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What Console Was this Album Recorded On?
Old 25th August 2014
  #31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ephi82 View Post
I happen to think that there is a significant difference in the recorded "texture" or sonic imprint of the Abbey Road recording from all their others and suspect that the new board had something to do with it. (Plus 8 track recorders)

From my perspective, the songs and the musical complexity of the Beatles as writers and musicians was incredibly changeable from the beginning through Sgt Pepper and much of White Album, but the use of 8 track machines and the transistorized board used on Abbey Road left a tangible sonic imprint.

From what I have read in "Recording the Beatles" there is not a radical change in mic placement and use of dynamic control and efx between Sgt Pepper and Abbey Road. Abbey Road has a "sound" that is truly distinct from all that came before.
I agree with the last sentence. And I, personally, like the 'sound' of the Redd console recorded albums more than I like the 'sound' of Abbey Road. ...but please don't confuse this with "Abbey Road is arguably one of the best Beatle albums." It is! It ranks as the 3rd most fav Beatle album for me! (After Sgt Pepper and Rubber Soul), and I grew up listening to those cats. Again, I'm talking about sonic texture that is inherent with certain electronic circuits- not songwriting, singing, producing, engineering, on and on.
Old 25th August 2014
  #32
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Sharp11's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacalait View Post
I agree with the last sentence. And I, personally, like the 'sound' of the Redd console recorded albums more than I like the 'sound' of Abbey Road. ...but please don't confuse this with "Abbey Road is arguably one of the best Beatle albums." It is! It ranks as the 3rd most fav Beatle album for me! (After Sgt Pepper and Rubber Soul), and I grew up listening to those cats. Again, I'm talking about sonic texture that is inherent with certain electronic circuits- not songwriting, singing, producing, engineering, on and on.
The mistake is assuming the sound has everything to do with the board and not the fact that it was done with completely different drums, guitars, bass, amplifiers and the benefit of several more years of musical and stylistic and developmental changes common industry-wide between the early to mid 60's period, and the much more experimental and precise practices of 1969 into the 70's.

It's an apples to oranges comparison - you can't tell which "sonic texture that is inherent with certain electronic circuits" when nothing at all is carried over from the earlier sessions to the later sessions.
Old 25th August 2014
  #33
Quote:
Originally Posted by salomonander View Post
you did a great job on trouble in paradise!
Mark does a great job on all his recordings...and there are many ones! His work on the Beach Boys alone is a study in efforts to be historically accurate as well.


Best-
Jonathan
Old 25th August 2014
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ephi82 View Post
I happen to think that there is a significant difference in the recorded "texture" or sonic imprint of the Abbey Road recording from all their others and suspect that the new board had something to do with it. (Plus 8 track recorders)

From my perspective, the songs and the musical complexity of the Beatles as writers and musicians was incredibly changeable from the beginning through Sgt Pepper and much of White Album, but the use of 8 track machines and the transistorized board used on Abbey Road left a tangible sonic imprint.

From what I have read in "Recording the Beatles" there is not a radical change in mic placement and use of dynamic control and efx between Sgt Pepper and Abbey Road. Abbey Road has a "sound" that is truly distinct from all that came before.
Yea, the miking was the same, but the drums on Sgt Pepper were unmuffled. They were tuned down and draped with tea towels on Abbey Road. Abbey Road also used 70s staples like the synthesizer and the fender rhodes. The vocals are also quite dry, while Sgt Pepper's are generally drenched in chamber/EMT. It's just a completely different production aesthetic. Look at all the modern rock that's tracked through vintage pres, tube pres, etc. that sound absolutely nothing like 60s/70s music.
Old 17th October 2014
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsowa View Post
Yea, the miking was the same, but the drums on Sgt Pepper were unmuffled. They were tuned down and draped with tea towels on Abbey Road. Abbey Road also used 70s staples like the synthesizer and the fender rhodes. The vocals are also quite dry, while Sgt Pepper's are generally drenched in chamber/EMT. It's just a completely different production aesthetic. Look at all the modern rock that's tracked through vintage pres, tube pres, etc. that sound absolutely nothing like 60s/70s music.
You ignore the documented perceived difference between the EMI tube consoles and the new transistorized one, noted by Ringo and Geoff Emerick.

Ringo and Jeff intensely disliked how the new console handled the sound of the recorded drums.

I will take a giant leap on conjecture and surmise that the slack drum head tuning and tea towels was an attempt to get back some of that tube console mojo!
Old 28th March 2015
  #36
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Pretty obvious that the op is speaking of the transparency imprint, that every album that uses the same pres and line amps throughout would give, and 20 different bands recorded through the same console would sound the same, in this respect, or every song on said album would sound different.
Old 29th March 2015
  #37
Gear Nut
 

I can't belive the number of people, joining a game they don't wanna play?! NOBODY belives the console makes the album - we all know how all of that works, so please go somewhere else to share your 'wisdom', and let people be gear-nerdy in peace. You know - Gearslutz..?
Old 16th July 2015
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timtoonz View Post
I love the sounds on "Trouble in Paradise" ! Just transferred it from vinyl a couple weeks ago, and was marvelling at the 'vintage LA studio' sounds. I think we need a new thread to ask questions about this album….
I know the Harrison at Amigo was used for Tin Huey's "Contents Dislodged During Shipment". They are friends of mine, and as a bonus, I have that console now. We used it for the Huey's "Disinformation" album. Same band, same console. Different sounds. Still lovely.

BTW, I have lost my studio location, so I just tried to list the Harrison in the classifieds here. Just signed up for the classified access an hour ago, so I have no idea if I was successful...
Old 17th July 2015
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsowa View Post
"Next stop was Studio B at the Village Recorder in West LA, housed within a Masonic temple and featuring a 48-channel Harrison console, as well as two Ampex 1200 24-track machines."

CLASSIC TRACKS: Supertramp‘s 'Logical Song'

Not to spoil the fun, but I imagine you like this record more for the way it was performed, recorded, and mixed than what it was recorded through.
+1 Spot On!
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