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Ever registered a sound recording with the electronic copyright office?
Old 8th May 2012
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Ever registered a sound recording with the electronic copyright office?

6 days ago, I registered a sound recording with the U.S. copyright offices, using the online uploader. It says that I should be expecting my copyright certificate about three months after the date I paid and submitted my application. It also said that the track will be officially copyrighted and I can publish it as soon as I receive the E-MAIL from them that confirms that they have received my application. (assumably this will not take three months, am I right?)

So yeah... I expected it by now. It's already been six days.
Anyone else ever used this online copyright thing from copyright.gov?
How long did it take you? All answers greatly appreciated,

I need to get my stuff on iTunes ASAP.
Old 8th May 2012
  #2
FFT
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuffinManRock View Post
6 days ago, I registered a sound recording with the U.S. copyright offices, using the online uploader. It says that I should be expecting my copyright certificate about three months after the date I paid and submitted my application. It also said that the track will be officially copyrighted and I can publish it as soon as I receive the E-MAIL from them that confirms that they have received my application. (assumably this will not take three months, am I right?)

So yeah... I expected it by now. It's already been six days.
Anyone else ever used this online copyright thing from copyright.gov?
How long did it take you? All answers greatly appreciated,

I need to get my stuff on iTunes ASAP.
I have used the copyright.gov multiple time to copyright my sound recording, and I would say on average it took about 2-3 weeks to get the certificate in... I honestly forgot about it, so when it came in I was surprise.. my advice to you is be patient and as long as your recordings are in the system and you haven't received any info that there is a problem then you are fine.... Legally the recording is already copywritten by you once you record it ..the certificate is just for your reference just in case someone tries to steal your recording you have document proof that you are the author.. if something like that does happen and you dont have the certificate you could always use the date and the info you recieved when you submitted it...You can also call the copyright office to see if you can get more information about the status of your recordings, to ease you mind.

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Old 8th May 2012
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FFT View Post
I have used the copyright.gov multiple time to copyright my sound recording, and I would say on average it took about 2-3 weeks to get the certificate in... I honestly forgot about it, so when it came in I was surprise.. my advice to you is be patient and as long as your recordings are in the system and you haven't received any info that there is a problem then you are fine.... the certificate is just for your reference..

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Alright, I see! Thank you. So when can I publish my song? They said that they will send an email when they have received my application and that at that point I can start selling the track. When did you get that confirmation? Did that email take as long as the certificate? ..or less than two weeks?
Old 8th May 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 
studiostuff's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuffinManRock View Post
Alright, I see! Thank you. So when can I publish my song? They said that they will send an email when they have received my application and that at that point I can start selling the track. When did you get that confirmation? Did that email take as long as the certificate? ..or less than two weeks?

You should receive the email confirmation immediately or within a day or two at most. The certificate comes later. I think 2-3 weeks seems about right.

If you don't get an email from them as soon as you send them your stuff, you may have done it wrong.

Once you have your confirmation number from the email, you can publish.
Old 8th May 2012
  #5
you do know you don't need to pay to copyright your music right? A sound recording is automatically copyrighted as soon as it comes into existence. The arrangement is also automatically copyrighted as soon as it enters some sort of written form (ie sheet music.)

So you don't actually need to do anything to copyright music - all you need is proof of copyright if you were ever in a situation where you need to prove you were the copyright owner. There's no sure-fire legally sound form of proof, but the best and cheapest option is to post a CD of the song to yourself by recorded delivery, and keep it unopened. That will as much proof as anything any of these paid services can give you.
Old 8th May 2012
  #6
FFT
Here for the gear
 

The confirmation email took a couple of days it differed with each one I sent.... but it did not take as long as it took to get the certificate.... I don't remember if it says it on the site but I think it said that the processing time can vary depending on how many applications they get..

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Old 8th May 2012
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marcreeves View Post
the best and cheapest option is to post a CD of the song to yourself by recorded delivery, and keep it unopened. That will as much proof as anything any of these paid services can give you.
A big thank you to Misinformation Man. Legal precedence has established that this is not accepted proof of authorship or copyright.
Old 8th May 2012
  #8
Lives for gear
 
studiostuff's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marcreeves View Post
you do know you don't need to pay to copyright your music right? A sound recording is automatically copyrighted as soon as it comes into existence. The arrangement is also automatically copyrighted as soon as it enters some sort of written form (ie sheet music.)

So you don't actually need to do anything to copyright music - all you need is proof of copyright if you were ever in a situation where you need to prove you were the copyright owner. There's no sure-fire legally sound form of proof, but the best and cheapest option is to post a CD of the song to yourself by recorded delivery, and keep it unopened. That will as much proof as anything any of these paid services can give you.
I'll go even farther to say this person is an absolute fountain of bad advice!

Copyright infringement goes to trial in Federal Court in the US. There is nothing as acceptable there as a registration filed with the US Library of Congress.

All the other stuff... mail this to yourself, mail that to yourself... is crap! If you're spending the money to take something to Federal Court, you want to have it all paid for by the infringing party. So, you are advocating saving $35 bucks to insure something potentially worth BAH-ZILLIONS...?

Cut it out 'marcreeves'. Educate yourself and stfu until you know what the hell you are talking about!
Old 9th May 2012
  #9
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiostuff View Post
I'll go even farther to say this person is an absolute fountain of bad advice!

Copyright infringement goes to trial in Federal Court in the US. There is nothing as acceptable there as a registration filed with the US Library of Congress.

All the other stuff... mail this to yourself, mail that to yourself... is crap! If you're spending the money to take something to Federal Court, you want to have it all paid for by the infringing party. So, you are advocating saving $35 bucks to insure something potentially worth BAH-ZILLIONS...?

Cut it out 'marcreeves'. Educate yourself and stfu until you know what the hell you are talking about!
Well, more importantly, you're not even allowed to sue in the US unless the copyright has been registered. It's not a "paid service". It's the law. Yes, the copyright exists from the moment of creation, and yes, you can go back and register years after the creation of the work. However, nothing but nothing establishes the date of creation better than the actual registration.

Sure, you could try to get a judge to accept a poor-man's copyright, and maybe some judge might actually go for it. Probably not if the opposing attorney is any good, but hey, some judges are stupid, and you might luck out. Or, you could just hand him the copyright certificate you obtained when you wrote the work, and be done with it. Given that you need the certificate to file the case in the first place, well, I think that kind of settles the question of the wisdom of this strategy.
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