The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Do lyrics have to rhyme?
Old 30th June 2019
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Do lyrics have to rhyme?

Do these words rhyme? imagine them in a verse.

...smile
...five
...now
...nods
...choice
Old 2nd July 2019
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheguevara93 View Post
Do these words rhyme? imagine them in a verse.

...smile
...five
...now
...nods
...choice
Songs don't have to rhyme. Poems don't have to rhyme.

Rhyme and sound, however, often play a vital role in songs and poems. Many people don't actively listen to lyrics, absorbing them (if at all) osmotically.

Rhyme, repetition, word play, they help make certain parts stand out from the rest, help draw listener attention to the words, potentially help draw the listener into vesting the words with emotional associations to his own life.

Some fine songs don't use rhyme, or use it very subtly. It's a 'powerful' trick, a step 'outside' the literal meaning of the words. Do it clumsily, and it can yank the listener out of the moment -- but done with intelligence and sensitivity, using rhyme and the sound of words against each other can augment and enrich those words and the basic story line.*

* And, by story line, I don't mean plot so much as the emotional 'story' the song is trying tell or the statement/declaration/observation it's trying to make.

And I'll add that artful use of rhyme can be used to augment the relationship of the words with the melody or other musical elements, and even to enhance memorability, 'catchiness,' so to speak.

Last edited by theblue1; 2nd July 2019 at 09:22 PM..
Old 3rd July 2019
  #3
Gear Addict
 

None of the words you have listed rhyme but they certainly could be used for lyrics.

The advantage of using actual rhymes in lyrics is that they tend to create a familiarity or harmony in the listener's ears. They can also be very useful in creating a certain friction with resolutions when you mix near rhymes with perfect rhymes.

Ideally you will want to use near rhymes that are close enough to trick the listeners ears while avoiding perfect rhyme that have become cliches. Pat Pattison at the Berklee College of Music created the term 'family rhymes' to describe rhymes that are very close yet do not rhyme perfectly. These are ideal for lyrics.

A great tool to find these rhymes is Rhyme Genie (http://rhymegenie.com). You can easily adjust the similarity in sound to change the closeness of rhymes or search for family rhyme directly.
Old 3rd July 2019
  #4
Gear Guru
 
Karloff70's Avatar
 

Worry about whether they work, not whether they rhyme.
Old 3rd July 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by J.Good View Post
None of the words you have listed rhyme ...
This is true in the sense of a perfect rhyme, however, there are many different types of rhyme.

The words 'smile' and 'five' rhyme in the sense of assonance (sometimes referred to as a type of 'slant rhyme'), in that the vowel sounds are the same.

Sorry, I'm not trying to be pedantic, I just wanted the op to know there are other ways of rhyming which they may want to look into if they're interested.
Old 3rd July 2019
  #6
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

I guess the answer is... maybe. Most of the Beatles' songs are pretty rhyme-y and they'd sound pretty weird if they weren't, but then there's "She's Leaving Home."
Old 3rd July 2019
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I guess the answer is... maybe. Most of the Beatles' songs are pretty rhyme-y and they'd sound pretty weird if they weren't, but then there's "She's Leaving Home."
I'd say the use of rhyme and slant rhyme is there, but it's not in your standard ABAB or AABB type rhyme schemes. There's also some self-rhyme and repetition. And alliteration (kitchen/handkerchief). I took the liberty of marking up some of it below... but I didn't highlight all the rhyme/alliterative elements.

[Verse 1]
Wednesday morning at five o'clock as the day begins
Silently closing her bedroom door
Leaving the note that she hoped would say more
She goes down the stairs to the kitchen clutching her handkerchief
Quietly turning the backdoor key
Stepping outside, she is free

[Chorus]
She (We gave her most of our lives)
Is leaving (Sacrificed most of our lives)
Home (We gave her everything money could buy)
She's leaving home after living alone (Bye-bye)
For so many years

[Verse 2]
Father snores as his wife gets into her dressing gown
Picks up the letter that's lying there
Standing alone at the top of the stairs
She breaks down and cries to her husband, Daddy, our baby's gone
Why would she treat us so thoughtlessly
How could she do this to me

[Chorus]
She (We never thought of ourselves)
Is leaving (Never a thought for ourselves)
Home (We struggled hard all our lives to get by)
She's leaving home after living alone (Bye-bye)
For so many years
Old 3rd July 2019
  #8
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
I'd say the use of rhyme and slant rhyme is there...
Hafta get pretty slanty to call some of those things rhymes, bub. :-)

And of the actual rhymes, that "motor trade" thing? A placeholder that never got replaced if ever there was one.
Old 4th July 2019
  #9
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by littleeden View Post
The words 'smile' and 'five' rhyme in the sense of assonance (sometimes referred to as a type of 'slant rhyme'), in that the vowel sounds are the same.

Sorry, I'm not trying to be pedantic...
That is actually a good point. Compounding assonance rhymes are widely used by rap artists. They are very effective as double (or more) assonance rhymes that match over multiple syllables.

Single assonance rhymes based on one syllable ('smile'/'five') usually don't catch the listener's ears in a meaningful way.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump