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"Killer Queen" guitar sound!
Old 16th May 2006
  #31
Gear Maniac
 
Chunky Karma's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by max cooper
Here's a link to the Crispy Cream Germanium Treble Booster.

http://www.treblebooster.com/vitamin_g.htm

"Also, if you want a pedal with the Dallas Rangemaster circuit, but one that also doesn't have excessive hiss and won't pick up radio stations, then look no further. If you absolutely must duplicate Eric Clapton's "Beano" tone...THIS IS THE ONE!"
I believe this is what he uses:
http://www.petecornish.co.uk/vintage...b83extraduplex
He switched to a silicon transistor at some point and apparently hasn't used a booster with a Germaniun transistor for quite some time.
Old 16th May 2006
  #32
Gear Maniac
 
Chunky Karma's Avatar
 

Brian May that is. Not Eric Clapton.
BTW I just picked up this booster and have been really liking it:

http://www.musictoyz.com/guitar/pedals/65.php
Old 16th May 2006
  #33
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I too bought one of those little Brian May Vox amps, and was only mildly amused by it until I plugged it into my Marshall 4X12's loaded with Celestion Greenbacks.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHa.......

I played the solo to Bohemian Rhapsody for hours.
Old 16th May 2006
  #34
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Blast9's Avatar
Evil bastard!tutt
Old 17th May 2006
  #35
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brianroth's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz
Might find this interesting. I kept the vocal down a little.
Interesting indeed! Where did you come up with those solo'ed tracks??

Bri
Old 17th May 2006
  #36
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vernier's Avatar
Quote:
Interesting indeed! Where did you come up with those solo'ed tracks??
Someone got the 16-track out and messed around ...who done it?
Old 17th May 2006
  #37
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brianroth's Avatar
 

I'm gonna listen again.

I love heariing that stuff....

Bri
Old 17th May 2006
  #38
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Jamz's Avatar
Yeah, I love hearing studio stuff as well. In the 90's there were a lot of studio out take CDs circulating. I picked up a 10 CD set of Beatles out takes and an 8 CD box set of the Stones "Satanic out takes". Sometimes tedious but I'm more interested in how they recorded their songs then concert material.
Not a huge Queen fan but several years ago, in typical studio fashion some one passing through had this on a hard drive in PT and dropped it on me. I unearhted it once this thread appeared. An interesting novelty...ONLY!

FYI This is not the 2" but merely a copy that was floating around. If not cool to post for "educational" purposes I will gladly delete. Not sure if it was 16 track. There are 24 PT tracks but clearly the background vocals were done on a slave reel and bounced back in sections to 5 or 6 tracks. Most are doubled (or tripled?) single notes of the harmony. One track has several notes. Also, 6 tracks of guitar, all single parts except one track which has several gits doing that May harmony thing. Amazing guitar player. He arranged his parts like an orchestrated guitar section. The bass was DI and mic with an overdubbed fill on one track.

Speaking of bouncing down (reduction), thinking out loud here...there have been a few discussions on bouncing down within DAWs and the subsequent debate whether there is any degradation or not. I think about slave reels and bouncing down to the original reel, then being mixed down to another tape and then being mastered to yet another tape. Thats a few tape generations down. Do we complain about added tape hiss or high end frequency loss? I (we) grew up listening with this as our only standard. How much of a recording we sometimes perceive as "warm" is actually a particular microphone, mic pre etc. as opposed to tape bouncing.
Just a thought.

Again, since this is merely a copy who knows what the real tracks are. Keep in mind if it was a 24 track machine and there are 24 tracks (at least in PT)...where did SMPTE go? So I don't know.
Just a novelty and interesting to see how they arranged their parts. No auto tune, no quantizing...just excellent musicians and production.
Old 17th May 2006
  #39
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Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz
Might find this interesting. I kept the vocal down a little.
TOO COOL!
Old 17th May 2006
  #40
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Steve G's Avatar
A few years back I got to work on the surround mix of "A Night At The Opera", with Elliot Scheiner, RTB, and Brian. Elliot and I spent a lot of time just talking with Brian about how the recordings were done. He told us that the process was pretty much the same for all the records they made. The tracks were cut as a three piece, drums, bass, and either gtr or piano. When they had a basic track, they then created a master tape (24 track), bouncing the drums down to 4 tracks (kick, snare, drums L, drums R). The bass always had 3 tracks, DI, amp mic, and amp direct. We were able to match the original bass sound simply by playing with the phase or the three tracks. Next came the back round vocals. Recording and bouncing until they had what they wanted, sometimes up to 25 or 30 tracks. For the most part, we got them as a stereo pair on the 24 track. After the vocals were done, Brian would do his gtr parts, bouncing as necessary. The stacked parts were usually bounced to 2 tracks, same as the vocals, and leads and solos were kept separate when possible. Then any other overdubs, perc, etc. At that point, the mixing was simple, lots of hands on the console. There were lots of fader rides done on the original mixes, and lots of mutes. They had stuff jammed into every hole they could find on tape. As far as Brian and RTB could remember, the mixes were not done in sections; they were performed as a whole piece, with each band member manning his own faders, and RTB in charge or the overall. The surround mix was a bit more complicated, because we had to recreate what they had done. We spent a lot of time listening to parts on the original records, thanks to Brian there are a few gtr parts on the surround that are not on the original records. Most of the phasing effects and delays were printed into the bounces, so we didn't have to try and recreate those (thank God), but the mixes still took us some time to do, about a song a day, maybe two days for the bigger ones. Sorry I'm ranting on a bit, but I thought it might be interesting to the thread. Working with those guys on that record was such a thrill, an experience I'll never forget.

Steve
Old 17th May 2006
  #41
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Blast9's Avatar
Wow... That's flippin' amazing! Thanks for sharing. I LOVE THIS FORUM!!!

Interesting about not doing the songs in sections, because I can hear what sounds like drop-ins e.g. Brighton Rock (Sheer Heart Attack), and on the exposed multitrack bounces posted here.

I guess they dropped in or spliced the best takes wherever they needed to
Old 17th May 2006
  #42
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Jamz's Avatar
FWIW I did not get the impression "Killer Queen" was recorded in sections.
Old 17th May 2006
  #43
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Agreed... I love that you can hear Roger Tayloer saying "Not bad!" after that take

I'm curious what the various clicks are on the guitar bounces though... Drop-ins I'm guessing, when they constructed the "guitar orchestra" maybe by splicing the tape? They seem to occur at the beginning of sections, eg 1 min 35, 1'46 1'50 and 2'03
Old 17th May 2006
  #44
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vernier's Avatar
Probably hearing mute switches, not edits.
Old 17th May 2006
  #45
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barefoot's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz
Might find this interesting. I kept the vocal down a little.
Man, where did you get those tracks?
Old 18th May 2006
  #46
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vernier's Avatar
He already said it was a "copy that was floating around."
Old 18th May 2006
  #47
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Jamz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by vernier
He already said it was a "copy that was floating around."
Thank you
Old 18th May 2006
  #48
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in heaven now...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz
Might find this interesting. I kept the vocal down a little.
Jim - Thanks -- I live to hear artists as they lay tracks down that are so familiar. Stuff like the Beatles Anthology, Pet Sounds Sessions, etc. I just can't get enough. This is truly 'Killer' Queen!

Thom
Old 18th May 2006
  #49
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vernier's Avatar
It's not a big deal for an engineer with key's to the vault to put up a song and mess with faders. Either someone did that with "Killer", or these partial mixes were made for members of the band back when they were recording it, which is totally routine.
Old 18th May 2006
  #50
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max cooper's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Screws
I too bought one of those little Brian May Vox amps, and was only mildly amused by it until I plugged it into my Marshall 4X12's loaded with Celestion Greenbacks.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHa.......

I played the solo to Bohemian Rhapsody for hours.
Also, the old eighties Marshall Lead 12 plugged into a Marshall 412 is nice.

Then try plugging the amp into one of those little Walkman speakers that are made to plug into the Walkman headphone jack, then mic it up. It's boss!
Old 11th October 2006
  #51
Gear Addict
 
16/44.1's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve G View Post
A few years back I got to work on the surround mix of "A Night At The Opera", with Elliot Scheiner, RTB, and Brian. Elliot and I spent a lot of time just talking with Brian about how the recordings were done. He told us that the process was pretty much the same for all the records they made. The tracks were cut as a three piece, drums, bass, and either gtr or piano. When they had a basic track, they then created a master tape (24 track), bouncing the drums down to 4 tracks (kick, snare, drums L, drums R). The bass always had 3 tracks, DI, amp mic, and amp direct. We were able to match the original bass sound simply by playing with the phase or the three tracks. Next came the back round vocals. Recording and bouncing until they had what they wanted, sometimes up to 25 or 30 tracks. For the most part, we got them as a stereo pair on the 24 track. After the vocals were done, Brian would do his gtr parts, bouncing as necessary. The stacked parts were usually bounced to 2 tracks, same as the vocals, and leads and solos were kept separate when possible. Then any other overdubs, perc, etc. At that point, the mixing was simple, lots of hands on the console. There were lots of fader rides done on the original mixes, and lots of mutes. They had stuff jammed into every hole they could find on tape. As far as Brian and RTB could remember, the mixes were not done in sections; they were performed as a whole piece, with each band member manning his own faders, and RTB in charge or the overall. The surround mix was a bit more complicated, because we had to recreate what they had done. We spent a lot of time listening to parts on the original records, thanks to Brian there are a few gtr parts on the surround that are not on the original records. Most of the phasing effects and delays were printed into the bounces, so we didn't have to try and recreate those (thank God), but the mixes still took us some time to do, about a song a day, maybe two days for the bigger ones. Sorry I'm ranting on a bit, but I thought it might be interesting to the thread. Working with those guys on that record was such a thrill, an experience I'll never forget.

Steve
Nice to read this, as i'm one of the biggest Queen fan in the lowlands.........
Btw........i do hope that DCC label will do the remastering of all the queentracks.
To begin with the thirst three albums.
Start with Queen II, and "See What A Fool I've Been" as a bonus heh.
Old 11th October 2006
  #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Screws View Post
I too bought one of those little Brian May Vox amps, and was only mildly amused by it until I plugged it into my Marshall 4X12's loaded with Celestion Greenbacks.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHa.......

I played the solo to Bohemian Rhapsody for hours.
To take that idea in reverse I've taken to padding down my Hiwatt Dr504 through a THD hotplate then plugging that into a single Auratone. Not in the attempt to recreate any one person's tone but taking the small amp=tone idea championed by Brian May, Neil Young, and Jimmy Page. Sounds great. Records even better. Paint peeling feedback and sustain at low levels. That little radio speaker also does a lot of the EQing for you.
Old 11th October 2006
  #53
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Blast9's Avatar
Wow, brilliant! ... Gonna have to try that! I have the DR504 the THD hotplate, all I need is a horror-tone!

Great tip thanks.
Old 12th October 2006
  #54
js1
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On the previously mentioned Night at the Opera Classic Albums DVD, Brian May talks tone in the special features.

He does a lot of his solos set between the middle and bridge pickups (which are out of phase). That got me a lot closer.

js
Old 12th November 2006
  #55
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smoore98's Avatar
 

Is there still a link to get those solo'ed tracks?

Scott
Old 12th November 2006
  #56
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Blast9's Avatar
Hey Scott, PM me!
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