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Are there too many songs out there? Modular Synthesizers
Old 14th March 2014
  #1
Are there too many songs out there?

I mean, with all of the technology available and the internet for delivery, is everyone creating songs now? Was it always this way...it seems harder than ever to get anyone to listen to anything...I think I need a beer.
Old 14th March 2014
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesamay2003 View Post
I mean, with all of the technology available and the internet for delivery, is everyone creating songs now? Was it always this way...it seems harder than ever to get anyone to listen to anything...I think I need a beer.
Old 14th March 2014
  #3
Deleted User
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Way too many songs...yep. Most are mediocre and badly produced.
Old 14th March 2014
  #4
Lives for gear
 

There is basically a music factory in production with 0% quality control. Nothing is in place to highlight the difference between tunes from someone with 20 years of songwriting versus 20 days. Basically no barrier to entry either since everybody has a computer or a cell phone.
Old 14th March 2014
  #5
yup. even the graphic design is misleading. everybody has a strong image/web presence.. sometimes before they have songs
Old 14th March 2014
  #6
Gear Head
 
HSA7's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Case View Post
Way too many songs...yep. Most are mediocre and badly produced.
Clinical. Thread killer.
Old 14th March 2014
  #7
Lives for gear
 

There are too many songs, but they are needles in haystacks to find.

Hey, that means TONS of hay !
Old 14th March 2014
  #8
Gear Nut
 

The number of songs doesn't matter, it's the quality of them that matters! If you spend a reasonable amount of time improvizing on every instruments (including voice) you will get better at songwriting, and if you spend a reasonable time at turning these ideas into songs, you'll get better at crafting. The same goes for reading about things you have to learn : mixing, song structures, lyrics, music theory, knowing your scales and chords, improving your singing or find someone who sings greatly, and so on. If you don't know someone who sings greatly enough for now, start to improve now by singing everytime it is possible to (in the car, in the shower, every time you're alone and that it's daytime so you can make some noise). If you keep doing that over and over, you'll keep getting further on the path of songwriting. It's just that there are a lot of things to learn, and that's some good news! Since most of people don't commit seriously to this over time, you do not enter in competition with the vast majority of songs, so they simply don't matter. The only competition that should exist must be between your own songs, between your older songs and your newer ones, for example.

And when I'm talking about commitment, I don't mean that you have to work on this at full-time. We all have a lot of things to do in life so we cannot devote our entire soul to songwriting and that's perfectly normal. What is important is to keep the focus over time on how we can improve. Having multiple objectives at the same time helps a lot for me. For example, let's say I focus on three things : Finding chord progressions that sound good, improvizing vocals acapella (which improves your singing at the same time) and reading about music theory. When you are getting tired of something, you have some other possibilities, and it's easier to stay focused. Else, if your main focus is the final objective (let's say having a career in music), it will seem you so far that you will constantly lose motivation and faith in your dream, 'cause it's so far. Objectives have to be close enough, so you can achieve them in a maximum of a few months. The key is to find these little objectives that push you in the right direction.

That being said, that is what works for me to stay motivated, I hope it can help!
Old 14th March 2014
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anton1234 View Post
The number of songs doesn't matter, it's the quality of them that matters! If you spend a reasonable amount of time improvizing on every instruments (including voice) you will get better at songwriting, and if you spend a reasonable time at turning these ideas into songs, you'll get better at crafting. The same goes for reading about things you have to learn : mixing, song structures, lyrics, music theory, knowing your scales..

That being said, that is what works for me to stay motivated, I hope it can help!
I believe you got great points but only to a point. There are a lot of songs badly produced and sung or even rapped that made it on the Billboard charts and that because of knowing the right people who like it and proper fund for the promotion of it and how's it was marketed to the certain demographic that like it in the first place. Think about it, when you get a one hit wonder like 'Psy' and his song 'Gangdem style' sell a crazy amount of units to a demographic in North America where 90% don't know what he is saying speaks for it self regarding marketing and a massive promo campagin for the song.

Like you said, practising it the ultimate key to success no matter what and many will eventually become better at it in time. But in a system like the music industry where the majority run on a pretentious self indulge mentality with other crabs in the bucket trying to hold them back and fight for the same spot. Funding gives most an edge oppose to even talent sometimes because if talent is never heard, or its ignored and not found where does it really get someone where Cd sales have dropped more then 70% in the last decade and concerts performances are down more then 20% in the last few years?

Last edited by ANR2011; 14th March 2014 at 09:24 PM.. Reason: Typos
Old 14th March 2014
  #10
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Carnalia Barcus's Avatar
 

There are too many songs out there for me to be able to listen to them all.

I wouldn't say there are too many songs out there, though.

And it was always difficult getting people interested in one's music.
Old 14th March 2014
  #11
Gear Maniac
 

Yes there are more songs.
This is why curation is more important than ever.
Old 14th March 2014
  #12
and i submit that the main forms of curation are all but gone. the labels used to have the job of finding the best of whats out there, signing that artist, and then playing that stuff on the radio. but over time that turned into the labels picking whatever artist they feel like for whatever reason, and marketing them as the real deal, and juicing them up with professional help so the product doesn't seem like tripe. so basically the radio is now a complete non-representation of what's good out there. it's almost like disinformation.

so the music-lover is forced to seek their own curation in the form of blogs and music discovery apps. so far these outlets have been more miss than hit for me, but they are improving slowly. i'm still waiting for the app that really looks at my starred tunes on spotify and gives me half decent to smart recommendations based on that. the curation style blogs are full of stuff that bores me pretty often, and seem to favor quantity over quality. i have to work damn hard to find the gems.

but sometimes i think that's because the gems aren't out there. the irony being we have more songs than ever floating out there, and yet the actual art of songwriting is being swept under the rug by and large, in favor of "artists" regurgitating their personal favorites as their own so they can be rockstars.
Old 14th March 2014
  #13
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cetera, do you feel that labels used to typically sign the best artists, so that there weren't a bunch of talented unsigned bands, singer-songwriters, etc. around?
Old 14th March 2014
  #14
well, i believe there was a time when they at least tried to
Old 14th March 2014
  #15
Gear Maniac
 

Cetera, I think you sound a little jaded.
the way I see it:
little barrier to record music= lots of music out there
little barrier to publish to a huge audience (i.e blogs, bedroom labels) = lots of curators
little money in music = more people genuinely passionate about it curating/creating for the love.

There are some labels that hone in so directly on a sound.. I don't think that happened much in the music industry of the past.
Old 14th March 2014
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sad computer View Post
Cetera, I think you sound a little jaded.
the way I see it:
little barrier to record music= lots of music out there
little barrier to publish to a huge audience (i.e blogs, bedroom labels) = lots of curators
little money in music = more people genuinely passionate about it curating/creating for the love.

There are some labels that hone in so directly on a sound.. I don't think that happened much in the music industry of the past.
i agree with everything you say here to a point. i also don't think i was clear in my point. but here it is: the radio is an amazingly good tool for curation, but it doesn't get used for that at all.

i would also like to propose that most of what passes as curation is more of a game the blogs play to see who can keep up with more cool artists, and it has virtually nothing to do with quality of output. why bother finding the good stuff when you can report on everything so you don't look like an out of touch geek?

and hey, even i can start a record label. so the plethora of new labels means about as much to me as the plethora of new songs. labels by and large are no longer the big curators. i hate the idea that i have to keep up with individual labels now.
Old 14th March 2014
  #17
Gear Nut
 

What we have to keep in mind with nowadays music industry is that there are two main type of songs (and artists) :

1) Songs written by a bunch of professionnal songwriters, who are often label's employees. Artists who get big help from professionnal songwriters are easy to find, they are often the ones we always hear about (Britney Spears, Katy Perry, Kesha, probably all the boys bands, and so on).

2) Songs written by a solo artist, or a band, with little or no contribution from professional songwriters. The number is falling down as the time goes by, but some still make it. The band "Fun" made it, they write most of their stuff, just like Theory of a Deadman (they collaborated on some songs with professional songwriters, as in "Not Meant To Be"), or Nickelback, that achieved an international success, no matter how much hated they are.

Of course, a lot of artists find themselves in-between, not fitting in any of these "types". Anyway, what is important to know is that there is always a way to achieve success, and that is what's important to focus on. Labels are cash-oriented. If you want to sign a contract with them, you have to convince them that what you've got can generate incomes. If they don't want to sign a contract with you after listening to your songs, it's a good indicator that you still have some work to do, or that the person evaluating your material have problem with the way he is evaluating, which is possible but unlikely since he must know what he is doing to have this job and to keep it.

Else, there are songwriting contests, where you can meet publishers that will hear your song. If your product have something special and that you keep doing what it takes so it can be heard by the right persons, you'll end up achieving success, 'cause all along the way you'll improve through the process. Still, you have to work on the way you write your songs so the people end up liking them. If you want people to listen to your songs until they end up liking them, you are blocking your path to success, 'cause you stand still instead of improving your craft. It's not the way it works in the music industry. Not nowadays, for the least.
Old 15th March 2014
  #18
It's fine that there are many songs out there, and it's also fine that labels release a very small percentage of these songs. It's not about the amount of songs out there that matters, it's about the amount of songs that are being promoted properly by a label, songs that are actually heard by an audience. Songs become relevant when there's a fanbase, and when there's a label putting $$$ in promotion. Other than that, it doesn't matter. It would be alarming if there were too many songs out there getting promoted by big label, now yes, that would be a problem. So no, there aren't too many songs out there. If a tree falls in a forest, will you know it if you're not there to hear it?
Old 15th March 2014
  #19
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It used to be expensive to cut vinyl for singles and albums. You could upload anything up for free nowadays on the web.
Old 15th March 2014
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
Think about it, when you get a one hit wonder like 'Psy' and his song 'Gangdem style' sell a crazy amount of units to a demographic in North America where 90% don't know what he is saying speaks for it self regarding marketing and a massive promo campagin for the song.
This is OT, but when video is all time most watched in youtube, there is no need for promo campaign. They made video, it went viral and rest is history. It's all about luck.

Like said there is never too much music out "there". If you know what you like, it's quite easy to follow what new is going on the scene.
Old 15th March 2014
  #21
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Carnalia Barcus's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sad computer View Post
There are some labels that hone in so directly on a sound.. I don't think that happened much in the music industry of the past.
Maybe I don't know what you have in mind with "a sound", but I'd guess you are referring to something like a subgenre or a particular musical "niche". If so, that happened all the time in the past--4AD, Blue Note, BYG, ECM, Folkways, Megaforce, Motown, Real World, Stax . . . just a few of many labels that focused on a subgenre or a particular niche.
Old 15th March 2014
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sad computer View Post
Cetera, I think you sound a little jaded.
the way I see it:
little barrier to record music= lots of music out there
little barrier to publish to a huge audience (i.e blogs, bedroom labels) = lots of curators
little money in music = more people genuinely passionate about it curating/creating for the love.

There are some labels that hone in so directly on a sound.. I don't think that happened much in the music industry of the past.
Sounds like a Arbitrated type of Music Industry otherwise known as the Gate Keepers!
Old 15th March 2014
  #23
It doesn't matter what's been uploaded, it matters what's being promoted/played to a real audience. I don't think 10 friends and your mom are what I would call an audience!
Old 15th March 2014
  #24
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The more the merrier as far as I'm concerned. Music is something everyone can have fun with, no skin off my neck.
Old 15th March 2014
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
Lala Land's Avatar
 

imo quality control is lacking today, in the 60's - 70's, 80's seemed like there were hits coming out every week, perhaps that was a result of the industry at that time - these days were lucky to get a good song released every month, if that.
Old 15th March 2014
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Lago View Post
It doesn't matter what's been uploaded, it matters what's being promoted/played to a real audience. I don't think 10 friends and your mom are what I would call an audience!
Even that's a bigger audience then most people have lol. it always irks me when I see friends "like my music page" those aren't the kind of fans I want. I want real, tangible fans. I want people to click like cause they dig my tunes not because they are my friend and that's a "friendly" thing to do.
Old 16th March 2014
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inverted314 View Post
There is basically a music factory in production with 0% quality control. Nothing is in place to highlight the difference between tunes from someone with 20 years of songwriting versus 20 days. Basically no barrier to entry either since everybody has a computer or a cell phone.


That is why I love the music business. No one needs to go to school and study for years to be a professional. All it takes is an ear for music and practice. Sometimes it even takes less than that. A few tools slapped together by a novice can yield a decent product with a few moue clicks.

Barriers to entry would cause far too many problems. Music that could have been out there would not be released. I never think there can be too much music. The real problem is that there are too many critics.

The rhetoric gets in the way of the results. Most of it is a result of envy and insecurity. I would rather listen to a horrible song than to listen to another rant about how the lack of quality is destroying music industry. The industry will come and go, but music can never be destroyed.
Old 16th March 2014
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desire Inspires View Post


That is why I love the music business. No one needs to go to school and study for years to be a professional. All it takes is an ear for music and practice. Sometimes it even takes less than that. A few tools slapped together by a novice can yield a decent product with a few moue clicks.

Barriers to entry would cause far too many problems. Music that could have been out there would not be released. I never think there can be too much music. The real problem is that there are too many critics.

The rhetoric gets in the way of the results. Most of it is a result of envy and insecurity. I would rather listen to a horrible song than to listen to another rant about how the lack of quality is destroying music industry. The industry will come and go, but music can never be destroyed.
I don't think it's destroying the industry at all. Like Chris Lago said, music that is not in the industry is not, well; in the industry! A lot of music out there is like a doodle in your sketchbook. Nobody is going to know about it unless you show it to them. Whereas music in the actual industry could be likened to showcases in a museum. They display what they can get people to come see (or listen to)

Barriers to entry have only changed as far as gear is concerned. The largest and most important barrier is still the same; actual talent. I have no interest in a "decent" product though. You said yourself in your headphone thread you fancy the finer things and high end stuff. Why be impressed with decent music? I personally have no respect for any artist who doesn't have their 10,000 hours in, but that's just my opinion.
Old 16th March 2014
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inverted314 View Post
Barriers to entry have only changed as far as gear is concerned. The largest and most important barrier is still the same; actual talent. I have no interest in a "decent" product though. You said yourself in your headphone thread you fancy the finer things and high end stuff. Why be impressed with decent music? I personally have no respect for any artist who doesn't have their 10,000 hours in, but that's just my opinion.
True.

Talent is necessary. But sometimes silly songs are entertaining. They aren't great and I recognize that. I do not buy decent music. But I will listen to a decent song that is entertaining on Youtube.
Old 16th March 2014
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desire Inspires View Post


That is why I love the music business. No one needs to go to school and study for years to be a professional. All it takes is an ear for music and practice. Sometimes it even takes less than that. A few tools slapped together by a novice can yield a decent product with a few moue clicks.

Barriers to entry would cause far too many problems. Music that could have been out there would not be released. I never think there can be too much music. The real problem is that there are too many critics.

The rhetoric gets in the way of the results. Most of it is a result of envy and insecurity. I would rather listen to a horrible song than to listen to another rant about how the lack of quality is destroying music industry. The industry will come and go, but music can never be destroyed.
Oh of course, the modern pop music industry is perfect, and the only existing problem is those who dare to not worship it. And of course, it's their psychological problems at the root of their dissenting views.

I guess I better go and purchase the latest Lady Gaga release (after I stop off at McDonalds for some much needed nourishment), I sure wouldn't want you to view me as psychologically inferior. Someday I'll be a Lady Gaga lap dog just like you !
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