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Future of Music
Old 31st May 2020
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Future of Music

Hello everyone,

I'm songwriter, I sing and play guitar yet I define myself more as a lyricist, poet, melody generator and arranger. Lately I'm more dedicated to learning more about music production and so with his first post on the first day of my registration here, I'd like to ask you some questions and wonder about your opinions.. Here we go:

1- There are just too many sounds, VSTs, plug-ins etc to explore, choose from, too many things to try out, make decisions to make a song better, perfect. I mean for a perfectionist there is no end to improving and finalizing a song. How can we stop and say this song is finished and if it is impossible to try out everything about sounds to try out in a lifetime then what could be a good rule of thumb to balance exploration vs exploitation of what's already known, learned and what we have on hand? I'd like to improve my mixing techniques and open up myself to new possibilities of sounds, genres and methods to create my new songs, so what steps are useful to take to begin with? What are some most popular instruments, VSTs, sound libraries you recommend every rock/pop musician check into? (with an open mind about adding elements from other genres such as electronic)

2- Why do people use sound libraries? Like Splice, Loopcloud. To create loops? How can one best make use of these services? There are great VSTs like Exdrummer, Ezkeys with great sounds, why do people still look for their own sounds and how do they use those sounds differently than existing libraries of VSTs?

3- What are your opinions on online DAWs like Soundtrap, Bandlab? Which ones do you use and like the most and why? How can a musician make use of such available services to positively impact their song production?

4- What are your opinions on affordable or free DAWs like sound bridge and waveform pro? How would you compare them to Studio One which I quite enjoy..

5- I have no music theory and I want to improve myself in recording/mixing/mastering. Are there compact free or paid online courses like on coursera, udemy or youtube free or premium that you advise every songwriter/ musician better complete with full absorption to get all the fundamentals about recording/mixing/songwiting/basic note/chord progression/harmony essentials/ Major mand Minor scales, Circle of Fifths, and basic Chord Theory etc.. Do you think having knowledge od basic or advance music theory helps better songwriting/arrangement or impedes? How can it help or impede?

6- Do you think next level (or already current) trend is for a musician to play or using vsts and record all instruments and create a song from scratch, record/mix/master all by oneself, and publish steaming ready quality albums and disintermediate all the other people. If yes how can I quickly adapt to this trend and get to produce steam ready quality albums as soon as possible?

7- What do you think future music will sound like? Like daft punk changed things and what is the next daft punk sound? Do you think country and rock will die out? Nowadays I like to use more synths and maybe even electronics to bring my 60s-90s sounding pop/rock sound to 2020s and preferably more future proof 2030s level. To that end, what would you advise? What VSTs, tutorials, sound libraries, plug-ins you'd recommend me to check out that you think are the most popular now or will be or even if not are the best or most popular out there on the market bot aspiring musicians who want to produce extraordinary work should definitely check out?

8- I feel like today music became a commodity, it's hardwork and long time investment to create an original song and it's so easy to consume it for listener like a single use entertainment as there are endless choices and I feel like today we live in the age that nothing is so special anymore. Internet and consumption have replaced "God" and morality and humane pace of producing cooking sth at a low heat you know? slow but steady, joyful production. It feels like music cant be a single career and source of income for one anymore with all the competition and ease of home production. So for me I came to the conclusion that music production is to be done analogous to keeping journaling ow ones private feelings and thoughts as self reflection function. Okay maybe it's always been like this and because some journals were really interesting read, people wanted to "listen" to them so they got a career and this cycle maybe still remains. But Im just not sure if things got easier with internet and home daws or much harder? I feel like people care so much less than the past today in general, music is not much for connection or relation anymore but entertainment. I mean for me music is about being curious about existence, exploring deep insights, interacting with other inspiring feelings, thoughts, perspectives etc.. Either such people switched to producing entertainment music to keep up with society's direction and not feel isolated or they kind of gave up producing thinking that people would probably not care or give due attention to listen to serious pieces.. Like is it still possible to create masterpieces like Radiohead, Muse, Keane did or those days are gone for good? Now how can I reconcile those great bands with the modernity of new age music without making concessions and compromises in quality, soul and emotions? Is there still room in music for soul and emotions in rock? Or is it dying.. This is also a moral question you know. Should one give in to degeneration and moral decadence? Correct my perspective if it's too narrow when it equalize future and modern with moral decline etc.. please provide me with examples like how can past great music be better today and in the future and still have same sincere deep soul and emotions if not more and stronger? What is the direction of music in the near and far future? What can musicians do to adapt to future direction and still preserving vintage, timeless values of music, life and being human?

Thank you
Old 1st June 2020
  #2
Hey, and welcome. Thanks for a well thought out thread.
I'm in a similar boat as you. I'm more a lyricist and less of a music theory prodigy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ceyhun242 View Post
1- There are just too many sounds, VSTs, plug-ins etc to explore, choose from, too many things to try out, make decisions to make a song better, perfect. I mean for a perfectionist there is no end to improving and finalizing a song. How can we stop and say this song is finished and if it is impossible to try out everything about sounds to try out in a lifetime then what could be a good rule of thumb to balance exploration vs exploitation of what's already known, learned and what we have on hand? I'd like to improve my mixing techniques and open up myself to new possibilities of sounds, genres and methods to create my new songs, so what steps are useful to take to begin with? What are some most popular instruments, VSTs, sound libraries you recommend every rock/pop musician check into? (with an open mind about adding elements from other genres such as electronic)
Two questions in one there. The first one i think many of us struggle with. You have Picasso, Monet, Warhol. You can't learn to paint like all of them. What do you focus on? "how many keys on the piano is too many?". That question only you can answer. But it's a journey, not a destination.

I do like this video as a source of inspiration in how to go from a halfassed idea to a finished product on the market place:


Second question: It depends. I could recommend
the Arturia Jupiter-8V. If you like Vangelis and that 80s space sound.
Native Instruments Kontakt From real sounding violins to snare drums.
Apple GarageBand Has a lot of nice set ups for making demos. It's easy to lay down drums and set up a bass line so you can play with your idea.
Oeksound Soothe 2 is great for rounding off those nasty high frequencies.

But it all depends on what you're looking to create.

2, 3 and 4 I'll skip.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ceyhun242 View Post
5- I have no music theory and I want to improve myself in recording/mixing/mastering. Are there compact free or paid online courses like on coursera, udemy or youtube free or premium that you advise every songwriter/ musician better complete with full absorption to get all the fundamentals about recording/mixing/songwiting/basic note/chord progression/harmony essentials/ Major mand Minor scales, Circle of Fifths, and basic Chord Theory etc.. Do you think having knowledge od basic or advance music theory helps better songwriting/arrangement or impedes? How can it help or impede?
No man can do everything, and when you try be a band photographer, guitarist, drummer, vocalist, and a producer, you end up being none of those. Jack of all trades.... master of none is the old saying. However, I do get it. Nowadays with tecnology being what it is, and with no one knowing how to play together it's hard not to just say **** it and do it all alone. I will recommend this documentary that breaks down music theory in a understandable and visual way:

With some searching you should be able to find all 6 parts. Not sure if BBC sells it, or has it all online somewhere. But this breaks down everything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ceyhun242 View Post
6- Do you think next level (or already current) trend is for a musician to play or using vsts and record all instruments and create a song from scratch, record/mix/master all by oneself, and publish steaming ready quality albums and disintermediate all the other people. If yes how can I quickly adapt to this trend and get to produce steam ready quality albums as soon as possible?
I believe that trend is already here in full force. If your question is "how can I make art as fast as possible?" then most people here would say "What's the point in making art as fast as possible?" Do you want to be a great composer, or just be famous?

mixing and mastering by yourself is like editing your own book. It can be done, but kinda defeats the purpose.

all-digital midi music is probably the industry norm by now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ceyhun242 View Post
7- What do you think future music will sound like? Like daft punk changed things and what is the next daft punk sound? Do you think country and rock will die out? Nowadays I like to use more synths and maybe even electronics to bring my 60s-90s sounding pop/rock sound to 2020s and preferably more future proof 2030s level. To that end, what would you advise? What VSTs, tutorials, sound libraries, plug-ins you'd recommend me to check out that you think are the most popular now or will be or even if not are the best or most popular out there on the market bot aspiring musicians who want to produce extraordinary work should definitely check out?
If you wanna ask me what the next level looks like, well it will to make you and I obsolete:

This is a song made solely by an AI (Machine learning).

This is a painting made solely by an AI
https://i.imgur.com/JG0bWBW.jpg


You could in theory right now within a few hours make a 20 track album ready (with cover) for Spotify/Apple music without actually being involved in the art making process, only the curation part. Also this stuff will only get "better" with time. People here are gonna scream "there's no feeling to it", but they are also the same people shaking their fist at the silly music kids listen to.

if you're looking solely for hits, you could make a lo-fi youtube channel, bounce 80 AI made lo-fi beats and run them on repeat. name it "Chill lo-fi to study to in the apocalypse" or something. The question is; what is the ****ing point?

Things move in waves, and who knows if Rock will make a triumphant return in 20 years. I hope so. I have always loved the effect of time, and find myself looking more backwards than forwards nowadays.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ceyhun242 View Post
8- I feel like today music became a commodity, it's hardwork and long time investment to create an original song and it's so easy to consume it for listener like a single use entertainment as there are endless choices and I feel like today we live in the age that nothing is so special anymore. Internet and consumption have replaced "God" and morality and humane pace of producing cooking sth at a low heat you know? slow but steady, joyful production. It feels like music cant be a single career and source of income for one anymore with all the competition and ease of home production. So for me I came to the conclusion that music production is to be done analogous to keeping journaling ow ones private feelings and thoughts as self reflection function. Okay maybe it's always been like this and because some journals were really interesting read, people wanted to "listen" to them so they got a career and this cycle maybe still remains. But Im just not sure if things got easier with internet and home daws or much harder? I feel like people care so much less than the past today in general, music is not much for connection or relation anymore but entertainment. I mean for me music is about being curious about existence, exploring deep insights, interacting with other inspiring feelings, thoughts, perspectives etc.. Either such people switched to producing entertainment music to keep up with society's direction and not feel isolated or they kind of gave up producing thinking that people would probably not care or give due attention to listen to serious pieces.. Like is it still possible to create masterpieces like Radiohead, Muse, Keane did or those days are gone for good? Now how can I reconcile those great bands with the modernity of new age music without making concessions and compromises in quality, soul and emotions? Is there still room in music for soul and emotions in rock? Or is it dying.. This is also a moral question you know. Should one give in to degeneration and moral decadence? Correct my perspective if it's too narrow when it equalize future and modern with moral decline etc.. please provide me with examples like how can past great music be better today and in the future and still have same sincere deep soul and emotions if not more and stronger? What is the direction of music in the near and far future? What can musicians do to adapt to future direction and still preserving vintage, timeless values of music, life and being human?
A great question. Maybe the question. One that every artist should ask themselves. We are in the era of "ART WITHOUT MEANING". and it doesn't just reflect where we are musically but also as a society. We have grown more distant (but perhaps it's just evolution. Haven't all old men exclaimed this throughout time?

We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in
Machinery that gives us abundance has left us in want

This was written 80 years ago.)



Here's what I have found, struggling with the same questions you do.
- Art is about the process. Maybe the answer is not to make more songs, but to be more fulfilled when you do.
- An artist seeks for truth. In whatever form that is. ****ing Ernest Hemingway. Bob Dylan. If you're scared to write something, then you're probably on the right track.
- It's a long race, and in the end you're only running against yourself.
Old 1st June 2020
  #3
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I hate that much of today's "music" is a race to see who can post half baked (or not) ideas online the fastest and that people seem to be perfectly fine not working w/others as music is inherently social.

The inherently social aspect of making music is what I personally have felt/feel I'll never experience and it saddens me.

Music @ ceyhun242 has always been a commodity but this is the era where the curtain has been pulled back on what makes it a commodity: find a naïve young man or woman, "groom" them at their most impressionable stage (preferably preteen to adolescent) and exploit them as long as they are willing to be part of the machine, never questioning who/what/where/when/why/how.

Last edited by boombapdame; 1st June 2020 at 06:30 PM..
Old 5th June 2020
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
I hate that much of today's "music" is a race to see who can post half baked (or not) ideas online the fastest and that people seem to be perfectly fine not working w/others as music is inherently social.

The inherently social aspect of making music is what I personally have felt/feel I'll never experience and it saddens me.

Music @ ceyhun242 has always been a commodity but this is the era where the curtain has been pulled back on what makes it a commodity: find a naïve young man or woman, "groom" them at their most impressionable stage (preferably preteen to adolescent) and exploit them as long as they are willing to be part of the machine, never questioning who/what/where/when/why/how.
Hello BBD:
I will say that I typically find myself aligned with your posts but will admit I did not fully understand this particular post.

Are you saying that you believe most music is haphazardly posted? Additionally are you saying g that social music is created by teams?

For the record, my belief is that commercial music is created by teams today and that most of this music is forgettable. So my theory is and has always been that collaboration does not create transcendent music, typically just thin and brief marketing successes.

Hope you are well
Old 5th June 2020
  #5
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What @ drcmusic I mean is so much of music today is couched in worrying about social validation e.g. plays, likes, etc. which is accelerated via social media hence in turn you get people literally posting fart noises, etc. just to say they have something online.

Music making in today's era seems to consist of someone in front of a screen copy-pasting loops and thinking it's producing but it's more like laptop noodling, and couple that w/isolation, not as in practice w/an instrument but more isolation as in "people don't seem to have others they can make music with."

Unlike genuine interest in someone's artistry which resulted in word of mouth started by a listener or listeners regarding an artist or artists (re: the social act of telling one's friends about the music you discover(ed) you like, etc.) social media attention can be bought w/bots.

Think about how most people interested in music begin, they find they want to either sing or play an instrument, so they join a choir (via one's religious denomination or school) or an ensemble/band and it goes from there which is the inherently social aspect, which in turn results in a music making culture.
Old 5th June 2020
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
What @ drcmusic I mean is so much of music today is couched in worrying about social validation e.g. plays, likes, etc. which is accelerated via social media hence in turn you get people literally posting fart noises, etc. just to say they have something online.
Yeah I don't think the standard social media strategy of "steady consistent content on a schedule without fail" is a good strategy for making great music. Those that adopt that strategy, which works for marketing and information type posters, are probably hurting themselves by rushing the process.

Whatever though, that's focusing on what the masses are doing, not those actually impacting culture. Its like being upset that someone in the 80s likes to go around saying he's in a band because he bought a guitar and linked up with bad drummer. Who cares, they don't matter.

I'm new to instagram but I've overall enjoyed it. Its the most positive place on the internet I've yet to experience, almost zero negativity at all in fact, the polar opposite of twitter (and often gearslutz ). Its cool seeing so many creative people share their work and process, I enjoy flipping through hashtags and seeing what people are up to. I'm often impressed!
Old 6th June 2020
  #7
Moral decadence and decline?!?

There is still loads of amazing, breathtaking music produced. And crime has been declining for decades.

I'm pretty bewildered by this thread tbh.

Play the cards you're dealt, wishing things were different and begging for the return of the good old days (looking at the bands you mention, that was around 2008) won't achieve anything.

All the bands that achieved genuine greatness, Bowie, Miles Davis, The Beatles, Public Enemy, Bjork, Marvin Gaye, etc. etc. all stepped FORWARD and created something new even if they started off somewhere pretty generic. No great band has ever tried to live in the past, even if they found inspiration there.

As I got told on day 1 of art school: The answer is always hard work.
Old 23rd June 2020
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soldat View Post
Moral decadence and decline?!?

There is still loads of amazing, breathtaking music produced. And crime has been declining for decades.

I'm pretty bewildered by this thread tbh.

Play the cards you're dealt, wishing things were different and begging for the return of the good old days (looking at the bands you mention, that was around 2008) won't achieve anything.

All the bands that achieved genuine greatness, Bowie, Miles Davis, The Beatles, Public Enemy, Bjork, Marvin Gaye, etc. etc. all stepped FORWARD and created something new even if they started off somewhere pretty generic. No great band has ever tried to live in the past, even if they found inspiration there.

As I got told on day 1 of art school: The answer is always hard work.
I agree.
People want to argue about skill vs inspiration and naive luck vs schooled craft but it takes all kinds. The people who do something memorable have one thing in common that is finding what their niche is and getting good at being themselves.
Old 24th June 2020
  #9
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We @ KellMartin have as a society grown distant because tech promised us, via the creation of the Internet, immediate connection, but we are and have become so connected that we are disconnected from everything and everyone, and over informed and simultaneously under informed.
Old 25th June 2020
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ceyhun242 View Post
Hello everyone,

I'm songwriter, I sing and play guitar yet I define myself more as a lyricist, poet, melody generator and arranger. Lately I'm more dedicated to learning more about music production and so with his first post on the first day of my registration here, I'd like to ask you some questions and wonder about your opinions.. Here we go:

1- There are just too many sounds, VSTs, plug-ins etc to explore, choose from, too many things to try out, make decisions to make a song better, perfect. I mean for a perfectionist there is no end to improving and finalizing a song. How can we stop and say this song is finished and if it is impossible to try out everything about sounds to try out in a lifetime then what could be a good rule of thumb to balance exploration vs exploitation of what's already known, learned and what we have on hand? I'd like to improve my mixing techniques and open up myself to new possibilities of sounds, genres and methods to create my new songs, so what steps are useful to take to begin with? What are some most popular instruments, VSTs, sound libraries you recommend every rock/pop musician check into? (with an open mind about adding elements from other genres such as electronic)

2- Why do people use sound libraries? Like Splice, Loopcloud. To create loops? How can one best make use of these services? There are great VSTs like Exdrummer, Ezkeys with great sounds, why do people still look for their own sounds and how do they use those sounds differently than existing libraries of VSTs?

3- What are your opinions on online DAWs like Soundtrap, Bandlab? Which ones do you use and like the most and why? How can a musician make use of such available services to positively impact their song production?

4- What are your opinions on affordable or free DAWs like sound bridge and waveform pro? How would you compare them to Studio One which I quite enjoy..

5- I have no music theory and I want to improve myself in recording/mixing/mastering. Are there compact free or paid online courses like on coursera, udemy or youtube free or premium that you advise every songwriter/ musician better complete with full absorption to get all the fundamentals about recording/mixing/songwiting/basic note/chord progression/harmony essentials/ Major mand Minor scales, Circle of Fifths, and basic Chord Theory etc.. Do you think having knowledge od basic or advance music theory helps better songwriting/arrangement or impedes? How can it help or impede?

6- Do you think next level (or already current) trend is for a musician to play or using vsts and record all instruments and create a song from scratch, record/mix/master all by oneself, and publish steaming ready quality albums and disintermediate all the other people. If yes how can I quickly adapt to this trend and get to produce steam ready quality albums as soon as possible?

7- What do you think future music will sound like? Like daft punk changed things and what is the next daft punk sound? Do you think country and rock will die out? Nowadays I like to use more synths and maybe even electronics to bring my 60s-90s sounding pop/rock sound to 2020s and preferably more future proof 2030s level. To that end, what would you advise? What VSTs, tutorials, sound libraries, plug-ins you'd recommend me to check out that you think are the most popular now or will be or even if not are the best or most popular out there on the market bot aspiring musicians who want to produce extraordinary work should definitely check out?

8- I feel like today music became a commodity, it's hardwork and long time investment to create an original song and it's so easy to consume it for listener like a single use entertainment as there are endless choices and I feel like today we live in the age that nothing is so special anymore. Internet and consumption have replaced "God" and morality and humane pace of producing cooking sth at a low heat you know? slow but steady, joyful production. It feels like music cant be a single career and source of income for one anymore with all the competition and ease of home production. So for me I came to the conclusion that music production is to be done analogous to keeping journaling ow ones private feelings and thoughts as self reflection function. Okay maybe it's always been like this and because some journals were really interesting read, people wanted to "listen" to them so they got a career and this cycle maybe still remains. But Im just not sure if things got easier with internet and home daws or much harder? I feel like people care so much less than the past today in general, music is not much for connection or relation anymore but entertainment. I mean for me music is about being curious about existence, exploring deep insights, interacting with other inspiring feelings, thoughts, perspectives etc.. Either such people switched to producing entertainment music to keep up with society's direction and not feel isolated or they kind of gave up producing thinking that people would probably not care or give due attention to listen to serious pieces.. Like is it still possible to create masterpieces like Radiohead, Muse, Keane did or those days are gone for good? Now how can I reconcile those great bands with the modernity of new age music without making concessions and compromises in quality, soul and emotions? Is there still room in music for soul and emotions in rock? Or is it dying.. This is also a moral question you know. Should one give in to degeneration and moral decadence? Correct my perspective if it's too narrow when it equalize future and modern with moral decline etc.. please provide me with examples like how can past great music be better today and in the future and still have same sincere deep soul and emotions if not more and stronger? What is the direction of music in the near and far future? What can musicians do to adapt to future direction and still preserving vintage, timeless values of music, life and being human?

Thank you
I'm confused by what you mean by "moral decline" and "moral decadence" etc? Do you view the past as being "better" by moral standards? If so, why? I would totally disagree, and i'm curious (and slightly alarmed) at how you came to this conclusion.

Of course there's still soul and emotion in modern music. People haven't changed, and their desire to communicate, connect and tell stories hasn't changed either. In parallel there has always been an easy "popular/consumable/product" mentality within the industry too. That's not unique to this generation of music - not by a long shot - and has existed as long as any form of 'music industry' has. The only things that have changed are the popular tastes and the tools available to make and market it. I get rather frustrated when people talk about 'modern music' as if it's one single, defined entity. One devoid of the artisty, creativity, emotion and/or skill of days gone by. That's just not true. In the era of home production and directly connecting with you audience via the internet, there's (arguably) no better time for real, unfiltered art and emotions channeled through music. You no longer need to keep in mind the business interests and the filtering, control and shaping from a label to reach your audience. There's a lot to go through, for sure, but arguably it's never been easier to sit at your laptop, have a good search through and find a song/album/artist that really resonates with you. Far too easy to compare the legends from the past to the mediocre or rubbish from today and behave as though they are equally representative of their generation. A top 10 artist from today simply can't represent this vague notion of "modern music", as even within genres there can be so much variety. Likewise a legend from the past shouldn't be held as a representative for all music from that era - there was a lot of trash there too, that gets rather conveniently forgotten behind rose tinted glasses. I've said it before on this forum and i'll say it again - music moves on, taste moves on, and the next generation of musicians and audiences want a soundtrack to their own "glory days", not be stuck re-living someone else's.

The tech has changed, for sure, and I can understand it can be quite overwhelming. I can get lost in sound banks for hours, and sometimes you can find a sound that can be super inspiring for either an atmosphere, a theme or a mood. That can totally trigger a new song idea - at least for me (don't want to speak for anyone else). I personally find it more exciting tbh.
Old 28th June 2020
  #11
Once, after a long argument in the pub, I came to the conclusion that there are 3 reasons to do a band (as a catch all term for music creation beyond the mechanics of playing an instrument for pleasure).

1) to make money
2) to hang out with your mates
3) to create art (a genuine expression of something that transcends it's form)

If you can do one of them, you're doing well. If you can do two? You've won life. All three, and you'll be remembered forever.

I make odd music. I get that it isn't appealing on any commercial level (and is a niche aesthetic) but it's mine. And I try to make it as true to my vision as possible. And, as so, it becomes something like an expressionist painting. The honesty and commitment to its own creation is the goal. Commitment to it's own creation is the point.

So I'm clawing my brain to pieces everyday to try and do 3) and maybe i'm wasting my time. But compromise it failure.

And again: I'm not saying I'm making good music, but I really think it's the only way to do it.

So if your thing is to roll on the floor screaming into a dictaphone. Then do it. Commit to it. Maybe that is the next thing that sets the world alight. If you do it with full commitment of heart and mind, it will transcend criticism.
Old 28th June 2020
  #12
I've been lucky to live in the pre-social media age and was in a band, it IS a very social thing and also going to music college where you're constantly surrounded by talent then when that goes away it can be pretty depressing, the so called 'real' world is full of people who have never had these experiences and they don't understand, I know because I've also for a few years worked in an office, call centres and been a cleaner, you will hardly ever meet musicians in these environments, they are NOT inspiring for a creative mind or musicians and will destroy your soul if you don't get out of it...

I managed to make money, create art and had a blast doing it with my best friends, we had a ball in my 20s as well, the band I was in never made a fortune and we never hit the bigtime, but we had a real following where the same people consitently turned up to all our gigs, it created a culture and hopefully will be remembered by those people.

Work ethic is everything, I was often the driving force and leader in the bands I've been in, you'd better get used to working hard or you've got no chance, look at how hard the beatles and led zeppelin worked to achieve what they did, it didn't come from nowhere, stop feeling sorry for yourself and get on with it, there's no excuse anymore when it comes to making an album, almost everyone has a home studio thesedays, the technology is here now to support us, never been a better time. Also look at how hard founders of companies are willing to work, you won't find anyone normal or an employee with the same levels of work ethic or putting in 18 hour days, hard work is everything, don't listen to anyone who says it isn't, 99% hard work 1% talent.
Old 29th June 2020
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pencilextremist View Post
I've been lucky to live in the pre-social media age and was in a band, it IS a very social thing and also going to music college where you're constantly surrounded by talent then when that goes away it can be pretty depressing, the so called 'real' world is full of people who have never had these experiences and they don't understand, I know because I've also for a few years worked in an office, call centres and been a cleaner, you will hardly ever meet musicians in these environments, they are NOT inspiring for a creative mind or musicians and will destroy your soul if you don't get out of it...

I managed to make money, create art and had a blast doing it with my best friends, we had a ball in my 20s as well, the band I was in never made a fortune and we never hit the bigtime, but we had a real following where the same people consitently turned up to all our gigs, it created a culture and hopefully will be remembered by those people.

Work ethic is everything, I was often the driving force and leader in the bands I've been in, you'd better get used to working hard or you've got no chance, look at how hard the beatles and led zeppelin worked to achieve what they did, it didn't come from nowhere, stop feeling sorry for yourself and get on with it, there's no excuse anymore when it comes to making an album, almost everyone has a home studio thesedays, the technology is here now to support us, never been a better time. Also look at how hard founders of companies are willing to work, you won't find anyone normal or an employee with the same levels of work ethic or putting in 18 hour days, hard work is everything, don't listen to anyone who says it isn't, 99% hard work 1% talent.
Lots of nice insights here, especially your 3rd paragraph. In the 70s I studied traditional recording and production - Neve, Ampex, Scully, Nagra era - and honestly, I did not work hard enough to break into the traditional music business. Studios were centralized and career opportunities highly competitive. I arrived in LA in the late 70s at the start of the industry downturn, and after a few years returned to school for a technology degree. In hindsight this was a wise decision. I landed in a rare "real-world" position that bridged computers with fledgling digital audio design and production workflows for CD-ROM multimedia products.

Since then I've had more time to write and record music, for my own enjoyment and occasionally special projects. I've finally committed to invest in my craft, and am grateful for how affordable and accessible today's audio production technology is compared to the 70s walled gardens. Technology is no longer a bottleneck, just the commitment needed to really excel.

Sky
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