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6" or 8" compact fiberglass walls
Old 16th March 2015
  #1
Gear Addict
 

6" or 8" compact fiberglass walls

Instead of treating the room with fiberglass acoustic treatment;

Why can't a person build 4' wide x 8' tall x 6 or 8" thick compact fiberglass moveable wall. Build 3 of these. Then put one a few feet behind the mix position, one a few feet to the left of the mix position, & one to the right? Maybe take some old cd's or flat plastic and hang it on the panels inside the "U" shaped panel structure around the mix position. Would this work at all? You would be eliminating early reflections imposed in the room without tying up the space in the whole room?

Last edited by rimisrandma; 16th March 2015 at 02:44 AM.. Reason: Syntax
Old 16th March 2015
  #2
That's basically just building very large, heavy, non-portable, cumbersome, potentially permanent versions of typical acoustic treatment. You can do the same thing with a bunch of panels on walls, for example, angling them. There are much better relatively portable solutions out there if you don't want something "permanent". Otherwise, you may as well design and build the room(s) from scratch, IMO.
Old 16th March 2015
  #3
Gear Addict
 

What about in a basement 30x40 foot? Just put desk and monitors in the middle of one basement wall & put the 3 treatment walls around the mix position?
Old 16th March 2015
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by rimisrandma View Post
What about in a basement 30x40 foot? Just put desk and monitors in the middle of one basement wall & put the 3 treatment walls around the mix position?
You could, but that sounds like a waste of space, and the other issues I mention above remain. Will this room only be used for monitoring? Why did you mention the center of the room? That's not necessarily the best place for your monitors, regardless of what's floating around the Internet. I've found many monitors in various rooms benefit from wall/boundary loading, for example. In my room, my monitors sound best about 2 feet or less from any wall, for example. It depends on the room, current treatment, the monitors, your listening preferences, etc.

Finally, you'll probably want to ask this question in the acoustics section.
Old 17th March 2015
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aural Endeavors View Post
You could, but that sounds like a waste of space, and the other issues I mention above remain. Will this room only be used for monitoring? Why did you mention the center of the room? That's not necessarily the best place for your monitors, regardless of what's floating around the Internet. I've found many monitors in various rooms benefit from wall/boundary loading, for example. In my room, my monitors sound best about 2 feet or less from any wall, for example. It depends on the room, current treatment, the monitors, your listening preferences, etc.

Finally, you'll probably want to ask this question in the acoustics section.
Probably would be horrible in a corner because bass would build up in the corner behind your station. Dead center or somewhere in the middle would require additional panels to section rear off.

This would be for software or di based recording.
Old 20th March 2015
  #6
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Additional input?
Old 20th March 2015
  #7
Gear Nut
 

Check out the ASC attack wall.
Old 20th March 2015
  #8
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brucerothwell's Avatar
 

If you are mixing only, you could consider high-quality over-the ear "open" headphones, such as the Sennheiser HD650, or the HD600.

Otherwise, you need to either treat the walls/ceiling, or as eluded to, build gobos around your "working" studio area(s).
Old 20th March 2015
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by rimisrandma View Post
Probably would be horrible in a corner because bass would build up in the corner behind your station. Dead center or somewhere in the middle would require additional panels to section rear off.

This would be for software or di based recording.
Yes, you'll get more bass buildup in corners, which will exaggerate bass response more, and typically create more peaks and dips in other areas.

It sounds like you will be monitoring in that room more than anything else. If I were in your situation with that room, which is a good size, and I wanted to go the DIY route, I'd listen to the monitors near each wall equidistant from the side walls, moving them away from/to the back wall to taste (to achieve the best bass response). Then I'd choose the wall that sounded best and stick with it.

Then I'd treat that wall with self-built 703 6" thick panels, but only near the monitors. Perhaps just beyond the edge of the monitors a maximum of around two feet. Then I'd build stands for the side panels and place them on the sides of the listening position so that my ears aren't hearing first reflections from the side walls. In other words, I'd make a three-sided square around the mix area consisting of panels. I'd also hang the same type of panels from the ceiling above me and in the ceiling corners. The ones above me would leave a gap of around 4 to 6" from the ceiling. Same with the back wall: I'd leave a gap if possible. Then, I'd treat the reflection points on the rear wall with panels (the wall behind me). The whole time, I would be measuring the results with REW to confirm what I was hearing, and to possibly solve remaining issues.

That setup will somewhat mimic the Attack Wall someone mentioned, or my own Mix Station, giving a more intimate and precise image at the engineer's listening position.

If the response is still too uneven below about 250Hz, then I'd treat the corners floor to ceiling with straddled panels or some other corner treatment. Still too uneven? Then I'd tackle the ceiling corners iteratively, starting at bare ceiling corners closest to the mix position. Why? Because the effects of room treatment suffers from proximity, too. You're going to "hear" the treatment more that's closer to your ears (or mic).

If I were good with woodworking tools and was ambitious, I'd build tube traps instead, as they still absorb bass better in free field away from walls, due to having their own integrated air space. In my case, I built my own, which became a commercial product.

Alternatively, you could do as someone else suggested, and mix with high quality phones. But, like everything else, it's a learning experience. I wouldn't expect your mixes to translate from the get-go. You'll likely have to spend quite a bit of time with them to learn them.

Personally, I use both, as well as other systems including my cars. I check my mixes on:

My IEMs (Jerry Harvey JH13s), Focal Spirit Pros, Audeze LCD-X (reference), DT-880, Monitors (Event PSP8 - the passive model), laptop speakers, car stereos, and Mini Jambox.

Last edited by Aural Endeavors; 20th March 2015 at 09:40 PM.. Reason: Spelling/Clarity
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