape,; angeled walls are normally part of the acoustic treatment.
What is the difference between say a reasonably sized rectangular room with thick fluffy treatment all around and having angeled walls? Wouldn't you still need treatment over the angled walls anyway?

I read somewhere else that angeled walls are better for live rooms, is this true?
Old 14th January 2018
  #10
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ReDRuMx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by attaboy_jhb View Post
Can't acoustic treatment do that too and much cheaper? And aren't the modes the real issue that is more difficult to fix than flutter?
Splaying walls redirects some higher frequencies (depending on wall construction) to some other location in the room (back wall), and this can be a useful component of the overall acoustic design.

But if you just want to "fix" flutter echo - as in remove the reflections, then yes, you can easily do that with absorption.

The "Thick fluffy" treatment basically aims to remove all reflections, which potentially solves (or improves) issues with modes, etc. But it also absorbs all high frequencies. Thin splayed walls over the "thick fluffy" treatment can return some high-frequency energy into the room without introducing flutter echo.
Old 14th January 2018
  #11
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReDRuMx View Post
Splaying walls redirects some higher frequencies (depending on wall construction) to some other location in the room (back wall), and this can be a useful component of the overall acoustic design.

But if you just want to "fix" flutter echo - as in remove the reflections, then yes, you can easily do that with absorption.

The "Thick fluffy" treatment basically aims to remove all reflections, which potentially solves (or improves) issues with modes, etc. But it also absorbs all high frequencies. Thin splayed walls over the "thick fluffy" treatment can return some high-frequency energy into the room without introducing flutter echo.

Whether it solves or improves I suppose depends on how much you use right?

Another question please, what would the thin splayed walls be made of? I thought diffusers or would slats over the fluffy bring back a nicer more "professional" mid-high end in the room than the angled walls but am reading about it and wonder now
Old 14th January 2018
  #12
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ReDRuMx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by attaboy_jhb View Post
What would the thin splayed walls be made of?
By "thin", I mean low enough density so that low frequencies can reach bass traping on the other side. Depends - plywood, gypsum, whatever...

Quote:
Originally Posted by attaboy_jhb View Post
Wouldn't diffusers or would slats over the fluffy bring back a nicer more "professional" mid-high end in the room than the angled walls?
Depends on the design. If the answer was always the same, all pro rooms would be the same.
Old 14th January 2018
  #13
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TS-12's Avatar
Angled walls obviously help with room modes, the eq response in a room with angled walls has much much flatter repsone that stratight walled room. even more affective than absoription panels, bass traps and diffusers.
Old 14th January 2018
  #14
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ReDRuMx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by TS-12 View Post
Angled walls obviously help with room modes, the eq response in a room with angled walls has much much flatter repsone that stratight walled room. even more affective than absoription panels, bass traps and diffusers.
The only thing that's obvious to me is that what you are saying is not true
Old 14th January 2018
  #15
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
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