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Perfect Pitch Training Tutorial
Old 1st December 2006
  #1
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Thread Starter
Perfect Pitch Training Tutorial

I've seen these courses advertised in Keyboard mag for ages. Just wondering if anyone has tried them and if they work. Any info appreciated!!
Old 1st December 2006
  #2
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A friend of mine had them and I tried listening to them a bit... they made me sleepy. Seems like a lot more work than what is advertised. I guess it could work if you really stick with it. I might give it another shot at some point.
---
c
Old 1st December 2006
  #3
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Training? I dunno, maybe. Personally I think you have it or you don't..
Old 1st December 2006
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
Training? I dunno, maybe. Personally I think you have it or you don't..
thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
Both Pitch & Meter!!
Old 1st December 2006
  #5
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Thread Starter
My goal isn't to have perfect pitch, it is to improve my ear. Just wondering if anyone has gotten anything positive out of these things.
Old 1st December 2006
  #6
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confooshus's Avatar
 

I don't know why you'd even want it... I think it would drive me crazy.
Old 1st December 2006
  #7
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Sounds Great's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by confooshus View Post
I don't know why you'd even want it... I think it would drive me crazy.
Nah, only when listening to Ashley Simpson.
Old 1st December 2006
  #8
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IME,

I'm one of the fortunate (or unfortunate, depending on the situation!) folks with perfect pitch. I have known a few people who developed very good relative pitch, and some bordering on nearly perfect pitch. They did not take the course you mentioned, merely honed their already keen ear into very discerning ears.

One thing that was mentioned to me (via one keen-eared and hard working individual) was to try to work at memorizing one note: if you're a guitar player, memorize A (440) or a violinist memorize the A, or another open string, if you're male, and can at least sing half-assed, know your highest note before falsetto - yes this is hard, esp. when you have a cold/early AM, etc., etc., but - keep at it daily, and you'll hopefully begin to recognize the pitches from the way they resonate in your head/ears. Once you have that, through interval studies you can determine other pitches against what pitch you already know...

Nothing too scientific about this, but it DOES take a lot of focussed training - it's not something you can expect to fall in your lap - everyone I've talked with about this claims they worked endlessly on it, and in the end - results!

Best with it,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopamine View Post
I've seen these courses advertised in Keyboard mag for ages. Just wondering if anyone has tried them and if they work. Any info appreciated!!
Old 1st December 2006
  #9
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead View Post
If you're male, and can at least sing half-assed, know your highest note before falsetto - yes this is hard, esp. when you have a cold/early AM, etc., etc., but - keep at it daily, and you'll hopefully begin to recognize the pitches from the way they resonate in your head/ears. Once you have that, through interval studies you can determine other pitches against what pitch you already know...
Cool suggestion! FWIW, I was tuning a gtr yesterday and noticed my pitch discernment was rusty. That's what made me think about this. It's probably because I haven't played (keys, my main instrument) in a while.
Old 1st December 2006
  #10
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max cooper's Avatar
 

I'm getting to the point where I can write charts from a recording without having an instrument in front of me.

it's definitely learned in my case.

Maybe it's a form of synesthesia because I definitely associate colors with pitch.
Old 1st December 2006
  #11
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hey max your color association is definately a sign of synesthesia. I know a few people with perfect pitch and they all claim to see colors with pitch.

"perfect pitch" is definately something that you are born with...like others have said...you either got it or you don't

No tutorial nor practice can give you perfect pitch, in it's truest sense. People with perfect pitch can hear a pitch and say thats an Ab, or that's a G. And then you say sing an Eb and they hit it. Those people are few and far between.

But you can definately practice to have very very good relative pitch. You gotta practice hearing our intervals, and chordal progressions.

May times I can hear distinct chords on guitars. Mostly open chords because they have very distinct sounds.

You can also make yourself hear intervals both in single notes an chordally. And you can make yourself know when something is slightly sharp or flat.

That's all practice and I was stringed instrument player for a while... Then I started playing keys, namely piano and my ear developed the most after I picked up the piano... But it took a good 5 years of consistent music playing to develop my ear to the point it is today... At this point, I don't think my ear will get nay better, and i wont hear pitch any more perfectly
Old 1st December 2006
  #12
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Sounds Great's Avatar
 

Hey! Sorry if i'm a little off...

Just got back from singing at the bar...



Fun, I never sang 4 songs befcore. Ended with "Breakdown" heh

Brought down the house. yeah, rigggght. heh

And no autootune. . dfegad
Old 1st December 2006
  #13
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abit's Avatar
 

U don't need ppitch to be a solid professional musician.
True - or U have it or not.
But I knew guys with a ppich who couldn't sing in pitch.

They were really terrible.
But some of them were great musicians.

Don't waste your time and money for this scamy book or what ever it is.
It the same thing if you'll buy a book how to make money with real estate.
heh

What U really need is to learn harmony, scales, theory, and develop a really good relative pitch as mentioned above.
And how to develop this skills is anothers story.


PS A lot of very well known musicians, artists had/have no any idea how to read or write music.
I think It doesn't mean ppl don't have to learn.
Old 1st December 2006
  #14
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Another thought...

An indispensible tool you can carry around everywhere (cept maybe on flights - they might think it's a weapon/terrorist tool!!!) is a tuning fork.

Get used to striking it and constantly listening to A 440 (or 441/etc. depending on what is your ref.) and this also helps to ingrain (a certain) pitch, and you might eventually learn it without an instrument to constantly reference pitches.

PS - don't listen to the naysayers - you never know until you try!

Perfect pitch is both a blessing and a curse: it has helped me innumerable times from lifting licks/chord progressions (without the help of an instrument I might add!!!) to writing charts, to blah, blah, blah...

It has also killed my enjoyment of participating/listening to various moments throughout my career - as well makes it near impossible to sight-transpose charts (as I "hear" what I "see") but - all in all - a VERY valuable tool in being able to expedite many, many things in ALL music related tasks...

YMMV, but only if you HAVE perfect pitch, other than that, only your opinion may vary...
Old 1st December 2006
  #15
Gear Maniac
Perfect pitch=Nolan Ryan

I'm really not to convinced that this is something inherent or a gift one is born with. Many years ago, I was taking a jazz improv course in college. We did interval drills until they were coming out of our ears. The prof taught us to memorize A 440 and identify any other note via intervals. This has helped me many times over the years.
Old 1st December 2006
  #16
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DAWgEAR's Avatar
 

You're talking about the David L. Burge ear training courses that, at one point, were in all the magazines?

The one most commonly advertised is the Perfect Pitch course, but there is also a Relative Pitch Course. See his website, eartraining dot com.

The relative pitch course is fantastic and equivalent to a year or so of serious college-level study. He claims it can be completed in 90 days -- don't feel bad if it takes you a year or longer! I own most of the eartraing courses and software and there is nothing else like it in terms of its depth, thoroughness, and integration with theory. A bit pricy, but very, very, highly recommended! If you are serious about developing relative pitch, it is a no-brainer.

The perfect pitch course? I've owned it for a decade, and I still do not have perfect pitch. Good course if it did what it claims, but IMHO, it's a novelty. Not recommended except for entertainment and amusement.

Also very highly recommended for relative pitch development (and a very different but complementary approach to Burge) are Bruce Arnold's (Muse Eek) courses.
Old 1st December 2006
  #17
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DeepSpace's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by abit View Post
U don't need ppitch to be a solid professional musician.
Relative pitch is where it's at.
Old 1st December 2006
  #18
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DAWgEAR's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead View Post
An indispensible tool you can carry around everywhere (cept maybe on flights - they might think it's a weapon/terrorist tool!!!) is a tuning fork.
A Kratt chromatic pitch pipe. Fits in your pocket. I carried one everywhere and used it while driving on my long commute for a few years. Got the idea from one of Carl Verheyen's columns. Between the courses I mentioned above and this device, my relative pitch greatly improved.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/produ...0&src=3SOSWXXA

Can be found at most music stores.
Old 1st December 2006
  #19
WDG
Gear Head
 

I don't have perfect pitch but people who don't sing on key or pitch drive me batty. The worst problem I am having right now is that I have an 8 month old son and people are getting him electronic toys that have people singing off pitch and a toy that plays simple songs that breaks meter. You know it's kind of like playing with people who break meter then you start to do the same. I am worried that hearing this is going to mess me up.
Old 1st December 2006
  #20
Gear Addict
 

tried the course - was ok - had minor results

I tried that perfect pitch course many years ago. It was interesting, explaining how different pitches are different colors, and how each of the different keys have a different effect because of the color. As I recall, F# was explained to be the strongest color. It went on to explain how transposing keys results in not just a pitch change, but a color change, and that that's why some keys work and other don't for some songs. I have (perhaps psychologically) noticed this effect.

The course also talks about memorizing a pitch. I'm able to do this now for the most part, but I'm not perfectly reliable, sometimes missing by a half step.

I was never really able to accomplish perfect pitch, but maybe I gave up too early. I might try again if I get the time, but for now I'd rather practice my guitar, which I don't do enough as it is.
Old 27th April 2016
  #21
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This could be very useful for identifying keys or possible melodies of a song you hear. I always just mess around on the keyboard to flesh out notes. That would be impressive for someone to tell you the notes just by listening to some music. Can anyone here do this?
Old 28th April 2016
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
Nah, only when listening to Ashley Simpson.
Or if you play any equal temperament tuned instruments.
Old 28th April 2016
  #23
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I love Necro threads!

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisp2u View Post
Seems like a lot more work than what is advertised.
As is anything. This should not be an excuse. I'd be curious to know how much better you are 10 years later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by numrologst View Post

"perfect pitch" is definately something that you are born with...like others have said...you either got it or you don't
Correct. But take away this programs name and it becomes a great ear training tool.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rids View Post
That would be impressive for someone to tell you the notes just by listening to some music. Can anyone here do this?
I know lots of guys (and gals) who can do this. It's just having a good ear and relative pitch. you don't need perfect pitch to do that.

I have only met 2 people in my life with Perfect Pitch, it really is something spectacular. Best part? One of them's favourite band is Nickelback haha

In terms of the course, I have an old co-worker who used this program and still references is it, he said it was a HUGE step in developing his ear (he's now also a registered piano tuner).
Old 28th April 2016
  #24
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Come on, don't you want to be like this guy:
Attached Thumbnails
Perfect Pitch Training Tutorial-index.jpg  
Old 28th April 2016
  #25
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Nah, but perfect pitch is just a parlor trick. It's not perfect at all, it's simply the memory of a past pitch. In studies, they found changing the reference/concert pitch of a song changes that of people with "perfect pitch". I guess this makes sense, because pitch is relative itself, and people with PP can't determine frequency. So it's based on 440 equal temperament. It doesn't make you any better of a musician than someone with "perfect" relative pitch. And apparently it gives you a demonic blank stare and a creepy smile.
Old 28th April 2016
  #26
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Old 28th April 2016
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KamandaSD View Post
I love Necro threads!

As is anything. This should not be an excuse. I'd be curious to know how much better you are 10 years later.
Ha... well, it's been ~9 1/2 years since that post and I never really went back to it. I've always had pretty good relative pitch... was mostly curious if I could develop it further. For me, it hasn't been worth investing the time in, so I haven't.

Wasn't really making an excuse... it was more a comment on their marketing of it. They make it appear a lot easier than it sounds (no pun intended)... like it's some kind of instant breakthrough if you use their program, as evidenced by testimonials like this... "After just a few minutes of your instructions, I could locate an F# by ear — even when it was hidden in a group of several tones!"

Certainly the effectiveness/outcome depends on the individual, but as with pretty much anything in life, and should be expected with such things, you'll get out of it only as much as you put into it.
---
c
Old 28th April 2016
  #28
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soundebler's Avatar
The phrase perfect pitch is not the same as simply recognizing what note is played , where i live perfect pitch mean recognizing of pitch ,for example if A 440 is real 440 and not 439 . Never met a person that could do this without reference point, pitch fork or computer, think a singer could get very close but they often need a reference point from time to time
Old 28th April 2016
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopamine View Post
I've seen these courses advertised in Keyboard mag for ages. Just wondering if anyone has tried them and if they work. Any info appreciated!!
OK I'll save you a lot of pain.

You won't develop perfect pitch, you either have perfect pitch or you don't.
It's not a thing you develop, people with perfect pitch have a built in pitch reference, it's a bizarre phenomena to those that don't have it.

Roughly 1 in 10,000 people have perfect pitch, so it's fairly rare.

Perfect pitch is not even remotely necessary to be a great musician, so you can relax on that front.

What you want and can achieve is fantastic relative pitch and the ability to recognise, scales, chords and intervals.

Get an ear training app or teacher to teach you how to recognise and recall all the intervals, then scales, then simple chords then complex chords.

I have 20/20 vision when it comes to music, I can sing every scale, chord pattern (arpeggios of course) and recognise all the intervals and recall them instantly.

I don't have perfect pitch, and never will .... and don't even remotely care :-)
Old 28th April 2016
  #30
I'm working my way through David's course now. It has nothing to do with color association, it's just training your ears to be sensitive enough to hear the differences in the way frequencies sound. It is like color though in the sense that as soon as you are born people start telling you what is green, what is blue, etc. So you are constantly training your eyes/brain to associate those light frequencies ranges to certain colors.

With hearing it's very similar in the sense that an A at 440 has subtle things about it your ear can be trained to pick out and once you do this it's not something you can lose. So 220, 110, all have that same characteristic as A at 440 does. One example he uses is how G sounds so twangy, that is a type of characteristic almost everyone hears without any training.

It's not something you have to be born with.

It's not something that will drive you crazy.

I'm only on the second CD and I have a much easier time singing melodies to chords, the notes stick out much better.

It's hard work though and a lot of work, not something you will fly through. For example one of my excersises now is to play 2nds or minor 2nds, the two notes together and sing the notes, bottom to top without playing them individually.
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