The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Where to go with your music?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Lives for gear
 
mr. torture's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Where to go with your music?

There aren't that many labels anymore, especially for the hard rock / metal crowd. Frontiers music seems to have a monopoly on new / older bands today. They do not accept unsolicited music.

So how do you get your music out there? How does the bedroom composer get a shot?

Sure, I could use Distrokid, or one of the other distribution places and "maybe" get streamed on Spotify or Amazon music. Do you know that there are 4,000,000 songs on Spotify that haven't been streamed once?

I don't have a band, I have a singer/bassist and I do guitars, I use programmed drums and record everything myself. It's not like I can start gigging out or trying to start a following in my small city. Plus at my age, It's just not practical.

So what does everyone do? How do you stand out in a sea of home musicians?
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 
boombapdame's Avatar
What's your age? You should just get your singer/bassist and find a drummer but do not promo yourselves as a band.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
mr. torture's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
What's your age? You should just get your singer/bassist and find a drummer but do not promo yourselves as a band.
I'm 48, little too long in the tooth i'm afraid. Just looking to see what others do in the same situation.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr. torture View Post
So what does everyone do? How do you stand out in a sea of home musicians?
The real answer, no sugar?

You don’t. Not as a non-touring metal act without a band.

Set expectations accordingly. Have fun with the project for whatever joy it brings you, pay the $50ish a year to Tunecore or whoever to digitally distribute your music everywhere, and enjoy interacting with anyone who may respond to what you’re doing.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Nut
 
jugetsu85's Avatar
I doubt that there exists a (market)place for us bedroom producers in the hard rock/metal genre.. all we have is each other.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Here for the gear
 
dedindi's Avatar
I feel that if the music is good it will be heard sooner or later
Old 6 days ago
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
The real answer, no sugar?

You don’t. Not as a non-touring metal act without a band.

Set expectations accordingly. Have fun with the project for whatever joy it brings you, pay the $50ish a year to Tunecore or whoever to digitally distribute your music everywhere, and enjoy interacting with anyone who may respond to what you’re doing.
I think I'd make that $20 a year to Distrokid, myself, particularly given the situation. (I may be prejudiced against Tunecore; I found them quite annoying to deal with and ended up not even using the distribution I'd paid for there.) Tunecore has a lot of add on features that might be useful for some, but they are an expensive way to go compared to Distrokid's flat $20/artist/band yearly fee. But, of course, it's a somewhat no-frills service. But they do keep adding nice features and not raising the rate. (Fingers crossed. )

But as newguy1 suggests, I would concentrate on making the best music I can. And I'd certainly pursue friendly networking with others in my genre, making a list of blogs and other sites (that people actually go to) that accept submissions for review (but don't charge money for review/promo). But keep in mind that bands and fans are all pretty sick of heavy-handed, me-first promo -- the kind that so often backfires and alienates. Be modest, be collegial. Try to legitimately interest yourself in their music or careers.*

Don't be afraid to network with your 'competitor' fellow musicians, either. At this point in a classic genre like rock/metal/folk/jazz/bluetrass/etc, a lot of the enthusiasts of the genre may well be musicians with work of their own to promote. Don't let that put you off. You can find out what avenues are working best, you can form alliances that help their fans find and appreciate you.

Do have fun. And do it for the love of music.


PS... You might also explore ways of using video to promote yourself and your music. We all probably understand the 'dangers' of dorky, amateurish vids that try to mimic the conventions of early MTV or the like -- that only works if it's so dorky its lovable -- but there are simple approaches that can get your music up on Youtube (and all the places that YT vids so often end up in) with at least a modicum of dignity.

* There's an old self-help book from the early 20th century called How to Win Friends and Influence People. It was written by a salesman and he was, out front, trying to help other salesmen. But his tactics largely revolved around the notion that the best way to win friends was to develop a genuine personal interest in and concern for others.
Old 6 days ago
  #8
Lives for gear
 
boombapdame's Avatar
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump