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Guitar Panning with Multiple Mic's Question.
Old 23rd December 2013
  #1
Guitar Panning with Multiple Mic's Question.

Hey Guys,

Over the years this query has been a little bit of a gremlin for me. I've experimented with it in all sorts of ways, but I am interested in hearing what others do, and what is the most commonly practiced method (if any).

In a typical recording session, I'll have to work with 2 guitarists. I usually have a combination of mics on each guitarists cab speaker. Generally something like a SM57/e906 combined with a MD421.

What I tend to do is pan Guitarist A's two mic channels about 30 to the left, and pan Guitarist B's two channels about 30 to the right. Then I sub-group both. I'f I'm doubling up, they'll go to the same subs.

I'll make extra sub groups for lead channels etc.

However, I am wondering if this would be seen as technically not a good way of working? Sometimes I wonder would the results be better if I kept all channels centred and then done my left and right panning on the Sub Aux strips.

Overdriven guitar is something I particularly struggle with. I experiment a lot of distance, positioning, phase etc to try to achieve a professional sound, but it always comes out sounding a bit odd to me. Not very focused.

Let me know how you guys work with this and please, I know its a bit of a noob question so go easy on me already...
Old 23rd December 2013
  #2
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experiment with this option . . . blend a single guitarists mics or even multiple amps (reamping) until you get a tone that you like . . . now do the same to the second guitarist . . . typically you would pan one guitar to one side and the other guitar to the other side however after doing that, run each guitarist through a delay with a very short time setting (look up Haas effect) where that delayed signal is at lesser volume and panned to the other side. The result is that each guitarist will still sound liked they are panned to their original side however the guitar(s) will sound much larger.
Old 24th December 2013
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmankr View Post
experiment with this option . . . blend a single guitarists mics or even multiple amps (reamping) until you get a tone that you like . . . now do the same to the second guitarist . . . typically you would pan one guitar to one side and the other guitar to the other side however after doing that, run each guitarist through a delay with a very short time setting (look up Haas effect) where that delayed signal is at lesser volume and panned to the other side. The result is that each guitarist will still sound liked they are panned to their original side however the guitar(s) will sound much larger.
Thanks. I knew of the Haas effect but have yet to experiment with it. Sounds interesting though.
Old 24th December 2013
  #4
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bbgallaway's Avatar
 

Think it was Barresi I heard mention this trick, just the fx-free version - close mic and room mic on each amp, pan the close mics out hard opposite each other, then pan each room mic opposite its respective close mic. It's worked well for me lots of times.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmankr View Post
experiment with this option . . . blend a single guitarists mics or even multiple amps (reamping) until you get a tone that you like . . . now do the same to the second guitarist . . . typically you would pan one guitar to one side and the other guitar to the other side however after doing that, run each guitarist through a delay with a very short time setting (look up Haas effect) where that delayed signal is at lesser volume and panned to the other side. The result is that each guitarist will still sound liked they are panned to their original side however the guitar(s) will sound much larger.
Old 24th December 2013
  #5
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turk sanchez's Avatar
...you should probably try less mics and pan a lot wider. 3 mics on each amp w/them not panned out very far could easily yield a mess of phase and masking unless you're VERY careful. Seems like a lot of extra work to blend a bunch of similar dynamic mics.
Old 24th December 2013
  #6
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turk sanchez's Avatar
one other thing I thought (just now) you might like is this...

try using 2 of your mics in X/Y on the speaker. Since they are angled differently, they'll have totally different sounds...but they are in X/Y so they'll be in phase. One will have more lows, and the other will have more highs. Blend to taste but pan them the same/on top of each other. I have done this w/a pair of 57s but it's work just as well or better w/2 diff mics. 57 towards the center of the cone and the 421 towards the outer edge? 57 for highs and 421 for lows?
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