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Mic Pre Polarity
Old 22nd May 2006
  #1
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Kyle Ashley's Avatar
 

Mic Pre Polarity

We spent some time last night listening to various mics at my place while setting up for some vocal sessions, and in the course of that, I pushed the polarity buttons on both channels of my GRNV and Phoenix DRS pres. In all cases, the mics sounded slightly fuller/rounder with the polarity flipped. I was monitoring with headphones.

How many of you invert polarity on a single mic when cutting vocals?
Old 22nd May 2006
  #2
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Sounds Great's Avatar
 

While you listen with headphones, you are also listening to your own voice through your head, by inverting the polarity you are separating the two, or in effect getting a doubling of the sound. If you WANT to monitor this way, I would suggest inverting the signal in the monitor section, not sending to tape this way.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #3
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max cooper's Avatar
 

Were you listening to the reverse-polarity tracks in the context of other tracks, or by themselves?

And do you have any cables reversed? Otherwise I'll go with what Soundsgreat says.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #4
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Kyle Ashley's Avatar
 

I was not listening in the context of other tracks, just solo microphone. I am aware of the "head conduction" effect when listening to your own voice through the cans, but I'm curious to know how this affects vocalists when tracking.

Is the rule of thumb to always leave the polarity button out unless there is an obvious problem?
Old 22nd May 2006
  #5
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e-cue's Avatar
 

Check it with an Audio Cricket?
Old 22nd May 2006
  #6
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Sounds Great's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Ashley
I was not listening in the context of other tracks, just solo microphone. I am aware of the "head conduction" effect when listening to your own voice through the cans, but I'm curious to know how this affects vocalists when tracking.
It probably depends on the person, as everyone's head probably conducts sound differently and everyone hears differently.


Quote:
Is the rule of thumb to always leave the polarity button out unless there is an obvious problem?
Personally, I don't like rules. Whatever works, but probably I wouldn't want to lay a track with reverse polarity as it may sound different upon playback. Of course if you are doing computer recording you can probably just reverse it back. I wouldn't know of such things.
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