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DIY Corner Bass Traps: Work In Progress
Old 18th August 2019
  #61
TJ5
Gear Nut
I'm planning to build my own small stackable bass traps for a small bedroom. I already built some 4" acoustic panels but now I'm wondering if I really need bass traps if I don't mix at a loud volume.

I use a dbx DriveRack PX to help EQ the room but the Pink Level required for the Auto-EQ Wizard is more than the listening volume that I normally mix at. My Auto-EQ results before any room treatment show that I needed to boost 31.5Hz and 100Hz by the max 12dB and cut 50Hz and 160Hz by 12dB.

Can anyone give me your thoughts on whether or not I should still continue with building the bass traps? Thanks
Old 18th August 2019
  #62
TJ5
Gear Nut
Apparently, this forum says it doesn't matter if I mix at low volumes so I guess I'll be making those bass traps after all: https://sonicscoop.com/2017/03/09/7-...ng-your-mixes/
Old 18th August 2019
  #63
Lives for gear
 

yep
Old 19th August 2019
  #64
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Can anyone give me your thoughts on whether or not I should still continue with building the Bass Traps? Thanks
One things you should NOT be doing, is trying to use EQ to "fix" a room that has no acoustic treatment in it! You can't "fix" most of the acoustic problems in such a room, since most of them are either reflections or resonance problems. First treat, then you can use EQ at the end, when all of the major acoustic issues have been dealt with acoustically.

So yep! Build the bass traps! And the other treatment too...


- Stuart -
Old 19th August 2019
  #65
TJ5
Gear Nut
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
One things you should NOT be doing, is trying to use EQ to "fix" a room that has no acoustic treatment in it! You can't "fix" most of the acoustic problems in such a room, since most of them are either reflections or resonance problems. First treat, then you can use EQ at the end, when all of the major acoustic issues have been dealt with acoustically.

So yep! Build the bass traps! And the other treatment too...


- Stuart -
Thanks for the advice Stuart. I was hoping to go the easy way out of building the bass traps after building the acoustic panels but I just have to commit to the project and get it done.

Another question I have - is it worth buying a Galaxy Audio Live Sound Monitor (CM130) to help with the acoustic treatment process?

Since this is just a hobby for me, I don't want to spend a lot of time and money to get it "perfect". I just want to take some steps to make some improvements. I guess I'm asking for the best bang for the buck or where the principle of diminishing returns kicks in for most hobby home studios.
Old 19th August 2019
  #66
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Another question I have - is it worth buying a Galaxy Audio Live Sound Monitor (CM130) to help with the Acoustic Treatment process?
Unless you need accurate sound level measurements, or want to do precision acoustic tuning of your room, then no, you probably don't need that. It's useful for those things, for sure, but for a simple hobby studio, you can get by without. There are free apps for your cell phone that can give you a rough estimate of sound levels.

Quote:
I guess I'm asking for the best bang for the buck or where the principle of diminishing returns kicks in for most hobby home studios.
The exact point where you hit diminishing returns, is the point where you reach into your wallet to buy more materials, and find you have no money left! OK, so more seriously: treat your room until you are satisfied that it is giving the results you want, in that things you mix in there sound fine when played in other locations (your car, living room, office, shop, church hall, club, ear buds, or wherever else you normally listen to music you make). If you find that your mixes are not "translating well" like this, then you probably need to look at the treatment again, but if your mixes are fine for what you need, then you are done!

Best "bang for the buck" is bass traps: Big ones. Lots of them. Deep. The reason why that's the best place to invest, is because all small rooms have major issues in the low frequencies: By far the biggest problems in your room will occur below about 200 Hz. Getting that region under control will make the biggest overall impact on your room. This normally includes something like "superchunk" bass traps in the room corners, and thick absorption across the entire rear wall, perhaps with wood slats over it to not suck out too much of the high-end.

Next biggest "bang for your buck", is first reflection points: putting good absorption on the walls and ceiling at the places where reflections occur, that are bouncing sound into your ears.

But there's also the "free" bang for your buck, that costs you nothing in money: only your own time: setting up your speakers and mix position in the correct relationship. That can go a long way to improving the acoustic response that you hear. It's very much worthwhile doing that first, before you start treating the room, then doing it again a couple of times during the treatment process, to optimize the locations of the speakers and mix position, since the treatment itself can potentially affect that.

- Stuart -
Old 19th August 2019
  #67
TJ5
Gear Nut
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundman2020 View Post
Unless you need accurate sound level measurements, or want to do precision acoustic tuning of your room, then no, you probably don't need that. It's useful for those things, for sure, but for a simple hobby studio, you can get by without. There are free apps for your cell phone that can give you a rough estimate of sound levels.

The exact point where you hit diminishing returns, is the point where you reach into your wallet to buy more materials, and find you have no money left! OK, so more seriously: treat your room until you are satisfied that it is giving the results you want, in that things you mix in there sound fine when played in other locations (your car, living room, office, shop, church hall, club, ear buds, or wherever else you normally listen to music you make). If you find that your mixes are not "translating well" like this, then you probably need to look at the treatment again, but if your mixes are fine for what you need, then you are done!

Best "bang for the buck" is bass traps: Big ones. Lots of them. Deep. The reason why that's the best place to invest, is because all small rooms have major issues in the low frequencies: By far the biggest problems in your room will occur below about 200 Hz. Getting that region under control will make the biggest overall impact on your room. This normally includes something like "superchunk" bass traps in the room corners, and thick absorption across the entire rear wall, perhaps with wood slats over it to not suck out too much of the high-end.

Next biggest "bang for your buck", is first reflection points: putting good absorption on the walls and ceiling at the places where reflections occur, that are bouncing sound into your ears.

But there's also the "free" bang for your buck, that costs you nothing in money: only your own time: setting up your speakers and mix position in the correct relationship. That can go a long way to improving the acoustic response that you hear. It's very much worthwhile doing that first, before you start treating the room, then doing it again a couple of times during the treatment process, to optimize the locations of the speakers and mix position, since the treatment itself can potentially affect that.

- Stuart -
Thanks for the detailed responses Stuart. I very much appreciate it.

I have read a lot on this topic over the past few months and I have a little bit of knowledge to know mostly what I should do but needed someone to reinforce the direction so thank you for that. I just have to keep in mind that I will appreciate the end result if it can make some difference.

I have played my mixes in other locations in the past when I had a setup in my parent's house. But now that I have my own place, I need to do that again but this time with a treated room so thanks for that reminder too.
Old 9th September 2019
  #68
TJ5
Gear Nut
A week late update but I finished my bass traps over the Labour Day long weekend and I'm glad I got them done. I'm compared my before and after Auto-EQ with my DriveRack PX and was happy to see that I didn't have any more severe +/- 12dB settings any more. For sure, better sounding than without but I'm sure it could be better if I built bigger bass traps.

I did a rush job using pre-cut 2' x 2' 1/2" plywood and borrowed a friend's circular saw to cut them diagonally. Used some 1" x 2" to hold up the plywood pieces in 29" heights so I can stack 3 on top of each other in each corner. Added Roxul Safe and Sound in each bass trap and the same non-stretch fabric I used on my acoustic panels. They're not perfect but you can't really tell once you have them up (as long as you are able to make the front face of the bass trap nice and smooth). If I wanted a more flat finish, I could have used the same rigid fiberglass panels that I used for my acoustic panels (similar to what dramis did with his bass traps). They're just really expensive so I just said forget it.
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