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Why did your studio close? Recorders, Players & Tape Machines
Old 17th April 2019
  #241
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 7f9cade View Post
I agree. How do we take this new situation and make it business worthy? Make Music Business Worthy Again. Lol
Nope. Make Music Unclonable and Undownloadable Again.

That's the real genie, it's out, game over.
Old 17th April 2019
  #242
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elsapo2001 View Post
When you see small studios with 60k of outboard and charging a small flat fee per song I scratch my head. Why would you spend so much money on equipment to service a customer base who only wants to pay 100 bucks a song.

The smart thing would have been buy the Waves Platinum bundle when its on sale for 128 dollars, a copy of Reaper and then you can go do the 100 bucks a song deal.

I think a lot of people go crazy and overspend on building a studio.

Apollo X interface is another great way to get a small studio on the cheap for live tracking/monitoring and not spending a bundle on outboard, and you work much more efficiently with saved sessions etc.
That's not the smart thing to do, it's the I can make a more decent living doing something else with ease. I won't cheapen what I do by charging crackhead rates. Me running a studio/label was going to be a backup plan. I took a look at the biz in the late 90s and thought that the consolidation of radio, Napster, and the end of real indie label investors and indie labels feeding indie distributors would drastically change the business. I used to dream of owning an SSL room (Nosslyet). But I saw the pie shrinking and I went to college stalling to see how it would play out.

It's a ghost town compared to when labels had real budgets.
Old 17th April 2019
  #243
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
2) Inter net sampling and digital down loads have replaced yesterdays top 40 radio and major label symbiotic gate keepers. Today's CD,LP & Tape sales are less than 10% of the the unit volume sales of 30 years ago. The massive reduction in sales revenue has created a linear steep decrease in recording
project budgets for all levels of the recording industry.
This isn't exactly true though. Total global recorded music revenue for 2018 was 19.1$ billion. That is higher than 30 years ago and is growing faster than it ever has (9.7% growth for 2018).

The copyright lobby (not friends of artists despite what they would have you believe) like to compare to the highest peak of music revenue which hit 25.2$ billion in 1999. What they forget to tell you is that a large part of that peak was people replacing their vinyl collection with CDs. Not only was that not a peak in creativity, originality or musical productivity as much of it was old material being re-released, it was also a unique point in history that will never come back again.

There will never be another format change like the one from vinyl/cassette to CD that will warrant re-releasing all that old material. The majors have tried already with SACD and DVD-A. The paying audience is not buying it (and rightly so IMO). The 1999 peak was an aberration and should not be used as a measuring point for revenue from new original music (which IMO is what is relevant when discussing recording studios).

Add to the above the shift from album sales to single sales and now streaming and that alone should have caused a 60% to 75% drop in revenue (or somewhere around there) as consumers only pay for the tracks they actually want. We never saw that drop which tells me things were never really as bad as some would like to have you believe. (Or at least not for the reasons they give). Just a natural evolution of a market that went from a semi-controlled monopoly to a more segmented market (with new and old players gaining and losing control in different areas).

So what about all the recording studios that are closing you ask? Well that is the thing. Recording studios are closing. Many reasons for that have already been given including the gigantic drop in cost and the so called democratisation of the technology used by these studios. The recording studios of old were a kind of gatekeepers, due to the financial barrier of setting up a studio, that have had their power and control stripped from them due to the advent of cheap and ubiquitous recording technology. Probably even more importantly, musical tastes and styles have moved more towards electronic music production styles and techniques that do not require bands, sessions musicians or recording studios.

So to conclude, there are many reasons for the decline of recording studios but the actual (total) music revenue changes are probably one of the lesser reasons especially as we have seen growth in revenue for the last four years yet studios are still closing...

Alistair
Old 17th April 2019
  #244
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It is important to disaggregate the elements of any sum conclusion such as "Global Music Revenue". I respect Under Tow's position however several well presented studies have been shared recently within this forum that spell out a much different story pursuant to the CD sales record over the past 30 years when isolated. Perhaps Under Tow will be able to share the Global Music Rev. study he is alluding to for clarity purposes that can and will enable an empirical A/B evaluation.
Hugh
Old 17th April 2019
  #245
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Guy owns an expensive box of colored chalk, draws on sidewalks, then walks away, uncompensated.

You going to put up a climate controlled structure over his head, after pulling permits, drawing loans, then pay tax on it, give him a better place to draw... for what?

There isn't a nickle in the whole scenario. There isn't A DREAM of a nickle in the whole scenario. He has no money to pay you now, and knows he won't later. He is NOT going to slave a day job to save up to pay YOU... for a service that makes him NOTHING.

Who DOES pay for music? Right now, today? Long list, short list, immaterial.

There IS money changing hands, and if YOU want to be part of it, you have to place yourself between money givers, and money takers, period.

That will last about 5 seconds, UNLESS you ADD VALUE TO THE EQUATION.

Who HAS the money to spend?

Who can PROVIDE the service or goods the money holder wants to purchase?

What can YOUR GEAR, combined with YOUR EXPERTISE, do to ADD VALUE to those transactions?

YOUR future... depends on YOUR answers.
Old 17th April 2019
  #246
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UnderTow's Avatar
Another thing to consider is the effect of digital globalisation through the internet.

If you are familiar with the Pareto Principle (80/20 rule) you will be aware that in many areas, 80% of the resources/profits/whatever are controlled or received by 20% of the population/companies/whatever. In the case of music, that would mean something like 80% of the gigs ending up with 20% of the bands (or studios or whatever). So far so good.

The problem is that if 30 years ago you were part of the top 20% of your local gigging/recording circuit, you are now competing with a much bigger pool. You are now competing with the top 20% of the world. There is a very good chance that you are now no longer in the top 20%. There is just too much external competition for you to make the cut which means you end up having to share the 20% of gigs left over with 80% of the market. Probably not enough of a steady income to survive. (Especially considering all the other factors affecting the market).

If you can't survive as a gigging band, there probably isn't nearly as much incentive to record yourself either, or hire a rehearsal room or in many other ways contribute to the local "band economy". Of course this doesn't just apply to you. It also applies to most of the other local bands that used to be able to survive. This results in the local music economy that managed to exist before the internet to now collapse in light of global competition.

No one in particular is to blame for the above. It is just a reflection of how the world is changing.

Alistair
Old 17th April 2019
  #247
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
It is important to disaggregate the elements of any sum conclusion such as "Global Music Revenue". I respect Under Tow's position however several well presented studies have been shared recently within this forum that spell out a much different story pursuant to the CD sales record over the past 30 years when isolated. Perhaps Under Tow will be able to share the Global Music Rev. study he is alluding to for clarity purposes that can and will enable an empirical A/B evaluation.
Hugh
When discussing the global market, I always look at the Global Statistics from the IFPI (They are the authority on the subject): Global Statistics — IFPI — Representing the recording industry worldwide

Can you point me to the other studies? I would be very interested in reading them.

Thanks,

Alistair
Old 17th April 2019
  #248
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the next thread coming soon will be titled “why did your tiny home studio close?”
Old 17th April 2019
  #249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 7f9cade View Post
I agree. How do we take this new situation and make it business worthy? Make Music Business Worthy Again. Lol
That's a tough one. Artists are already doing it by embracing the fact that music is basically free; it's the advertisement that gets people out to shows.

All advertisements are free to the public. Yet, advertising agencies are doing very well. That's what studios have become; advertising agencies for musicians.

I hesitate to bring up Steve Albini, but he's a great example of someone who has turned his studio into an "advertising agency" for alternative bands. He tells artists that they are small independent businesses, and then educates them on the importance of having high quality advertisements toward the goal of getting people out to shows; teaching them to do what he did in the 80's, before the digital age even became an issue. Of course, most studio owners did not engineer an album that inspired a generation to pick up guitars and write angst music. Most have to build from ground level.

Studios are surviving for a wide variety of reason today. I suppose if I wanted to start today, I'd begin by benchmarking the living crap out of every successful studio to find out how they remain in business. Water seeks its own level, and there's little that engineers/owners can do to significantly alter the environment. Therefore, study the environment and learn to live in it. There's no single answer.

I did this in the early 2000's, and decided that I could remain in a studio environment filled with cool gear by hitching my wagon to education. And it's worked out amazingly well. Every day, I go to work and create/record music with an enthusiastic group of young people. Isn't that what what engineers and artists want to do? Work in the studio every day creating music with creative artists? And I don't have to sweat marketing this studio every day. The university takes care of most of that.

But that's one answer, for an individual. Studios have gone all vintage analog and sold that slant. They have moved into sound design for film, built reputations in VO, pursued the worship market, etc... You really do have to look at what is successful and find your niche.

And just as important, study why studios fail, and avoid those pitfalls. The build it and they will come era is over, never to return. When there is no more oxygen in the earth's atmosphere, creatures who breath carbon monoxide with thrive and take over.
Old 17th April 2019
  #250
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Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
lol i had an over 40 year run and I'm not a musician..I give creative input..also I did R&B music mainly and that genre is still around by 1998 many studios had closed or were on the gas pipe
Fair enough, by no means are my posts here intended as an insult to anyone, or to insinuate that someone hasn't earned it or anything like that. More so I think it might be worthwhile to reflect on what IS working more-so in todays world.

IOW- There always has, and as best as I can tell, always will be, money to be made if you can connect with people who sing (or rap, or perform otherwise) and are looking to have records made- or their parents. In the past that producer had to hire a bunch of people and rent a studio, where now they can do most, if not all of it in their own space. If one day with some session cats is needed, it is still a lot less than in the past.

That may seem like a dumbing down of things, but I don't really think it is...Right now Tony Maserati and his team are mixing 5 songs that I cowrote/produced. So far their mixes are going in a slightly different direction, but the ones I did were also perfectly commercially viable. Don't get me wrong, I'm excited and I'm sure the finals will be great- but it's not like what we had wasn't *industry standard* and this step is needed to make it viable. More of an opportunity to get more ears on it, make some space on the publishing for addition production, and gain access to a larger network...

I've been doing music full time (gigging+studio/writing) for 20 years- certainly not as much experience as you have, but also not a newb who hasn't realized that you can't raise a family on ramen in the back of a van!

In any case there is a lot of bitterness in this thread and I think a lot of it is misplaced. There are still tons of great musicians out there, I'm a music director at a COGIC church- we went to Nashville last year for a Gospel Heritage event- holy smokes there were some PLAYERS. I was more there to learn on that trip (first time), but being someone who can hang as a musician and understands the music on that level, puts me in a great position to grow my business in that direction at some point. That same avenue would be much more difficult for someone who isn't a fairly high level musician as well...Even for just taking on projects as a mixer.

IE If another engineer and I are there pitching mixing services- I not only play the music, but also Rodney Jerkins was there and I've done a project with an artist signed to DarkChild. If I'm there with a booth offering mixing services- it's just a fact of life that my experience and network as a player/writer/producer is going to help with work as an engineer.

In any case I mostly wanted to chime in because I love to work with great teams- I'd love to work on a project with you Mike! There seems to be a sentiment in this thread that people like myself smugly do subpar work all by ourselves, thinking that nobody else could add to it and I don't think thats true.

That's a bit of a ramble there...apologies for that!
Old 17th April 2019
  #251
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
FYI Temple University is building a "Sigma" studio at their school
Ironically, one financially viable option would have been to put a school inside of Sigma instead of the other way around...
Old 17th April 2019
  #252
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Sigma's Avatar
I know before sigma it was the famed reco art studio.a lot of history
Old 17th April 2019
  #253
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanC View Post
Fair enough, by no means are my posts here intended as an insult to anyone, or to insinuate that someone hasn't earned it or anything like that. More so I think it might be worthwhile to reflect on what IS working more-so in todays world.

IOW- There always has, and as best as I can tell, always will be, money to be made if you can connect with people who sing (or rap, or perform otherwise) and are looking to have records made- or their parents. In the past that producer had to hire a bunch of people and rent a studio, where now they can do most, if not all of it in their own space. If one day with some session cats is needed, it is still a lot less than in the past.

That may seem like a dumbing down of things, but I don't really think it is...Right now Tony Maserati and his team are mixing 5 songs that I cowrote/produced. So far their mixes are going in a slightly different direction, but the ones I did were also perfectly commercially viable. Don't get me wrong, I'm excited and I'm sure the finals will be great- but it's not like what we had wasn't *industry standard* and this step is needed to make it viable. More of an opportunity to get more ears on it, make some space on the publishing for addition production, and gain access to a larger network...

I've been doing music full time (gigging+studio/writing) for 20 years- certainly not as much experience as you have, but also not a newb who hasn't realized that you can't raise a family on ramen in the back of a van!

In any case there is a lot of bitterness in this thread and I think a lot of it is misplaced. There are still tons of great musicians out there, I'm a music director at a COGIC church- we went to Nashville last year for a Gospel Heritage event- holy smokes there were some PLAYERS. I was more there to learn on that trip (first time), but being someone who can hang as a musician and understands the music on that level, puts me in a great position to grow my business in that direction at some point. That same avenue would be much more difficult for someone who isn't a fairly high level musician as well...Even for just taking on projects as a mixer.

IE If another engineer and I are there pitching mixing services- I not only play the music, but also Rodney Jerkins was there and I've done a project with an artist signed to DarkChild. If I'm there with a booth offering mixing services- it's just a fact of life that my experience and network as a player/writer/producer is going to help with work as an engineer.

In any case I mostly wanted to chime in because I love to work with great teams- I'd love to work on a project with you Mike! There seems to be a sentiment in this thread that people like myself smugly do subpar work all by ourselves, thinking that nobody else could add to it and I don't think thats true.

That's a bit of a ramble there...apologies for that!
. Love to work with you BTW Rodney jerkins was pretty much an AH we we're doing Patti LaBelle and his crew came to sigma..i was chief engineer and also doing Patti's stuff for another producer...first thing outta his mouth was " what a 1 inch tape machine ????I thought this was a big studio..lol it was 185 k dollars X850..then he goes " I don't want to work on this old board I wanna work on the SSL downstairs..lol the board he wanted to work on was a crap Mitsubishi superstar..the board he didn't want to work on was a custom 8078..he also stole a song from a young songwriter I knew who sued him..lol to me he's part of the problem..a producer who thought he knew engineering...and dissed our studio in front of Patti who thought he was..uhh less than knowledgeable also Tony B is a great guy he used to be an assistant at our NYC studio..that's where he got his real start..I can recite that Rodney story vebatium because I use it all the time when I speak of people who because they think they are good at 1 thing in music production..thinks that carries over to other things.
He made a fool out of himself.

Last edited by Sigma; 17th April 2019 at 04:00 PM..
Old 17th April 2019
  #254
Whatever is going on regarding the value of music in today's culture, I doubt it is music per se that is being devalued.

Live music seems to continue to have significant value. FOH recently reported that touring revenues set records for both total gross ($10.4 billion) and ticket sales (152.1 million).
Old 17th April 2019
  #255
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildplum View Post
Whatever is going on regarding the value of music in today's culture, I doubt it is music per se that is being devalued.

Live music seems to continue to have significant value. FOH recently reported that touring revenues set records for both total gross ($10.4 billion) and ticket sales (152.1 million).
Yeah, but you're talking about established artists. Now the young acts have to split venues with about 5 other bands each playing about 30-45 minutes each, and pay for their own ticket sales. Streaming revenue amounts to about nothing to the artists.

The ironic thing is MUSIC IS valuable. It always has been and it always will be. The issue is the turning revenue away from the artists who have created the music.
Old 17th April 2019
  #256
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henryrobinett View Post
The ironic thing is MUSIC IS valuable. It always has been and it always will be.
And the question is to define "valuable." Yes, it's massively valuable emotionally. People love music. They listen to it everyday. Many people need music.

But recorded music has lost its financial value, except as advertising element toward the proliferation of peripheral activities. Recorded music is free.

Many younger people I know don't even go to concerts to hear the music. They go to be part of the scene, and to ward off unhipness.

Last week, I asked a class what's the latest thing, and they said... cowboy rap. Cowboy rap? I asked why they like it, and they were unanimous and transparent in the reason of needing to know what's the latest thing and be part of the scene when the buckeroo-rap-star hip hops his pony into town and hitches up at the local amphitheater.

They look at me like, "What's up with you unhip, old-fart." The music sucks, of course. But what an advertisement toward the staging of money-making live events where the hip can congregate and be seen being hip. And T sales, of course.
Old 17th April 2019
  #257
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro View Post
And the question is to define "valuable." Yes, it's massively valuable emotionally. People love music. They listen to it everyday. Many people need music.

But recorded music has lost its financial value, except as advertising element toward the proliferation of peripheral activities. Recorded music is free.

Many younger people I know don't even go to concerts to hear the music. They go to be part of the scene, and to ward off unhipness.

Last week, I asked a class what's the latest thing, and they said... cowboy rap. Cowboy rap? I asked why they like it, and they were unanimous and transparent in the reason of needing to know what's the latest thing and be part of the scene when the buckeroo-rap-star hip hops his pony into town and hitches up at the local amphitheater.

They look at me like, "What's up with you unhip, old-fart." The music sucks, of course. But what an advertisement toward the staging of money-making live events where the hip can congregate and be seen being hip. And T sales, of course.
They don't enjoy the concerts because many are busy trying to stream the concert with their phones. In order to make sure they can see it later, they don't watch it live.
Old 17th April 2019
  #258
Deleted 7f9cade
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro View Post
Last week, I asked a class what's the latest thing, and they said... cowboy rap.
Ha. The existence of a genre named "Cowboy Rap" makes it seem like the top guys who are still writing pop songs are just throwing darts.

I have not listened to any though, so I guess I can't knock it until Ive tried.
Old 17th April 2019
  #259
Deleted 7f9cade
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Another thing I'd like to add to this discussion is a recent article I read about using blockchain systems to start monetizing music across the internet.

Im not that well read on the blockchain system. Im still trying to understand how it can work for music. Maybe someone on here will a better understanding of how blockchain works can weigh in.


Can Blockchain Technology Disrupt the Music Industry?
Old 17th April 2019
  #260
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This is the IFPL report of 2018 disaggregated:
1) 25%, physical units (CDs declined by 10.1%) (Vinyl up 6% to 3.6% of total)
2) 12% Digital (excluding streaming)
3) 47% Streaming (34% increase)
4) 14% Performance rights
2) 2% Sync. Rev

These are world (58 countries) statistics and clearly indicate the overwhelming (apx.60%) dominance of the digital sales revenue in the recording global market. CD sales declined 10.1% in the global market with Europe and the Pacific Rim countries accounting for much better CD sales than the USA market.
In my post #205 this is exactly the overall market condition that I described and it is a major factor in any forensic evaluation of major label budgets to support big dollar studios.
We have an extremely fractionalized recording industry that will never return to yesterdays protocol but there is still a voracious appetite for recording purchases world wide. The choice is ours to either drown in despair over the demise of yesterdays obsolete business model, or to seek a niche in the new paradigm.
Hugh
Old 17th April 2019
  #261
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ienjoyaudio View Post
Ha. The existence of a genre named "Cowboy Rap" makes it seem like the top guys who are still writing pop songs are just throwing darts.

I have not listened to any though, so I guess I can't knock it until Ive tried.
Yeah, throwing darts and hitting target markets, bullseye.
Old 18th April 2019
  #263
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UnderTow's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
This is the IFPL report of 2018 disaggregated:
1) 25%, physical units (CDs declined by 10.1%) (Vinyl up 6% to 3.6% of total)
2) 12% Digital (excluding streaming)
3) 47% Streaming (34% increase)
4) 14% Performance rights
2) 2% Sync. Rev

These are world (58 countries) statistics and clearly indicate the overwhelming (apx.60%) dominance of the digital sales revenue in the recording global market. CD sales declined 10.1% in the global market with Europe and the Pacific Rim countries accounting for much better CD sales than the USA market.
In my post #205 this is exactly the overall market condition that I described and it is a major factor in any forensic evaluation of major label budgets to support big dollar studios.
We have an extremely fractionalized recording industry that will never return to yesterdays protocol but there is still a voracious appetite for recording purchases world wide. The choice is ours to either drown in despair over the demise of yesterdays obsolete business model, or to seek a niche in the new paradigm.
Hugh
Hi Hugh,

Yes indeed, the revenue streams have shifted from being predominantly based on selling physical media to streaming. By only mentioning the revenue from physical media sales in your previous post I got the impression that you were suggesting that revenue had dropped to 10% of what it was 30 years ago. That of course is not accurate. Revenue from recorded music is higher today than 30 years ago.

I agreed with the other points in your post but I am not clear on how you see the shift in revenue streams affecting studios. How do you think this shift from physical media to streaming affects a recording studio? Assuming a "record" produces as much revenue either way, how would you say this affects the recording studio as a service provider?

Thanks,

Alistair
Old 18th April 2019
  #264
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Just curious, does anyone know for SURE how much someone like amazon gets out of the $.99 download?
Old 18th April 2019
  #265
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nosebleedaudio View Post
Just curious, does anyone know for SURE how much someone like amazon gets out of the $.99 download?
A quote from the Ditto Music website: "The retail price of your digital release is at Amazon’s discretion. The wholesale price is based on tiers, but you’ll typical take around 60% of Amazon’s retail price. For its Prime streaming service, you’ll take a proportionate share of the platform’s revenue."

Alistair
Old 18th April 2019
  #266
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Hello Nosebleedaudio, Digital downloads with CD baby renders apx. 70% of revenue to project owner and Lyric writer: this is a powerful incentive for independent project studio activity that essentially puts the artist in total control of production and revenue mgt. with very small financial exposure.

Alistair, IMO the demise of big dollar studios is not attributable to any single event but a combination of factors that are loosely related. In my post #205 I outlined the three primary factors I consider the most responsible. This is my subjective assessment as an owner and operator of a specialized project studio for the past 20 years. For the record, the first 30 years I spent dealing with labor intensive analog processing, record labels, restricted radio play, big dollar commercial studios and other industry lock down gate keepers: so the last 20 years have been somewhat like getting out of Jail!
Hugh
Old 18th April 2019
  #267
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
.I can recite that Rodney story vebatium because I use it all the time when I speak of people who because they think they are good at 1 thing in music production..thinks that carries over to other things.
He made a fool out of himself.
That's a funny storey and the little bit that I've talked to him that doesn't suprise me at all. Rodney is neither here to there to me, and my post comes across more name dropping then I intended...My point is merely in the network=networth dept.

From how I read these threads, and I could be wrong, is that studio business used to be more insulated from 'the hussle' than it is now. Maybe back in the day you could have quality rooms, gear and engineers and that was enough.

Now we're in the mix of 'the hustle' as much as anyone else- and as someone who has been on both sides of the glass, that doesn't seem that unfair to me. It merely puts us in more similar situation to everyone else in the entertainment biz.
Old 18th April 2019
  #268
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ienjoyaudio View Post
Ha. The existence of a genre named "Cowboy Rap" makes it seem like the top guys who are still writing pop songs are just throwing darts.

I have not listened to any though, so I guess I can't knock it until Ive tried.

Apparently this has been in existence for some time now. Just last night I watched the first two episodes of the FX show "Justified" and the theme song is "cowboy rap". That first season premiered in 2010 if I'm not mistaken. I'd never heard anything like it before. Rapping over country/Appalachian Bluegrass...hmmmm. Very strange mixture if you ask me.

Last edited by Funny Cat; 18th April 2019 at 03:38 PM.. Reason: spelling correction
Old 18th April 2019
  #269
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Originally Posted by Funny Cat View Post
Apparently this has been in existence for some time now.
Rural American kids have been into rap ever since Eminem dropped...Also acts like Florida Georgia Line have been doing this for years, but just a little more on the country/pop side.

Old 18th April 2019
  #270
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanC View Post
I'm curious how many of the doom-and-gloomers here are in strictly older rock styles or other styles that have faded from the limelight?

Don't mean any offense there, but it seems like a big part of this has to do with the DAWS and changes in the industry that have been mentioned, and part has to do with some being inflexible with ever-evolving musical styles?

Things have been pretty good here, but I got started in the late 90's so I was never around when things were better...During my career I think it's really strange if someone want's to engineer and isn't a musician, can play, write, has been on both sides of the glass and can offer more than just engineering.

Certainly other industries pay better! I'm not arguing that point. But I think with a varied skillset and an open mind the modern music industry is navigable.

I'd like to parse this train of thought a little if you don't mind. I'm really trying to understand what you mean when you say it has to do with "being inflexible"? I mean, I can't really see any studio owner getting calls from Rap or modern Pop artists etc. and saying "no I don't do those". Maybe it happens? I just can't imagine it though.

I just opened shop here and in my limited experience the rap artists are the most disorganized and flaky of them all. I would say about 50% of the rappers who book me wind up cancelling the day before the session. The ones who do show up usually come late.

Just the other day I did a rap session and the guy texts me 10 minutes before the session saying "hey, something came up and I'm running late. I will be there in about an hour and a half." :0/ On top of that they are usually only booking a couple hours at most and many try to book one hour but I have a two hour minimum.

I just can't see most of these modern styles of music sustaining a studio business with that type of work ethic and the little hours they actually need in a studio. Pop artists are fairly similar as far as how much time they usually need in the studio since most of their music is pre-programmed electronic music. Good Pop vocals can be done on an apollo twin in a living room to be completely honest so they don't really need studios.

In your situation, I understand you do a lot of writing and production so in that regard I understand how that would allow you to focus on those styles. I have a good AE friend who is also a fantastic R&B producer...plays keys and saxophone and many of the gigs he gets are through his collaborations and not strictly artists cold calling. From that perspective I definitely see the advantage of being a musician/producer as well as studio owner. So we agree there for sure!
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