The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Dr Lukes Prescription Music Publishing Dynamic Microphones
Old 13th December 2013
  #1
Dr Lukes Prescription Music Publishing

Long shot probably, but

I am wondering does anyone have any experience with Dr Luke's publishing company "Prescription Publishing"?

I was offered a deal by them. Percentage is almost double my last contract, but there is the obvious draw of Dr Luke being incredibly successful and business savvy.

Let me know, thanks either way.
Old 13th December 2013
  #2
Lives for gear
 

I haven't been offered a deal with Dr.Luke's Publishing but inquiring a little more information regarding his compositions/productions
and have some questions!

I know thst he started back in 1997 working on SNL as the shows house bands lead guitarist but wondering if those producers who are signed to publishing deals with his company, if his name goes on the production and not the actually producer who composed/produced the song?

His long credible list of songs produced since then is incredible & I'm now wondering since your the 2nd producer (and/or song writer) to have brought up his Publishing Company on affiliated terms with them.
Old 13th December 2013
  #3
Lives for gear
 

Look at the other writer's they've signed and what their output has been. Don't just look at the 3 or 4 names you recognize at the top. Checking their twitter they've announced five new signings since October, so they're probably a good 30-40 writers deep.

Definitely a good circle to be a part of. But at the same time they'll essentially just plug you into the LA writing scene, which there are many entrances into. With them you'll primarily go session after session in search of a hit for Dr Luke to produce, with some other good opportunities presented as well no doubt.

This could be an amazing opportunity if you write a hit and Luke produces it, there isn't a better executor of pop ideas out there. But could also turn into a massive publishing debt, where 300-500% could take quite some time to work off if you're getting 5% here and there for co-writes because of the leverage of the established names you write with. And then you say they're wanting double on that 5% than your current setup. That could be a steep price.

Just weigh the risk/reward and pro/cons, factoring in your age and the writing placement options you already have on the table.
Old 13th December 2013
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Look at the other writer's they've signed and what their output has been. Don't just look at the 3 or 4 names you recognize at the top. Checking their twitter they've announced five new signings since October, so they're probably a good 30-40 writers deep.

Definitely a good circle to be a part of. But at the same time they'll essentially just plug you into the LA writing scene, which there are many entrances into. With them you'll primarily go session after session in search of a hit for Dr Luke to produce, with some other good opportunities presented as well no doubt.

This could be an amazing opportunity if you write a hit and Luke produces it, there isn't a better executor of pop ideas out there. But could also turn into a massive publishing debt, where 300-500% could take quite some time to work off if you're getting 5% here and there for co-writes because of the leverage of the established names you write with. And then you say they're wanting double on that 5% than your current setup. That could be a steep price.

Just weigh the risk/reward and pro/cons, factoring in your age and the writing placement options you already have on the table.

Good advice, thank you.

Yeah, they've got quite a few writers at this point. Less than my current publishing company (contract runs dry shortly) though. I am hoping since they do have some writers onboard now, that one of them will happen to be on this forum and have some direct experience with the company.

I've been doing this since 2007, and have been with 2 different companies, and the experiences were very different. Practically night and day, even though both companies were reputable and high profile. This experience made me aware that the pub company can be integral in the success or failure of my career, much like a label or mgmt.
Old 14th December 2013
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
Dr. Fleischman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by missioncontrol View Post
Long shot probably, but

I was offered a deal by them. Percentage is almost double my last contract
Could you write something about how this happened for you? Have you been working with some of their writers, or through the A&R's or a manager?

Ps. Isn't 50/50 a standard publishing deal nowadays?
Old 18th December 2013
  #6
Lives for gear
 
BlackBackDrop's Avatar
 

Luke has two pubs, Perc is for sync but I might be wrong.
Old 19th December 2013
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Fleischman View Post
Could you write something about how this happened for you? Have you been working with some of their writers, or through the A&R's or a manager?

Ps. Isn't 50/50 a standard publishing deal nowadays?


Its your WORK that will get their attention, WORK that is making an impact in some way. Not managers and a&rs hustling. Do solid work that impacts or shows promise or exceptionality, and you'll definitely cross their path.

Billboard hit Luke up on Twitter, and Luke checked the link and hit him back. Was that simple. His work spoke for itself.
Old 19th December 2013
  #8
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Checking their twitter they've announced five new signings since October, so they're probably a good 30-40 writers deep.
In the announcement of the joint venture of Prescription Songs and Big Maschine Music earlier this year (it was announced in april) it was stated that Luke's camp was (at the time) about 30 - 40 writers deep.

Big Machine Music, Dr. Luke's Prescription Form Joint Venture | Billboard

I don't know how long Luke's camp has been this big. If you look at the 2013 hits which Luke co-wrote/produced (Wrecking Ball, Roar, Timber), it's mostly the top 3-4 guys in the songwriting credits.
Old 20th December 2013
  #9
Gear Addict
 
stclair's Avatar
 

Has does the devils testicles does that work, when you have 40 writers yet all the hits are credited to the same group of people over and over again?

Are the 40 or so writers not delivering??
Old 20th December 2013
  #10
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stclair View Post
Has does the devils testicles does that work, when you have 40 writers yet all the hits are credited to the same group of people over and over again?

Are the 40 or so writers not delivering??


The publishing game is to snatch up as many potential up-and-comers as possible, before they have much leverage, for as great a percent and as little money upfront as possible. When one shows they can deliver hits, they move into the hitmaking circle while the rest continue to slug in out in a marathon of sessions mining for their own hit. With help and feedback from the publishing camp to various degrees, of course.

That's the standard publishing company strategy, not just Prescription.
Old 20th December 2013
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Ol' Betsey's Avatar
All real publishing companies have 30-40 if not more writers.

Think of the big houses. It's insane the amount of people they represent. You're lucky if these companies even actively pursue money that you're owed let alone pursue many writing opportunities on your behalf.

It's not my scene but I imagine Dr. Luke's company gets approached by lots and lots of different entities that need music. And not just pop singers either. Song/music creation is a huge industry and the pop world is only one part of it.

I say give it a crack. Sure you'll be starting at the bottom of that list of 30-40 but at least you're on a list that has a very definitive history of creating hits and it's up to you (and a little luck. and probably more than a little internal politics too. but it's like that in ANY job...) to crack the top of that list.

And of course their first offer isn't as good as your current deal but they'd probably think you (or your lawyer) are stupid if you didn't come in negotiating.`

I mean don't sign your life away but it must be worth a punt, no?

Good luck!

R.
Old 20th December 2013
  #12
Lives for gear
 
Ol' Betsey's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
The publishing game is to snatch up as many potential up-and-comers as possible, before they have much leverage, for as great a percent and as little money upfront as possible. When one shows they can deliver hits, they move into the hitmaking circle while the rest continue to slug in out in a marathon of sessions mining for their own hit. With help and feedback from the publishing camp to various degrees, of course.

That's the standard publishing company strategy, not just Prescription.
Yep. In a nutshell.

R.
Old 20th December 2013
  #13
Gear Maniac
 
Dr. Fleischman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Its your WORK that will get their attention, WORK that is making an impact in some way. Not managers and a&rs hustling. Do solid work that impacts or shows promise or exceptionality, and you'll definitely cross their path.

Billboard hit Luke up on Twitter, and Luke checked the link and hit him back. Was that simple. His work spoke for itself.
It's utopia. There must be some decent work and talent behind you but no one really cares for anonymous people sending material. Just look at the screenshot.. There are too much. Maybe it's possible to get their attencion like this but the chances are close to 0 and the dreams can easily be broken.
Attached Thumbnails
Dr Lukes Prescription Music Publishing-screen-shot-2013-12-20-2.13.02-pm.png  
Old 20th December 2013
  #14
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Fleischman View Post
It's utopia. There must be some decent work and talent behind you but no one really cares for anonymous people sending material. Just look at the screenshot.. There are too much. Maybe it's possible to get their attencion like this but the chances are close to 0 and the dreams can easily be broken.
It's true, they get a lot of emails. Still, they want to find the next great writer as much as you want to be that writer. So if you actually are good enough, and you're putting yourself out there (not just putting stuff online, but hanging with other writers, networking, etc), you will get noticed.
Old 20th December 2013
  #15
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Fleischman View Post
It's utopia. There must be some decent work and talent behind you but no one really cares for anonymous people sending material. Just look at the screenshot.. There are too much. Maybe it's possible to get their attencion like this but the chances are close to 0 and the dreams can easily be broken.

If it's really your dream I'd recommend doing something that makes a significant impact to get noticed, not just sending out emails (I'd also recommend moving to LA and spending several years refining your craft and and getting into the mix of successful songwriters and producers.) But while chances are extremely slim, they're definitely reading, listening, and signing people off of emails.

If your dreams are broken by a non-response from an email to dr Luke, then I'd just focus on a new line of work! The entertainment business is only for the thick skinned.
Old 20th December 2013
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
Dr. Fleischman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
If your dreams are broken by a non-response from an email to dr Luke, then I'd just focus on a new line of work!
Of course not. I'm just saying that tweeting music to Dr. Luke (or whoever that big) and waiting for it to happen is waste of time. Without good people around, smile on your face and a few handshakes nothing significant is going to happen.
Old 20th December 2013
  #17
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Fleischman View Post
Of course not. I'm just saying that tweeting music to Dr. Luke (or whoever that big) and waiting for it to happen is waste of time.
But that's a incorrect reporting of what happened. It was Billboard that tweeted and not Johnny-Nobody-Knows-Me who directly tweeted him.

Quote:
Without good people around, smile on your face and a few handshakes nothing significant is going to happen.
The "good people" and "handshakes" is what I what think of as the six-degrees-of-separation to success. Make exceptional music and somebody who knows somebody will come across you and help you make further connections. Somebody out there (besides the artist's mother) has to love your music. It may start with one youtube viewer.

In my experience, the ones who complain the loudest about the "music industry" not noticing them are the ones making the most horrible music. They lack the self-awareness to realize how unpalatable and boring their music is. Therefore, it's easier to blame some other entity out there or leave it all to luck. Luck is definitely part of it but the bigger reason before luck even enters the equation is the mastering the fundamentals of creating appealing music.
Old 20th December 2013
  #18
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason West View Post
But that's a incorrect reporting of what happened. It was Billboard that tweeted and not Johnny-Nobody-Knows-Me who directly tweeted him.

To clarify, Billboard the 20-something year old producer, not the magazine. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billboard_(producer)

He had won a noteworthy contest before then so he had some sort impact already going, though not much. It was the tweet that Luke checked that led to him being a part of the crew.

You can see though he's only had a handful of placements since then, which are slowing down rather than speeding up. . . he's just another of the 40+ on the roster.
Old 20th December 2013
  #19
Gear Maniac
 
Dr. Fleischman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason West View Post
In my experience, the ones who complain the loudest about the "music industry" not noticing them are the ones making the most horrible music. They lack the self-awareness to realize how unpalatable and boring their music is. Therefore, it's easier to blame some other entity out there or leave it all to luck. Luck is definitely part of it but the bigger reason before luck even enters the equation is the mastering the fundamentals of creating appealing music.
You're absolutely right. Look at the people hating pop music here on GS forum - I don't think too many of them are capable of writing a decent, catchy song. About the luck, I believe that most of the time it's just finding an opportunity to embrace.
Do you have any idea how Prescritpion (and US labels in general) copes with the visa issues? Billboard is Canadian (I think they signed his brother too), Cirkut...
Old 20th December 2013
  #20
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Fleischman View Post
Do you have any idea how Prescritpion (and US labels in general) copes with the visa issues? Billboard is Canadian
Canada and USA have friendly reciprocal travel agreements for visitors. No visas required for either citizens to visit the other country if they stay less than 6 months.

(Mexico and USA on the other hand is a different deal though.)
Old 20th December 2013
  #21
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason West View Post
Canada and USA have friendly reciprocal travel agreements for visitors. No visas required for either citizens to visit the other country if they stay less than 6 months.

(Mexico and USA on the other hand is a different deal though.)
I think he might have been referring to work visas or the complications that COULD arise when an out-of-country contractor needs to get paid. Not necessarily just visiting the USA to enter the studio. Maybe I'm wrong.
Old 20th December 2013
  #22
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Fleischman View Post
You're absolutely right. Look at the people hating pop music here on GS forum - I don't think too many of them are capable of writing a decent, catchy song.
Yep.

And sure, even the folks who actually write good music complain about not being noticed too. But their voices are outnumbered by the clueless musicians who think their material deserves to be heard. Everytime I see a Soundcloud or Reverbnation link for the loud complainer, I check it out and immediately think, "yep, you just go right on thinking the world is missing out on your genius." The rest of us will divert our energies into polishing the type of music that get's people excited and gets forwarded on to the next set of people who might make things happen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bifftannen View Post
I think he might have been referring to work visas or the complications that COULD arise when an out-of-country contractor needs to get paid. Not necessarily just visiting the USA to enter the studio.
I don't know Dr Luke's modus operandi but I don't see why a special work-visa (not tourist-visa) to enable Billboard's physical presence in Los Angeles would be necessary.

These are the special work-visas available: USA State Dept Temporary Worker Visas

Although the P-1, P-2, and P-3 look somewhat applicable, I don't see it as a dealbreaker if the foreign songwriter can't get it. If Dr Luke's team has a songwriters sprint, I'd imagine it might last a few weeks at most and anyone who doesn't live in the USA can just fly in on a tourist visa and leave before the 6 month deadline (or 90 day deadline for most European citizens.)

As far as paying (royalties) a foreign songwriter, the visa shouldn't have anything to do with it.
Old 20th December 2013
  #23
sorry, i forgot about this thread and didn't realize all the responses were here. thanks for the info everyone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Fleischman View Post
Could you write something about how this happened for you? Have you been working with some of their writers, or through the A&R's or a manager?

Ps. Isn't 50/50 a standard publishing deal nowadays?
i was offered the deal because my current deal expired (with a diff company), and i suppose i was recommended to them by someone i worked with. i've done some notable work in the last few years that they would be interested in, but i prefer to remain at least somewhat anonymous on internet forums. all i know is my manager called and said these are the companies who offered you a deal, and dr lukes was one of them.
Old 30th January 2014
  #24
Gear Nut
 

So, did you make a decision yet?
Old 25th March 2014
  #25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marquez View Post
So, did you make a decision yet?
I ended up taking the deal. Worked out beautifully. They have been amazing so far.
Old 25th March 2014
  #26
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by missioncontrol View Post
I ended up taking the deal. Worked out beautifully. They have been amazing so far.
That's great to hear...congrats!
Old 8th April 2014
  #27
Here for the gear
Question?

Quote:
Originally Posted by missioncontrol View Post
I ended up taking the deal. Worked out beautifully. They have been amazing so far.

Just curious, with a deal to Dr Luke, can you still actively pursue your own music career, perform and release music or are you locked into the company?
Congrats by the way!

First time post!
Old 14th September 2014
  #28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollydenko View Post
Just curious, with a deal to Dr Luke, can you still actively pursue your own music career, perform and release music or are you locked into the company?
Congrats by the way!

First time post!
sorry just saw this-

Yes, i can actively pursue my own career. This deal only pertains to publishing. Performance and recordings are totally separate

Thanks!
Old 14th September 2014
  #29
Gear Head
 
gavriil2's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
But could also turn into a massive publishing debt, where 300-500% could take quite some time to work off if you're getting 5% here and there for co-writes because of the leverage of the established names you write with. And then you say they're wanting double on that 5% than your current setup. That could be a steep price.
What does this mean? Where does the debt come from?
Old 14th September 2014
  #30
Gear Head
 
gavriil2's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
The publishing game is to snatch up as many potential up-and-comers as possible, before they have much leverage, for as great a percent and as little money upfront as possible. When one shows they can deliver hits, they move into the hitmaking circle while the rest continue to slug in out in a marathon of sessions mining for their own hit. With help and feedback from the publishing camp to various degrees, of course.

That's the standard publishing company strategy, not just Prescription.
Is there a substitute to the "publishing game"? Another path to success?
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump