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UKB Drum Techniques Dynamics Processors (HW)
Old 13th October 2013
  #1
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Thread Starter
UBK Drum Techniques

I checked out some of UBK (Kush Audio) movies where he talked about applying separate processing to the Left and Right sides of a drum kit.

I've never heard of this technique, and am wondering how common it is. A completely different Eq and compression treatment for each side of a drum aux sounds radical and interesting.

Who else uses this technique when mixing rock drums?
Old 13th October 2013
  #2
Never tried it...but it's UBK...not UKB!!LOL
Old 13th October 2013
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nu Mixer View Post
I checked out some of UKB (Kush Audio) movies where he talked about applying separate processing to the Left and Right sides of a drum kit.
Sounds like phase reversal to me
A.
Old 13th October 2013
  #4
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by henge View Post
Never tried it...but it's UBK...not UKB!!LOL

LOL, just changed thanks! Guess my dyslexia was kicking in
Old 13th October 2013
  #5
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Not dealing with rock much but I will definitely try it anyway, never thought about it, I'm sure the results can be quite interesting
Thanks for the tip!
A.
Old 13th October 2013
  #6
I've tried it, and didn't like it. That said, I've listened to a few of Greg's recordings and they always sound great, so it's quite clear it works for him.
Old 14th October 2013
  #7
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

Keep in mind I'm generally working with tracks that were recorded with different mics in very different positions. IOW, I'm not generally using typical coincident-mic techniques with the same 2 mics oriented in traditional relationships.

Still, I've treated coincident mics differently as well, especially with eq, and I love the results. The trick is to eq each side based on what else lives on that side; mute the L channel and eq the R drums in relation to the R program. Then do the same for L.

If you've got a low rhodes panned left and nashville guitar panned right, you'll probably enjoy a brighter L drum and warmer, thicker R drum. In addition to greater clarity from all instruments, you get a wider sense of space in the mix.

Dynamics are a whole other animal.

This is not exclusively or even primarily a 'rock' thing, in fact I almost never do anything rock related. It's an amazing technique for electronic music as well, as I rarely have anything L the same as R there, especially in terms of instruments and elements.

If you think of a mix as having three spatial aspects --- L, C, and R --- you can treat those aspect discretely, even if you pinpoint pan. MS eq'ing is all the rage now and no one thinks twice about that, I'm just taking it a step farther, or maybe two steps sideways.


Gregory Scott - ubk
Old 14th October 2013
  #8
Dear Greg,
Please 'lend' me a 6 space lunchbox fulla Electras and a UBK Fatso. I promise you will not be disappointed!

Sincerely,
Sam
Old 14th October 2013
  #9
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

Not a problem, all is ask is that I be able to 'borrow' $3k in return!


Gregory Scott - ubk
Old 14th October 2013
  #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
Not a problem, all is ask is that I be able to 'borrow' $3k in return!


Gregory Scott - ubk
Lemme do the math... Ok done!
Bahahaha (I wish)

Just know I'm saving my ass off for an Electra. Thing seems outrageous!!
Old 14th October 2013
  #11
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Thread Starter
Thanks for taking the time to respond, Greg! I think I'll experiment with this on my next mix.
Old 14th October 2013
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
Keep in mind I'm generally working with tracks that were recorded with different mics in very different positions. IOW, I'm not generally using typical coincident-mic techniques with the same 2 mics oriented in traditional relationships.

Still, I've treated coincident mics differently as well, especially with eq, and I love the results. The trick is to eq each side based on what else lives on that side; mute the L channel and eq the R drums in relation to the R program. Then do the same for L.

If you've got a low rhodes panned left and nashville guitar panned right, you'll probably enjoy a brighter L drum and warmer, thicker R drum. In addition to greater clarity from all instruments, you get a wider sense of space in the mix.

Dynamics are a whole other animal.

This is not exclusively or even primarily a 'rock' thing, in fact I almost never do anything rock related. It's an amazing technique for electronic music as well, as I rarely have anything L the same as R there, especially in terms of instruments and elements.

If you think of a mix as having three spatial aspects --- L, C, and R --- you can treat those aspect discretely, even if you pinpoint pan. MS eq'ing is all the rage now and no one thinks twice about that, I'm just taking it a step farther, or maybe two steps sideways.


Gregory Scott - ubk
Well I know what I'll be fooling around with later tonight!!
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