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Early Rolling Stones recordings
Old 7th January 2014
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
I think the engineers of the day would have made much cleaner recordings if left to their own and wouldn't have taken "risky" decisions to distort drums or vocals on their own without Andrew Oldham sitting on their left shoulder like the devil whispering into their ear. "Go on, do it! Make it sound raw"
I love it. What a great image. Happy thoughts indeed!
Old 7th January 2014
  #32
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I've always thought many early Rolling Stones recordings sounded awful.

In a great way, of course.
Old 7th January 2014
  #33
I personally do not like any recording of Stones records until Beggars Banquet. Quality of the recordings prior many times had too much reverb, not clear, bass sounded horrible. They remixed/remastered their records since the LP days. Now you can hear the acoustic guitar for instance in Satisfaction and the lead melody line was pushed back making the song less aggressive . I never heard they tried to distort the recordings so sound different from the Beatles.
Old 7th January 2014
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
At the time they probably always had Andrew Oldham with them in the studio as their producer.

He was a pioneering visionary and I think he would have made a big effort to "sound different" and break the rules.

I think these early recordings were deliberately distorted and raw sounding - to stand out from the other records being made at the time.

I think the engineers of the day would have made much cleaner recordings if left to their own and wouldn't have taken "risky" decisions to distort drums or vocals on their own without Andrew Oldham sitting on their left shoulder like the devil whispering into their ear. "Go on, do it! Make it sound raw"
Makes sense. Oldham was going for an anti-Beatles image and behaviour, so it's only natural he tried the same sonically. I love both, Beatles and Stones.
Old 7th January 2014
  #35
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Now there's a bunch of Dad Gum dangerous, radical, subversive, pot smokin' hippies if I ever seen one!





Both fresh out of The Greasers vs. The Mods rebellion.
Old 7th January 2014
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickdundee63 View Post
I think you might be confusing two different anecdotes - the overdriven cassette recorder issue is the saturated "electrified" acoustic guitar sound at the start of street fighting man it was a Phillips (also sold as Norelco) and most likely an EL3300. It was an early version that didn't have a built in limiter so it could be overdriven. The cassette part was then put through a speaker, amped up and re-recorded for the final track.

The Satisfaction fuzz was a Gibson pedal that he was using in lieu of the horn section he envisioned recording later.
Correct, though I think he continued using this cassette recorder as an amp...


From "Life" by Keith Richards: "That grinding, dirty sound came out of these crummy little motels where the only thing you had to record with was this new invention called the cassette recorder. And it didn't disturb anybody. Suddenly you had a very mini studio. Playing an acoustic, you'd overload the Philips cassette player to the point of distortion so that when it played back it was effectively an electric guitar. You were using the cassette player as a pickup and an amplifier at the same time. You were forcing acoustic guitars through a cassette player, and what came out the other end was electric as hell. [...] In the studio I plugged the cassette into a little extension speaker and put a microphone in front of the extension speaker so it had a bit more breadth and depth, and put that on tape. That was the basic track. There are no electric instruments on "Street Fighting Man" at all, apart from the bass, which I overdubbed later. All acoustic guitars. [...] I wish I could still do that, but they don't build machines like that anymore. They put a limiter on it soon after that so you couldn't overload it. Just as you're getting off on something, they put a lock on it. The band all thought I was mad, and they sort of indulged me. [...]
"Street Fighting Man," "Jumping Jack Flash" and "Gimme Shelter" were all made just like that, on a cassette machine. I used to layer guitar on guitar. Sometimes there are eight guitars on those tracks. You just mash 'em up. Charlie Watts's drums on "Street Fighting Man" are from this little 1930s practice drummer's kit, in a little suitcase that you popped up, one tiny cymbal, a half-size tambourine that served as a snare, and that's really what it was made on, made on rubbish, made in hotel rooms with our little toys."
Old 10th April 2016
  #37
Thread resurrection!

And here is a photo of the exact model used!
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