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everything about vocals
Old 6th November 2012
  #1
Lives for gear
everything about vocals

can someone help me out. i want to know as much as possible about mixing vocals... doubling, layering, harmonies.. everything.. backing vocals..

how to expand a vocal line..

i noticed that.. i seen for example producer work in studio and got many vocal tracks... but what if you have one vocal track only? what can you do?
Old 9th November 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Red Black's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
can someone help me out. i want to know as much as possible about mixing vocals... doubling, layering, harmonies.. everything.. backing vocals..

how to expand a vocal line..

i noticed that.. i seen for example producer work in studio and got many vocal tracks... but what if you have one vocal track only? what can you do?
Don't you have a Nexus patch or a Fruity Loops construction kit for this?

Well, if you are producing a track you can draw from your creative inspiration.. work with the vocalist and write and record more vocal lines to fill out the arrangement. Identify what you think is missing in your production and use the vocals to 'fill that hole'. An understanding of music theory goes a long way here, both in a technical sense and as a communication tool with musicians you are working with! However, this approach may not work if you get 'your' vocal tracks from illegally uploaded commercial vocal tracks on Youtube..

If you are working in experimental or electronic music creating additional vocal parts from the lead vocal can be a really interesting way to go. It doesn't necessarily sound natural, but it can sound really damn cool! Again it's up to you to be inspired and develop your own techniques. Personally I like using a vocoder fed from the lead vocal.. very artificial but can sound great in the appropriate context! Using Melodyne or Variaudio allows you to create as many realistic sounding harmonies as you desire.. limited only by your inspiration and musical nous. One can also drastically change the rhythm and phrasing of a vocal line using Melodyne or Variaudio.. a weapon of either extreme awesomeness or mass destruction depending on who's 'behind the wheel'..

Another technique is to chop up vocals from other parts of the song and re-order them.. you can even use discarded vocal takes or bits of vocalist dialogue from between vocal takes! Creating 'call and response' type vocal arrangements by chopping up and processing the lead vocal is another technique I've used successfully... lots of happy accidents to stumble across when trying these approaches. A great thing is that you already have the tools needed for such techniques built into every DAW, all you need is the inspiration!

On the other hand, if you are mixing a track that you didn't produce then maybe it was the producer's vision to focus just on the lead vocal? I would personally speak to the producer before you start trying to add extra vocal parts in this scenario, unless you are some hot-shot superstar mixing engineer of course...


Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
I just realized my mixes (mixing) sounds better then commercial songs and mixes.
Oh... my mistake, carry on good sir!
Old 9th November 2012
  #3
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Black View Post
Don't you have a Nexus patch or a Fruity Loops construction kit for this?

Well, if you are producing a track you can draw from your creative inspiration.. work with the vocalist and write and record more vocal lines to fill out the arrangement. Identify what you think is missing in your production and use the vocals to 'fill that hole'. An understanding of music theory goes a long way here, both in a technical sense and as a communication tool with musicians you are working with! However, this approach may not work if you get 'your' vocal tracks from illegally uploaded commercial vocal tracks on Youtube..

If you are working in experimental or electronic music creating additional vocal parts from the lead vocal can be a really interesting way to go. It doesn't necessarily sound natural, but it can sound really damn cool! Again it's up to you to be inspired and develop your own techniques. Personally I like using a vocoder fed from the lead vocal.. very artificial but can sound great in the appropriate context! Using Melodyne or Variaudio allows you to create as many realistic sounding harmonies as you desire.. limited only by your inspiration and musical nous. One can also drastically change the rhythm and phrasing of a vocal line using Melodyne or Variaudio.. a weapon of either extreme awesomeness or mass destruction depending on who's 'behind the wheel'..

Another technique is to chop up vocals from other parts of the song and re-order them.. you can even use discarded vocal takes or bits of vocalist dialogue from between vocal takes! Creating 'call and response' type vocal arrangements by chopping up and processing the lead vocal is another technique I've used successfully... lots of happy accidents to stumble across when trying these approaches. A great thing is that you already have the tools needed for such techniques built into every DAW, all you need is the inspiration!

On the other hand, if you are mixing a track that you didn't produce then maybe it was the producer's vision to focus just on the lead vocal? I would personally speak to the producer before you start trying to add extra vocal parts in this scenario, unless you are some hot-shot superstar mixing engineer of course...




Oh... my mistake, carry on good sir!
dude my mixes sound better then commercial ones cause i have found the secret to mixing. ..but sometimes i am lazy and dont mix my **** properly as i should!

i was wondering how i can make something like this..
when she sings the verse it sounds like it is one vocal.
but listen to the chorus.. i hear something more with the vocals..
listen when she sings fifteen.. they have done something with these vocals.
how?


anyway.. i am not here to waste my time. im here for serious help and feedback.

also, i would like to know what exactly does Vocalign
Old 9th November 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Red Black's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
dude my mixes sound better then commercial ones cause i have found the secret to mixing. ..but sometimes i am lazy and dont mix my **** properly as i should!
No offence at all but your mixes do not sound better than commercial mixes IMHO.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
i was wondering how i can make something like this..
when she sings the verse it sounds like it is one vocal.
but listen to the chorus.. i hear something more with the vocals..
listen when she sings fifteen.. they have done something with these vocals.
how?
I already told you the answer my friend:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red
Well, if you are producing a track you can draw from your creative inspiration.. work with the vocalist and write and record more vocal lines to fill out the arrangement. Identify what you think is missing in your production and use the vocals to 'fill that hole'. An understanding of music theory goes a long way here, both in a technical sense and as a communication tool with musicians you are working with!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
listen when she sings fifteen.. they have done something with these vocals.
how?
This was in my first reply NZN. They recorded more vocals that harmonise with the lead vocal. It's basic pop music production.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
anyway.. i am not here to waste my time. im here for serious help and feedback.
Which is what I gave you: genuine help and feedback.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
also, i would like to know what exactly does VOCalign. and when its useful to use it.
If you have recorded multiple vocal tracks for a part Vocalign will help conform the pitch and/or timing, making the vocal doubles and/or harmonies seem tighter and sound more professional. Of course it's infinitely better IMHO to just record them properly in the first place, even if it does take a few more takes. This comes back to that issue of laziness that you've previously mentioned here on GS.

Cheers!
Old 9th November 2012
  #5
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Black View Post
No offence at all but your mixes do not sound better than commercial mixes IMHO.

they do lol. you just have not heard nothin yet!
Old 9th November 2012
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Red Black's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nznexus View Post
they do lol. you just have not heard nothin yet!
Well, I like your confidence!
Old 9th November 2012
  #7
Gear Head
 
Houston11's Avatar
 

What a god damn motherf..

and I like drugs in the studio...
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