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Are there any books or videos with Trent Reznor talking about his writing process?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Are there any books or videos with Trent Reznor talking about his writing process?

His lyrics always hit me in the core. He is amazing.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 

I believe Pretty Hate Machine is a breakup album. Just a guess though
So there's some inspiration for you.
He definitely is creative with his words, 'Pretty Hate Machine' is a great term for an Ex.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
I believe Pretty Hate Machine is a breakup album. Just a guess though
So there's some inspiration for you.
He definitely is creative with his words, 'Pretty Hate Machine' is a great term for an Ex.
Everyone always talks about his engineering and production. His writing doesn't get enough credit at all.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Gear Nut
Not sure about books or videos, and I haven't found much about lyrics, but I've tried to collect a few articles with hints about his process. Here's what I found:

From EMusician - Raw Power:
Reznor's tools of choice for the [With Teeth] record's writing phase included really nothing more than a Digidesign Pro Tools rig, a microphone and a couple of generic synths. And to jump-start the writing process, he put himself on a strict schedule of trying to finish two songs with vocals every 10 days. “So instead of arranging and tinkering around with sounds, I just narrowed it down to starting with vocals and lyrics and melody,” he explains. “And given the amount of time I had to do these, all self-imposed, I didn't have much time to flesh it out with stuff. And I found at the end of it, I had 25 songs that I thought were pretty good.
One of main tactics for fleshing out song ideas was the use of loop recording. Ross often looped a section of music, and Reznor then either sang or played some other instrument over it, often for as long as an hour. The resulting audio files were then examined for possible inclusion in the finished song.

From Vulture: Trent Reznor, In Conversation
The first album [Pretty Hate Machine] came out of me being in my early 20s when I knew I had something to say but didn’t know what it was.... It wasn’t until I’d been keeping a journal and turning those thoughts into lyrics and setting incredibly painful and naked feelings to music that I stepped out in front as myself. That honesty gave Nine Inch Nails a power that carried through the first few records.

From Rolling Stone:
When I return to the writing process after being away from it for a while, the first part of it always is being honest with myself: What am I into right now? Is it rock bands and guitars, is it noise, is it dance beats and electronics? Is it space, is it clutter? And secondly, when it comes time to put pen to paper and express feelings, who am I right now? What do I, as a forty-seven or forty-eight-year-old man, have to say about anything? It takes time to rediscover that — in my day-to-day normal life I tend to not sit down and really think about how I feel. I’m not in therapy or in an AA meeting.

Reverb Machine deconstructed some of his songs in Trent Reznor Chord Theory.

Supposedly he's a customer of the lyric writing tool MasterWriter, though Trent's rich enough to just buy everything whether he uses it or not.

As far as video, there's the recording of the Mantra jam session in the Sound City documentary:



And more cynically, This Is A Trent Reznor Song:

Old 1 week ago
  #5
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SyneRyder View Post
Not sure about books or videos, and I haven't found much about lyrics, but I've tried to collect a few articles with hints about his process. Here's what I found:

From EMusician - Raw Power:
Reznor's tools of choice for the [With Teeth] record's writing phase included really nothing more than a Digidesign Pro Tools rig, a microphone and a couple of generic synths. And to jump-start the writing process, he put himself on a strict schedule of trying to finish two songs with vocals every 10 days. “So instead of arranging and tinkering around with sounds, I just narrowed it down to starting with vocals and lyrics and melody,” he explains. “And given the amount of time I had to do these, all self-imposed, I didn't have much time to flesh it out with stuff. And I found at the end of it, I had 25 songs that I thought were pretty good.
One of main tactics for fleshing out song ideas was the use of loop recording. Ross often looped a section of music, and Reznor then either sang or played some other instrument over it, often for as long as an hour. The resulting audio files were then examined for possible inclusion in the finished song.

From Vulture: Trent Reznor, In Conversation
The first album [Pretty Hate Machine] came out of me being in my early 20s when I knew I had something to say but didn’t know what it was.... It wasn’t until I’d been keeping a journal and turning those thoughts into lyrics and setting incredibly painful and naked feelings to music that I stepped out in front as myself. That honesty gave Nine Inch Nails a power that carried through the first few records.

From Rolling Stone:
When I return to the writing process after being away from it for a while, the first part of it always is being honest with myself: What am I into right now? Is it rock bands and guitars, is it noise, is it dance beats and electronics? Is it space, is it clutter? And secondly, when it comes time to put pen to paper and express feelings, who am I right now? What do I, as a forty-seven or forty-eight-year-old man, have to say about anything? It takes time to rediscover that — in my day-to-day normal life I tend to not sit down and really think about how I feel. I’m not in therapy or in an AA meeting.

Reverb Machine deconstructed some of his songs in Trent Reznor Chord Theory.

Supposedly he's a customer of the lyric writing tool MasterWriter, though Trent's rich enough to just buy everything whether he uses it or not.

As far as video, there's the recording of the Mantra jam session in the Sound City documentary:



And more cynically, This Is A Trent Reznor Song:

Tbh I don't even think he knows how we comes up with his amazing lyrics. I think it's just who he is. There is no formula.

Dude is special.
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