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Is anyone mixing with Shure SRH940?
Old 3rd July 2012
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Is anyone mixing with Shure SRH940?

The thread title says it all basically. I've been using my Sony MDR-V600 for years (not for mixing, just as tracking headphones or for music listening on the go). Ive read great reviews of the Shure SRH940, and I'm wonderin if anyone here has any experience mixing with them. I just moved, and am not sure yet how good my studio room is going to sound, so having reliable headphones seems like a wise purchase right now since my mixing projects are continuing. Furthermore, I may be doing some mobile recording of a drumset, so I want some cans I can trust for placing the mics.

Ive heard conflicting things about the bass of these headphones. Ive heard that it's accurate, and I've heard it's lacking (tight, but not enough of it. Too quiet). So what's the scoop? Ive seen the frequency response graph and it looks pretty flat for a headphone. Do people think it's bass-lacking simply because they are used to bass-heavy headphones?

Thanks
Old 5th July 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Bump. Thanks in advance!
Old 5th July 2012
  #3
I use the SRH940s for tracking classical, but would not be uncomfortable to use them for mixing in a pinch. I have Sony 7509s, 7506s and Sennheiser HD380 Pros, and the 940's are now my first choice by a big margin.

To my ears the bass is very flat and extends down below the Sony 7509's although the 7509s initially sound like they have more bass response due to that slight peaking they have between 50 and 100 Hz. The Shure bass sounds flat to me down to about 25 Hz, while the Sony's drop off at about 35 Hz pretty rapidly.

The real value in the SRH940s is the exceptionally detailed mid range. I can hear details (and instrumental separation) in expertly played violin and cello parts that are difficult to hear with most other phones. The 940s do have a upper treble peak at 9 to 10 kHz, but (to my ears) is not harsh or "brittle" and just lends some "air" to the sound. It is something that you have to be aware of if you're mixing because a mix that sounds perfectly balanced on the 940s may be slightly "dull" if played on most speakers.

They are great for on-location tracking because of the very high isolation and (for me) remain comfortable for hours at a time. The only issue I've had with the 940s is that the phone cup pivots and hinges can make a squeaking noise when they slightly move (if you make a quick head movement) which is conducted to your ears and can be loud and disturbing if you're not expecting it. The first few times it happened, I thought it was in the recording, but soon realized that the noise could occur with no input to the phones. I'm going to try to apply some silicone grease lube to the cup pivots to see if that helps.
Old 5th July 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Thanks a lot for the comments! The extra air worries me a little bit... but the rest sounds absolutely great
Old 6th July 2012
  #5
I'm buying the Shure 840's, they look like they're more neutral.
Old 6th July 2012
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by enzodrum View Post
I'm buying the Shure 840's, they look like they're more neutral.
I think if you listen to them side by side you will have exactly the opposite conclusion. I've done that carefully (at home and in the studio) and to my ears the 940s are flat through the upper bass/lower mid-range (200 to 450 Hz) while the 840s are under-damped and a little "boomy". The upper mids on the 940 just have less distortion and are less fatiguing. They are amazing phones and are cleaner than anything you can find for less then $700.

Virtually every comparison review of the two phones has come up with the same opinion of the 840/940 comparison. RECORDING Magazine did reviews of each in different issues, but by the same author. Those reviews discuss this in detail, concluding with the 940 being more accurate. There is also a fair on-line review here.

Headphone choices, like monitor speakers or microphones, or any other tranducer pick are always a personal preference decision. Don't base your choice on what you read from spec sheets, reviews, or anyone else's opinion (including mine). It's very easy to audition headphones, and pick what you think best meets YOUR needs.

Bottom Line: Both of these Shure models are great phones. I'm convinced that the 940s present a more accurate spectral balance. You may think otherwise, but please make that judgement by actually listening to them. For casual listening, I can see how many people might prefer the slightly heavier bass of the 840s.
Old 6th July 2012
  #7
Thanks Lotus 7 ! Sadly I Don't have the 50-75$ extra at the moment, I will be taking the 840's to replace me ATH M-30.
Next step will be Denon or Senn HD 600
Old 6th July 2012
  #8
The SRH840s are great phones. You'll love them.
I'm really happy that Shure decided to get into the "pro" headphone business and is giving Sony, Sennheiser, AT, AKG and Beyer, etc. some REAL competition.

Just don't ever audition a pair of STAX electrostatic earspeakers. You'll be ruined and broke, forever.
Old 22nd August 2015
  #9
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lotus 7 View Post
I think if you listen to them side by side you will have exactly the opposite conclusion. I've done that carefully (at home and in the studio) and to my ears the 940s are flat through the upper bass/lower mid-range (200 to 450 Hz) while the 840s are under-damped and a little "boomy". The upper mids on the 940 just have less distortion and are less fatiguing. They are amazing phones and are cleaner than anything you can find for less then $700.

hi Lotus , did you hear the shure srh840 right out of the box, or burned in ?

because out of the box i heard the low mid bass bump around 100hz ,with a little scooped mids 800hz. I was a little bit dissapointed, But after 100 hours of burn-in with pink noise at mid-high level, the sound comes up. Mids comes out (around 1khz) in a more detailed way ,mid highs more pleasant, bass bump was less because of this, overall sound was more round , and flat.
Old 22nd August 2015
  #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMNproyect View Post
hi Lotus , did you hear the shure srh840 right out of the box, or burned in ?

because out of the box i heard the low mid bass bump around 100hz ,with a little scooped mids 800hz. I was a little bit dissapointed, But after 100 hours of burn-in with pink noise at mid-high level, the sound comes up. Mids comes out (around 1khz) in a more detailed way ,mid highs more pleasant, bass bump was less because of this, overall sound was more round , and flat.
My comments referred to new phones. Personally, I've never noticed any significant difference between well used (burned in) headphones or monitors, at least not in the dozen and a half or so sets of Sony, Shure, AKG, Sennheiser, AKG, AT, Grado and Koss cans I've accumulated. To me my (probably) 10 year-old MDR 7506s and 7509s sound the same as brand-new pairs, but that's just me, and I've not had a chance to listen to a "burned in" set of SRH840s. I've noticed no difference between a 2-year old, heavily used set of 940s and a new set purchased 6-months ago when compared side by side when the second set was purchased, when driven by an Apogee Ensemble or a SD 788 headphone output during tracking.

I have found bass response differences that are obviously tied to the quality of the driving amplifier, with very low-Z, high current headphone amps like the Schitt Magni-2, and for portable use the FiiO E12 tending to have the smoothest, (flattest) low and mid range response.

I'm sure that people who believe that "burn-in" makes a difference really do hear a difference, at least in uncontrolled, non-double blind comparisons, and I wouldn't argue that it's not possible with some headphones, but personally, I've not experienced any significant changes in any I've tried, at least with high-quality headphones. It's guess it's sort of like religion.
Old 22nd August 2015
  #11
Registered User
 

i use two diff headphones for mixing / monitoring the 940s i also use hd 280 pros
Old 23rd August 2015
  #12
Gear Maniac
thanks Lotus for your answer . it seems you already have a good locker of headphones. Which of your headphones you consider is the flattest, and most acurate (that sounds closer to a studio monitors in some ways), for check mixes? I use the Sennheiser HD600 , but im looking for another open cans and a a closed cans too
Old 23rd August 2015
  #13
I use the HD650s which I find have a basic sound (other than the obvious spatial differences) that matches the SRH940s which are now my "standard" for on-location tracking. Those more than meet my [sonic] needs. I use them (HD650s) for critical headphone-mix edit checking and for fine tuning reverbs. I find that it's easier (for me personally) to use headphones rather than the big monitors for those tasks. Both the HD650s and SRH 940s have minor HF peaking above 8 or 9 kHz, but it is minor and as long as you're aware of it is not an issue. My major concern is extremely low mid-range distortion, and flat response in the fundamental classical instrument and voice ranges (40Hz to about 3.8kHz) and that's where the SRH940s excel.

I've been considering picking up some SRH1840s, but mainly for the improved mechanical design over that of the HD650s, not the sound difference. Although I haven't had any failures with either the HD650s or (2) pairs of SRH-940s, I do find them way too "plasticky" mechanically (like Sonys), and do try to be very careful handling and transporting them.
Old 24th August 2015
  #14
Gear Maniac
You use HD650 for check mixes and SRH 940 for tracking , I thought you use the SRH940 for check mixes because of the high detail in treble. When Tracking with srh940 , tracks never becomes dull because of their 9khz peak or it helps to get an acurate sound?
the srh 940 catch my attention , i read some reviews that people compare it to the HD800. In another threat i also read your coment that srh 940 is near detailed and flat soundwise as the HD800. Do you find alot of similarities between srh940 and HD800 ?
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